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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    (Original post by kited4)
    Also In Situ can reduce genetic diversity due to inbreeding therefore increase vulnerability to disease...
    Surely that'd be ex situ?
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    (Original post by lauren1brown)
    Does this reduce the gene pool?


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    In respect to one another, they are considered the same incentive.
    The mark schemes always put "genetic variation/gene pool" - so yes!



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    (Original post by Gotzz)
    Surely that'd be ex situ?
    yes sorry :P Ive been revising since 9am as i have 3 exams next week! my brain is frazzling! Think it's time to stop:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Ché.)
    In respect to one another, they are considered the same incentive.
    The mark schemes always put "genetic variation/gene pool" - so yes!



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    Ah great thanks


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    (Original post by Gotzz)
    Surely that'd be ex situ?
    Yeah Ex Situ is out of the species normal environment, in the case of an animal it would be in captivity, therfore less individuals, gene pool dramatically reduced by this fact alone, interbreeding also will take place through the generations
    All the individuals in captivity could be susceptible to the same particular disease, no resistance to the disease means the captive animals will be wiped out (the disease will also spread a lot faster if in a confined space)
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    What's the difference between a pathogen and parasite ?


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    (Original post by lauren1brown)
    What's the difference between a pathogen and parasite ?


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    A pathogen causes a disease
    A parasite lives on an organism e.g headlice

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    (Original post by lauren1brown)
    What's the difference between a pathogen and parasite ?


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    Pathogens are disease causing organisms
    Parasites are organisms which live in or on another livining organism causing harm to its host
    Parasites sometimes have pathogens in them


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    (Original post by lauren1brown)
    What's the difference between a pathogen and parasite ?


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    a pathogen is an organism that causes disease
    a parasite is an organism that lives in or on another living thing, causing harm from its host. A parasite usually benefits from this relationship as the host provides shelter, warmth and a means of transmission to another host
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    (Original post by lauren1brown)
    What's the difference between a pathogen and parasite ?


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    also
    parasites benefit from the host e.g gets nutrition, warmth, safety


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    Thanks everyone


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    What to we need to know about the division in to Bacteria and Archaea?


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    (Original post by wilkes14)
    What to we need to know about the division in to Bacteria and Archaea?


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    In terms of the classification systems?


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    (Original post by R1C3W1N3)
    Any help with the immune response, please?

    And I've gone through every exam, labelling all the questions about their subject and unit.
    So you can almost "predict" what might come up in Mondays exam
    That's so helpful, thanks


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    (Original post by Ché.)
    In terms of the classification systems?


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    Yeah! bit confused by the whole topic tbh :|
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    Can someone explain the structures of Starch and Glycogen to me.. I don't seem to know too much.
    Is this correct, and is there anything else I need to know?

    Starch:
    - a-glucose
    - Made from Amylose and Amylopectin. Amylose is straight chained with 1,4 glycosidic bonds and Amylopectin is branched with 1,4 and 1,4 glycosidic bonds. So overall it's branched? or?
    - Both are found in starch grains in chloroplasts and in amyloplasts in plants.
    - Both are an energy store in plants
    - Not soluble in water and therefore do not affect the water potential of the cell

    Glycogen:
    - a-glucose
    - 1,4 and 1,6 glycosidic bonds - branched
    - Energy store in animals
    - Granules are found in animal cells such as liver and muscle
    - Again, is not soluble in water - does not affect water potential of the cell.

    I came across a question that asked why glycogen makes a good storage molecule (3) How would you answer this? Thanks!
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    (Original post by tssf_skye)
    Can someone explain the structures of Starch and Glycogen to me.. I don't seem to know too much.
    Is this correct, and is there anything else I need to know?

    Starch:
    - a-glucose
    - Made from Amylose and Amylopectin. Amylose is straight chained with 1,4 glycosidic bonds and Amylopectin is branched with 1,4 and 1,4 glycosidic bonds. So overall it's branched? or?
    - Both are found in starch grains in chloroplasts and in amyloplasts in plants.
    - Both are an energy store in plants
    - Not soluble in water and therefore do not affect the water potential of the cell

    Glycogen:
    - a-glucose
    - 1,4 and 1,6 glycosidic bonds - branched
    - Energy store in animals
    - Granules are found in animal cells such as liver and muscle
    - Again, is not soluble in water - does not affect water potential of the cell.

    I came across a question that asked why glycogen makes a good storage molecule (3) How would you answer this? Thanks!
    That's correct

    Glycogen is a good storage molecule because:
    It does not affect the water potential of the cell as it is insoluble
    It is compact and can therefore store a lot of energy in the bonds
    It is highly branched which facilitates enzyme action of hydrolysis of the glycogen into glucose for respiration

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    (Original post by wilkes14)
    Yeah! bit confused by the whole topic tbh :|
    I am not quite sure what you want me to share exactly, but?
    I can say what I know we need to know around the topic...

    - the main thing around distinguishing the systems are:
    - The key differences between the (newly accepted) Domain system and the classical taxonomic hierarchy.

    BINOMIAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM:
    Taxonomy: - Illustrates the study of classification and where certain living organisms belong.
    This is much more traditional in the sense that it is closely observed via Phylogeny - the evolutionary relationships and ancestral divergence between living organisms.

    DOMAIN CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM:
    - Relies on molecular and DNA evidence highly - the domains actually imply this, anyway.
    - The lower hierarchy in this system stays the same - one of which is in the binomial system also.
    - Proposed in the first instance due the new molecular evidence towards the taxonomic process.




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    (Original post by wilkes14)
    What to we need to know about the division in to Bacteria and Archaea?


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    I hate this topic, so much. However, I believe we just need to know that in 1990 the 3 domain system was proposed it was found out that the structure of Bacteria is fundamentally different to that of Archaea and Eukaryotae (this was based on detailed research into RNA).
    Therefore the kingdom Prokaryotae was split into two groups: Archaea and Bacteria.

    So bacteria shows differences e.g.
    - It's cell membrane has a different structure
    - It uses different enzymes for DNA replication and RNA building
    - Has no proteins bound to its DNA
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    (Original post by Ché.)
    I am not quite sure what you want me to share exactly, but?
    I can say what I know we need to know around the topic...

    - the main thing around distinguishing the systems are:
    - The key differences between the (newly accepted) Domain system and the classical taxonomic hierarchy.

    BINOMIAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM:
    Taxonomy: - Illustrates the study of classification and where certain living organisms belong.
    This is much more traditional in the sense that it is closely observed via Phylogeny - the evolutionary relationships and ancestral divergence between living organisms.

    DOMAIN CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM:
    - Relies on molecular and DNA evidence highly - the domains actually imply this, anyway.
    - The lower hierarchy in this system stays the same - one of which is in the binomial system also.
    - Proposed in the first instance due the new molecular evidence towards the taxonomic process.

    - The membrane structure of the cells have varied structures;
    - The usage of different enzymes for DNA replication;
    - An absence of proteins that are attached to DNA strands.


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