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    (Original post by digitalis)
    V similar, but lot less unis who are in high demand. U of Toronto has a two week application window per half year per year. Need to apply like 6/12 in advance and pay a like 250 pound private medical to go (put me off going to do mine there)
    I've heard of some places charging admin fees and tuition costs - is that a widespread thing or is travel/accom still the overriding cost factor?

    Thanks for all this insight, btw, I've still got a while before I need to get things actually planned but it's good to get all this info ahead of time
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I've heard of some places charging admin fees and tuition costs - is that a widespread thing or is travel/accom still the overriding cost factor?

    Thanks for all this insight, btw, I've still got a while before I need to get things actually planned but it's good to get all this info ahead of time
    Yes, it is pretty institution dependant but you generally have to pay some form of fee. I did see places that don't charge though.
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    How are you finding the lifestyle aspect of living and working in the US? Do you even have time to do anything other than work and sleep?


    (Original post by digitalis)
    Yes, it is pretty institution dependant but you generally have to pay some form of fee. I did see places that don't charge though.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    How are you finding the lifestyle aspect of living and working in the US? Do you even have time to do anything other than work and sleep?
    I had a week off before I started, which was great. Americans are very friendly, I think the accent helps a lot. The whole lifestyle/culture shock was massive at first, I was literally wandering around completely lost. You would think some things are same since we speak the same language etc, but it is really very different. Like even in the supermarkets, I recognise NOTHING. Bizarre! Big car culture, big consumer culture: consumer is king here, they really do hold the power.

    I have managed to go out a few times after 'work', went out yesterday with the team which was really fun, really nice rooftop bar. Also made it out to go sightseeing one evening, but bailed at half eight as I was tired. Usually in bed by 10ish. Old man!!
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I had a week off before I started, which was great. Americans are very friendly, I think the accent helps a lot. The whole lifestyle/culture shock was massive at first, I was literally wandering around completely lost. You would think some things are same since we speak the same language etc, but it is really very different. Like even in the supermarkets, I recognise NOTHING. Bizarre! Big car culture, big consumer culture: consumer is king here, they really do hold the power.

    I have managed to go out a few times after 'work', went out yesterday with the team which was really fun, really nice rooftop bar. Also made it out to go sightseeing one evening, but bailed at half eight as I was tired. Usually in bed by 10ish. Old man!!
    Don't knock early bedtimes, now I'm no longer a teenager I can appreciate the benefits of being a functioning human being before noon. :awesome:
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    'Doctors are like diamonds. The more you reflect, the more you shine'

    Quote from our very first reflective writing lecture hehe.
    Hahaha this comment is hilarious!! I just got back from exchange and am filling in my reflective logbook, after spending all day reflecting on my past experiences of teaching and learning. This is depressing me. I am also hating that I am being a perfectionist over my exchange essay. I should be in bed now, but I am still messing around with the references and trying to find some pictures to put in (2 images is compulsory for no apparent reason). Argh!!

    I have been looking forward to planning my elective since I started medical school, but now the time has come I really can't be bothered. I want to go to Senegal, but it is going to be so stressful to organise. I need to stop putting it off. At least intercalating will give me an extra year. Digitalis you are making me so tempted to go to America, your experience sounds amazing!! Hope you keep enjoying it! My dream elective would be half US, half Senegal, but a friend in the year above recently did something similar and the cost bought tears to my eyes, so I think I need to accept that is not an option.
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    (Original post by mrs_bellamy)
    Digitalis you are making me so tempted to go to America, your experience sounds amazing!!
    It's a great experience, but I think I'm getting a lot out of it as I quite want to do a residency, so I am constantly comparing systems and thinking 'is this something I want to do?'

    You really have to be on the ball here, medical school is like med school on crack back home. The MS3s are extremely knowledgeable and the MS4s as I have mentioned, are treated as interns.

    You do have to assess what you want to get out of your elective too. If you want a beach holiday, that's perfectly acceptable but I think doing a sub-I elective in the US is really not for:
    a.) slackers
    b.) those who want to sightsee/do beachtime/go in for a wardround and get signed off and go home

    Another tip is to make sure you are comfortable doing full admissions at speed, i.e. clerking in fresh admits, ordering investigations etc and presenting patients fluently. Pre rounding (consisting of getting to the patient usually on different floors and wings so factor walk time, talking to the nurse, talking to the pt and examining them, looking up overnight investigations, imaging and consults, making a problem based assessment and plan and writing this up) should take no more than 20 minutes if you value your sleep.

    It would also be beneficial in doing telephone referrals a few times. You will of course be helped out if you need it, but you will have an easier time and be more useful if you are comfortable with this before (I learnt the hard way!) Updating lists as well.

    Try and understand US units as well, things like creatinine, glucose are different.
    Learn shorthand for writing bloods (these are excellent and it would be great if they became common back home, they are known as 'fishbones')

    Learn the significance of 'rarer' investigations that are common here, Mg, PO4, Ca,Urine electrolytes, serum and urine osms are ones that I have had to get my head around.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    It's a great experience, but I think I'm getting a lot out of it as I quite want to do a residency, so I am constantly comparing systems and thinking 'is this something I want to do?'

    You really have to be on the ball here, medical school is like med school on crack back home. The MS3s are extremely knowledgeable and the MS4s as I have mentioned, are treated as interns.

    You do have to assess what you want to get out of your elective too. If you want a beach holiday, that's perfectly acceptable but I think doing a sub-I elective in the US is really not for:
    a.) slackers
    b.) those who want to sightsee/do beachtime/go in for a wardround and get signed off and go home

    Another tip is to make sure you are comfortable doing full admissions at speed, i.e. clerking in fresh admits, ordering investigations etc and presenting patients fluently. Pre rounding (consisting of getting to the patient usually on different floors and wings so factor walk time, talking to the nurse, talking to the pt and examining them, looking up overnight investigations, imaging and consults, making a problem based assessment and plan and writing this up) should take no more than 20 minutes if you value your sleep.

    It would also be beneficial in doing telephone referrals a few times. You will of course be helped out if you need it, but you will have an easier time and be more useful if you are comfortable with this before (I learnt the hard way!) Updating lists as well.

    Try and understand US units as well, things like creatinine, glucose are different.
    Learn shorthand for writing bloods (these are excellent and it would be great if they became common back home, they are known as 'fishbones')

    Learn the significance of 'rarer' investigations that are common here, Mg, PO4, Ca,Urine electrolytes, serum and urine osms are ones that I have had to get my head around.
    I wish I could rep you again, great advice! I am becoming even more tempted, I really don't want a slacker elective. I want to get as much out of it as possible. I've heard so much about how tough it is in the US I like the idea of trying it out for myself. Hmmm, maybe I could get a loan...

    I hope you enjoy the rest of it and it doesn't wear you out too much. Has it changed your thoughts on doing a residency?
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    (Original post by mrs_bellamy)
    I wish I could rep you again, great advice! I am becoming even more tempted, I really don't want a slacker elective. I want to get as much out of it as possible. I've heard so much about how tough it is in the US I like the idea of trying it out for myself. Hmmm, maybe I could get a loan...

    I hope you enjoy the rest of it and it doesn't wear you out too much. Has it changed your thoughts on doing a residency?
    No, it's encouraged me rather! The only thing thats playing at the back of my mind now is family really! It's awfully far from home the other thing is whether I actually want to do F1 next year/apply during F1 and interview during my annual leave days/take a year off and work in Canada pulling pints and apply...lots to think about!
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    Slighty random question but does anyone know anyone who has done/is/considering becoming a ships doctor this is something that has interested me for some time and I think it is time to start looking more into it.

    Digitalis sounds like you have had an amazing time, but by the sounds of it I probably wouldn't hack it myself. I need time outside medicine! (plus a bit of a slacker I feel)
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Slighty random question but does anyone know anyone who has done/is/considering becoming a ships doctor this is something that has interested me for some time and I think it is time to start looking more into it.

    Whats a ships doctor? Am i missing something?
    Then again my mind is beginning to rust over considering I havent spoken a full sentence in nearly two weeks.
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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    Whats a ships doctor? Am i missing something?
    Then again my mind is beginning to rust over considering I havent spoken a full sentence in nearly two weeks.
    As in a doctor who works on a ship. Those floaty things in the sea :p:
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    As in a doctor who works on a ship. Those floaty things in the sea :p:

    As in the navy - isnt that a submarine?
    I had to double read that because I thought you said a floater in the sea!
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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    As in the navy - isnt that a submarine?
    I had to double read that because I thought you said a floater in the sea!
    1) The Navy has plenty of ships that don't go underwater - i.e. aircraft carriers etc :p:

    2) I think he means civilian ships - I guess some longhaul cruise ships have doctors? No idea? Never been on one :p:
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    You know what's easier than medicine?

    Sleeping.

    You know what I prefer doing than going to medicine lectures?

    Sleeping.

    You know what kind of learning is not problem-based?

    Sleeping.

    Thus, I have concluded that I shall now transfer, and take a vocational degree in sleeping. And then become asleep(er). :moon:

    If only.
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    You know what's easier than medicine?

    Sleeping.

    You know what I prefer doing than going to medicine lectures?

    Sleeping.

    You know what kind of learning is not problem-based?

    Sleeping.

    Thus, I have concluded that I shall now transfer, and take a vocational degree in sleeping. And then become asleep(er). :moon:

    If only.
    This is all well and good but in our flat it seems FIFA is the most important thing in our world :moon:
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    (Original post by a moist feeling)
    This is all well and good but in our flat it seems FIFA is the most important thing in our world :moon:
    Second only to drinking
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    (Original post by a moist feeling)
    This is all well and good but in our flat it seems FIFA is the most important thing in our world :moon:
    I'm dying to play the new fifa! my flatmate doesn't like football though :facepalm:

    Oh well, there's always Forza 4..
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    (Original post by Tech)
    I'm dying to play the new fifa! my flatmate doesn't like football though :facepalm:

    Oh well, there's always Forza 4..
    It is really good but induces so much rage within the flat when someone loses :rofl:

    Forza 4 looks incredible :coma:
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    1) The Navy has plenty of ships that don't go underwater - i.e. aircraft carriers etc :p:

    2) I think he means civilian ships - I guess some longhaul cruise ships have doctors? No idea? Never been on one :p:
    Yeah merchant navy. I would cope with navy!
    Also as an aside subs are technically boats not ships
 
 
 
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