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    2nd year is so much harder than 1st year. I imagine this will only get worse as the year goes on Plus thinking about intercalating= major headache!
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Anyone know if there is any long-term treatment usually undertaken for chronic and idiopathic tachycardia? beta blockers?

    For chronic -surely you'd want to know where its originating from to target pharmacological intervention - such as AVN blocking etc.

    Not so sure about idiopathic tachycardias though.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Not enjoying lab work anymore keep making daft mistakes. Think I'm going senile
    It's just so slow compared to medicine. You're not alone in daft mistakes though - I broke one of my osteoporotic mice bones today having spent half an hour dissecting the same thing out
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    It's just so slow compared to medicine. You're not alone in daft mistakes though - I broke one of my osteoporotic mice bones today having spent half an hour dissecting the same thing out
    Oh no but that's understandable as it was osteoporotic, one of my mistakes was forgetting to dilute the staining solution for staining DNA in lymphocytes. Meant to dilute 2.5μ/ml but used it undiluted = LOTS of background staining. Thank heavens the PhD student that prepared the lymphocytes for me made a spare set but also that only happened on the one patient sample so definitely more careful in following protocols now. I honestly wasn't this stupid back in medicine and when cannulating patients! Whats your project on though? That sounds pretty interesting!

    Hows your supervision? Do you get watched every time you do a new procedure or do you get taught it once and then are left to do it?
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Oh no but that's understandable as it was osteoporotic, one of my mistakes was forgetting to dilute the staining solution for staining DNA in lymphocytes. Meant to dilute 2.5μ/ml but used it undiluted = LOTS of background staining. Thank heavens the PhD student that prepared the lymphocytes for me made a spare set but also that only happened on the one patient sample so definitely more careful in following protocols now. I honestly wasn't this stupid back in medicine and when cannulating patients! Whats your project on though? That sounds pretty interesting!

    Hows your supervision? Do you get watched every time you do a new procedure or do you get taught it once and then are left to do it?
    I'm not really in a proper lab as such cos my project is engineering and imaging based, but I was shown how to dissect and then told I could come in any time and do it. Went in tonight unsupervised to do some embedding prep, only to find that the guy supervising me (PhD student) was already there. Once I get onto the imaging stuff, I get training on one kind of microscopy, but have to hand over my samples to someone else for the big fancy stuff. My project's on a mouse model of steroid osteoporosis, using electron microscopy to look at the bone microstructure. What are you doing?
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I'm not really in a proper lab as such cos my project is engineering and imaging based, but I was shown how to dissect and then told I could come in any time and do it. Went in tonight unsupervised to do some embedding prep, only to find that the guy supervising me (PhD student) was already there. Once I get onto the imaging stuff, I get training on one kind of microscopy, but have to hand over my samples to someone else for the big fancy stuff. My project's on a mouse model of steroid osteoporosis, using electron microscopy to look at the bone microstructure. What are you doing?
    any reason why you code to do engineering?
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    (Original post by reallys)
    any reason why you code to do engineering?
    I want to do orthopaedics in the future, so medical engineering is a good basis for that.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I'm not really in a proper lab as such cos my project is engineering and imaging based, but I was shown how to dissect and then told I could come in any time and do it. Went in tonight unsupervised to do some embedding prep, only to find that the guy supervising me (PhD student) was already there. Once I get onto the imaging stuff, I get training on one kind of microscopy, but have to hand over my samples to someone else for the big fancy stuff. My project's on a mouse model of steroid osteoporosis, using electron microscopy to look at the bone microstructure. What are you doing?
    That sound's really good! So are you looking to develop new imaging techniques for steroid induced osteoporosis? Also pretty cool you get to dissect too, how are you finding it all so far?

    Mine is a full year of lab work looking into radiotherapy induced heart disease and biological ageing. Because of early cancer detection and longer survival rates, the long term effects of radiotherapy are now being seen and cardiac complications are one of the major side effects (and cause of non cancer related deaths) for patients receiving mediastinal radiotherapy. So I'm looking into DNA damage and repair, apoptotic response of lymphocytes to ionising radiation, changes in telomere length at different time points after radiotherapy etc to measure tissue damage and biological ageing of the tissue.
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    (Original post by billet-doux)
    2nd year is so much harder than 1st year. I imagine this will only get worse as the year goes on Plus thinking about intercalating= major headache!
    Second year is a massive slog - you just have to keep ploughing on. It feels never-ending but just keep focusing on the fact that once it's over, you have the much-more-interesting clinical years to look forward to.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    My project's on a mouse model of steroid osteoporosis, using electron microscopy to look at the bone microstructure. What are you doing?
    That sounds cool.

    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    So I'm looking into DNA damage and repair, apoptotic response of lymphocytes to ionising radiation, changes in telomere length at different time points after radiotherapy etc to measure tissue damage and biological ageing of the tissue.
    As does that.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    That sound's really good! So are you looking to develop new imaging techniques for steroid induced osteoporosis? Also pretty cool you get to dissect too, how are you finding it all so far?
    Kind of - it's part of a bigger project trying to validate the mouse model as an accurate representation of what occurs in humans, and also looking at alternatives to BMD/DEXA in diagnosing osteoporosis. I'm still kind of floundering, tbh! It's a case of juggling my timetable with everyone else's to get imaging time, and the lab is split between two sites which isn't helping matters. Trying to tackle the literature review stuff at the moment - the plan is to write it up as I go along. Quite enjoying the dissection, though gave up after 90mins today as mouse bones are tiny and straining my eyes.

    Mine is a full year of lab work looking into radiotherapy induced heart disease and biological ageing. Because of early cancer detection and longer survival rates, the long term effects of radiotherapy are now being seen and cardiac complications are one of the major side effects (and cause of non cancer related deaths) for patients receiving mediastinal radiotherapy. So I'm looking into DNA damage and repair, apoptotic response of lymphocytes to ionising radiation, changes in telomere length at different time points after radiotherapy etc to measure tissue damage and biological ageing of the tissue.
    So do you not have modules alongside or is your iBSc entirely research based? That sounds really interesting! Are you enjoying it so far? Sounds quite daunting to be dealing with patient samples - at least if I mess mine up, there's another mouse in the freezer! Is the aim to identify how much damage is occuring with a long term aim of figuring out how to prevent it?
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Kind of - it's part of a bigger project trying to validate the mouse model as an accurate representation of what occurs in humans, and also looking at alternatives to BMD/DEXA in diagnosing osteoporosis. I'm still kind of floundering, tbh! It's a case of juggling my timetable with everyone else's to get imaging time, and the lab is split between two sites which isn't helping matters. Trying to tackle the literature review stuff at the moment - the plan is to write it up as I go along. Quite enjoying the dissection, though gave up after 90mins today as mouse bones are tiny and straining my eyes.
    That sounds so awesome, you could try and publish your work in a radiology journal too! I think everyone is floundering at the moment because with Medicine you get absolutely no lab skills and are sort of expected to pick it up very quickly because of the time constraints. Same with the lab, I'm trying to get as much done before the MSc students start in January as there's only one lab in which you can do a certain technique (comet assay) and so will have to start booking it then. How are you finding juggling lectures and modules too? I'd imagine you'll have a written exam at the end too? We have a thesis and a viva. Well you'll certainly be developing your manual dexterity for one I had to do 3 hours of comet assay scoring (where the comets... actually look like comets so in an odd poetic way its like looking at stars and I'm interested in Aerospace physiology and Space. But its nice and relaxing as you can just put your music on and just sit and score the DNA damage).

    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    So do you not have modules alongside or is your iBSc entirely research based? That sounds really interesting! Are you enjoying it so far? Sounds quite daunting to be dealing with patient samples - at least if I mess mine up, there's another mouse in the freezer! Is the aim to identify how much damage is occuring with a long term aim of figuring out how to prevent it?
    Nope, no modules/lectures. 100% research. Because I'm really interested in pursuing research after medicine (as well as clinical medicine), I thought that if I am going to take a year out then I want to immerse myself in research and really get to experience it in all its glory. (But little did I know how clumsy I am..)

    Yes it's scary because I have a cohort of 25 patients... and if I screw one up, it'll make a dent in my findings. Don't have a control cohort as such but because I'll be radiating the samples, we'll have an internal control.

    That is pretty much the aim:- to identify the patients who will go on to have the cardiac complications (as 5% of patients receiving radiotherapy have cardiovascular problems 10 years after radiotherapy), and try and put in place mechanisms to either bring in other interventions (like do they really require radiotherapy) or change their post treatment care - increased follow up, look for certain biomarkers to indicate disease etc.
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    Counting intercostal spaces is a *****. Lets hope all of my patients are cachexic.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Counting intercostal spaces is a *****.
    Please rate some other members before rating this member again. :yy:
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    It's kind of easier once you count down from the sternal angle as rib number 2
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    It's kind of easier once you count down from the sternal angle as rib number 2
    Angle of Louis :yep:
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Angle of Louis :yep:
    >_> was going to say angle of louis and then thought I'd get people complaining >_<

    You can't win
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    &gt;_&gt; was going to say angle of louis and then thought I'd get people complaining &gt;_&lt;

    You can't win
    Why would people complain? :confused:
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    >_> was going to say angle of louis and then thought I'd get people complaining >_<

    You can't win
    I prefer the manubriosternal joint.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Why would people complain? :confused:


    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I prefer the manubriosternal joint.
    Cos then people start bringing out all the names :/ :/ lol. Oh well
 
 
 
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