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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    A strong A level like English would be really important for her. I wish her the best.



    TSR needs good adult role models like me; someone who can assert authority over you rapscallions.
    lol okay Sir
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    Yes it breaks my heart when they don't understand even after they are trying really hard (if they're not trying then I have less sympathy). It is outweighed usually by the feeling of a student finally getting it though after much struggling; a great feeling when that happens!

    University level maths is at an extremely fast pace. Don't try to understand everything in lectures, just make sure you have it written down. Check if the lecturer uploads online or not. If you really must skip a lecture, then the ones to skip are the ones where they just read off the slides that they've posted online anyway.
    Yeah, the feeling when someone understands something you've explained to them is one of the greatest! It was one of the reasons i chose to help in lessons when i could have spent that time sleeping(!)

    Thanks for taking the time to reply! I would ask more questions but i don't want to be annoying(!)
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    This is one of the worst phenomena about the public school system in this country. It's quite sad. Teachers deserve better.
    I couldn't agree more. I posted this about three pages ago and it sums up how senior management can be the downfall of their own school:

    Your senior management sound quite supportive. I wish mine were like that. I remember right at the very start of my NQT, my second week of teaching, a student said that I had a chode and then stuck his middle finger up at me blatantly. I called the senior management who spoke to the boy; he denied that any of that happened. The senior leader then asked other members of the class if the boy had said I had a chode and made the gesture and each of them said 'no'. The boy had threatened them beforehand to say 'no' when he knew that I was going to make a senior team call out as he was aware that they would be interviewed as witnesses.

    Nothing happened to him as it was just my word against his.
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    (Original post by charlesn202)
    Yeah, the feeling when someone understands something you've explained to them is one of the greatest! It was one of the reasons i chose to help in lessons when i could have spent that time sleeping(!)

    Thanks for taking the time to reply! I would ask more questions but i don't want to be annoying(!)
    Feel free to ask more if you want! I've still got 2 days left till school starts.
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    What do you guys ACTUALLY do in the INSET days?
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    What I have seen at school has really cemented my hatred towards ill-mannered and uncivilised pupils.
    I'm reluctant to put all the blame on the pupils. What's become clear to me since I've started teaching is that these problems would be pretty much eradicated if these students had strong, firm discipline both at home and at school. The outrageous reluctance for some parents to discipline their 'little angels' and the absolute cowardice from some senior teachers is the cause of these problems. That combined with the media glorifying airheads such as Kim Kardashian, David McIntosh and Lucy Meck who spend most of their lives taking selfies and going to parties as 'role models' is also to blame for the fact that students (yes, even some from middle and upper class backgrounds) treat the education system and its teachers like pieces of ****.

    Rant over (apologies for any grammatical errors).
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    I envy you for making an post like this.
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    (Original post by danconway)
    What do you guys ACTUALLY do in the INSET days?
    Bugger all usually. Some guy will come in and tell us about diabetes and then the school's SEN (special educational needs) team will tell us about dyslexia and dyscalculia. Then the senior team will do a speech saying that we're the best school in the county but our A level results continue to be **** and that this is a problem. Then someone will tell us how to take the register. That's about it.
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    How many extra hours would you say you put in? (so doing stuff like marking, revision sessions etc, basically school related stuff but not in school time)
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    (Original post by Scepticism)
    I envy you for making an post like this.
    Which post?
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    Also, do fall outs often occur between teachers and other teachers, and teachers and head teacher?
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    (Original post by angelfox)
    How many extra hours would you say you put in? (so doing stuff like marking, revision sessions etc, basically school related stuff but not in school time)
    At least 15 hours a week, often more.

    We have:

    Meetings (at least 2 a week with department, year team, SEN etc.)
    After school revision sessions for Year 11 and above, sometimes Year 10 too (an hour each)
    Marking (takes me about 2 hours to mark a set of books for a class of 32, often a lot more if I get distracted/bored)
    Lesson planning and resource making (the biggest time consumer of all)
    Writing up interventions (I have to write a summary of any after-school interventions to senior staff)
    Duties
    Detentions
    Calling parents
    Parent's evenings
    Helping others in department


    Probably not even a complete list there either.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    Feel free to ask more if you want! I've still got 2 days left till school starts.
    I just forgot what i wanted to ask D: If i remember I'll ask it though!
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    Do you have any favourite students?

    Also, do you LOATHE any of your students?

    If you have/will have a child, would you like them to attend the school you teach at or get them to avoid it?
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    (Original post by angelfox)
    Also, do fall outs often occur between teachers and other teachers, and teachers and head teacher?
    Fall outs occur often between teachers from different departments. Within maths, I can't remember a fall out occurring to be honest, we're always polite to each other even when stressed.

    A lot of people don't like the head teacher but I wouldn't say there have been any fallings out with him as such.
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    Do you have any favourite students?

    Also, do you LOATHE any of your students?

    If you have/will have a child, would you like them to attend the school you teach at or get them to avoid it?
    Of course, I have students that I like a lot. I like students that have no fear and don't mind making fools of themselves a bit; they give things a go in maths even if they're not sure. I like students that are friendly and engage in small talk and polite conversation with me. I like students that are honest and humble and admit that they are not perfect and are honest about any behavioural mistakes they might have made. I like students that are driven and motivated, despite obstacles in their life at home and school.

    I don't loathe any students but there are definitely some that I dread teaching and some that I wish the school would just exclude! Now before you have a go at me for saying this, I actually believe that exclusion would do some of them benefit; I don't think their needs can be met in a mainstream school and a specialist school for badly behaved students would actually a better environment for them. They would get more attention there because of smaller class sizes and specialist staff.

    So, yes, I don't like the rude and belligerent students but loathe might be too strong a word.

    I'd want my children to go to the best school possible which may end up being my school or may be somewhere else.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    Of course, I have students that I like a lot. I like students that have no fear and don't mind making fools of themselves a bit; they give things a go in maths even if they're not sure. I like students that are friendly and engage in small talk and polite conversation with me. I like students that are honest and humble and admit that they are not perfect and are honest about any behavioural mistakes they might have made. I like students that are driven and motivated, despite obstacles in their life at home and school.

    I don't loathe any students but there are definitely some that I dread teaching and some that I wish the school would just exclude! Now before you have a go at me for saying this, I actually believe that exclusion would do some of them benefit; I don't think their needs can be met in a mainstream school and a specialist school for badly behaved students would actually a better environment for them. They would get more attention there because of smaller class sizes and specialist staff.

    So, yes, I don't like the rude and belligerent students but loathe might be too strong a word.

    I'd want my children to go to the best school possible which may end up being my school or may be somewhere else.
    That doesn't answer my question. :rolleyes:
    On a percentage scale, what are the chances you would allow your child to attend your school?
    Also, would you make it public knowledge the child is your son/daughter or keep it quiet?
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    If the kids found out about your autism, would some of them use it against you?
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    That doesn't answer my question. :rolleyes:
    On a percentage scale, what are the chances you would allow your child to attend your school?
    Also, would you make it public knowledge the child is your son/daughter or keep it quiet?
    That would depend on how good the school was. Me teaching there would have no effect on whether my child would go there or not. I'm not sure how I can put a percentage on it?

    If I teach at the best school in the area then 100% I want him/her to go there. If I teach at a school that isn't the best that they can go to in the area then 0% that they will go there.

    I wouldn't mind if people knew they were my son/daughter. People would find out anyway.
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    (Original post by godd)
    If the kids found out about your autism, would some of them use it against you?
    I'd be willing to bet that a lot of them would do that. Some of it would be out of ignorance, mind you, as they might not fully understand what autism is.
 
 
 
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