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    You should really look into being a recruitment consultant... I sense you'd enjoy that and you can earn the type of money you want through commission.


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    Okay. I really need to stop coming to these forums. I realise now why nobody I know uses TSR...

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Okay. I really need to stop coming to these forums. I realise now why nobody I know uses TSR...

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    To be frank, in the long run you'd genuinely be so better off if you just concentrated on your AS retakes and A2 exams than spending time on here. I get the impression your obsession with status and money is exacerbated by this forum and, from what I've seen, it looks like it's got to an unhealthy, and counter-productive, level.
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Okay. I really need to stop coming to these forums. I realise now why nobody I know uses TSR...

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    Yet a lot of people who you aspire to be like do use these forums....


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    (Original post by Noble.)
    To be frank, in the long run you'd genuinely be so better off if you just concentrated on your AS retakes and A2 exams than spending time on here. I get the impression your obsession with status and money is exacerbated by this forum and, from what I've seen, it looks like it's got to an unhealthy, and counter-productive, level.
    I just use this site on my phone as I move around. Yeah, you're right. Lol, I barely used TSR till the beginning of April during revision, though that wasn't much. I really started using this site in June/at the end of the exams. Yeah, I've been a bit productive this summer too, but this place has become somewhere where I actually spend time now, and that's not great. I'm getting off here and these forums. Just asking questions there and then when I need to.

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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Yet a lot of people who you aspire to be like do use these forums....


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    No, I suppose. What I said above is more of what I meant.

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Do you mean corporate law lawyers with 3-5 years of experience/aged <30, earning 80/90k? Or do you mean senior ones earning only 90-90k? Earning 80-90k before 30 would be great. If you're not earning 125k+ as a junior one/after your conversion course, how many years of experience would you need to firmly be within 6 figures? I might consider doing a law conversion course to get into corporate law if I fail to get into banking (hopefully having done an economics degree from a top 10 uni, if not banking target), I might consider doing a law conversion course to get into corporate law, instead of finance... I'm quite good/passionate about expressing my opinions; at least, I'm articulate, to an extent.
    Well it all depends when you start work. Say you're 21 when you graduate, conversion plus LPC- two years, two years' training contract - you will be a lawyer at 25-26. It would also depend on what firm you worked for - some pay more than others.

    It's not about making speeches and good rhetoric though, that's being a barrister, not a City lawyer. What you need to get in is a 2:1 from a top 30 university, good extra-curriculars and a decent application form. It's tough but it's not rocket science. You need to be a team-player and a hard-worker.
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    (Original post by salterjo3)
    Well it all depends when you start work. Say you're 21 when you graduate, conversion plus LPC- two years, two years' training contract - you will be a lawyer at 25-26. It would also depend on what firm you worked for - some pay more than others.

    It's not about making speeches and good rhetoric though, that's being a barrister, not a City lawyer. What you need to get in is a 2:1 from a top 30 university, good extra-curriculars and a decent application form. It's tough but it's not rocket science. You need to be a team-player and a hard-worker.
    You make it sound a bit simpler to get to. Easier. I wouldn't mind being a lawyer. In fact, the job sounds just a little bit more interesting than banking (well, sales and BO banking, not MO operations, asset/wealth management, M&A/derivatives and other FO jobs like trading). The main theme here seems to be to just get to 'the top' in right kind of field (law, medicine, banking, finance and tech/IT/computing to an extent too). Apparently, it is harder to get into big, corporate law (where the money is) than banking... Do you need to do some sort of internship/work experience during university for law, like you do need to do for banking, btw?

    I wonder if people realise than one can still make a very decent and satisfying career (about 6 figures, probably more) if you get to the senior end of even BO banking. Sure, the senior end of FO is like £300k+, but even then being at about £100k (senior BO) isn't bad at all... So, if it's easier to get into BO banking than corporate law, I'll go for the former in all honesty.

    Final thing: you can progress to being a barrister, from City lawyer? Tbh I'm aware you can't unless you go to Oxbridge (lol at that article on the BBC today about how 75% of senior barristers went to Oxbridge). Not even asking that cos it would mean more money though, but simply cos, if I were in law, I WOULD want to put whatever skills I have in verbal communication/rhetoric to the test.
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    Either as a DBA (less likely) or as a BI Devloper (more likely).
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Final thing: you can progress to being a barrister, from City lawyer?Posted from TSR Mobile
    It is very very rare and isn't a "progression" as such, much more a side ways step.

    A small number of people move both ways between both professions but they have to have relevant experience to do that. There is a grey area where you can do advocacy as a solicitor too, but again that is something most lawyers don't do.

    And it is slightly different when you are looking at senior judges (mainly down to history and how long ago they studied), but you don't have to be an Oxbridge student to get into a career in law (either barrister or solicitor). It's a really bad myth that headlines like the one in the story you posted only help to keep fuelling.








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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    You make it sound a bit simpler to get to. Easier. I wouldn't mind being a lawyer. In fact, the job sounds just a little bit more interesting than banking (well, sales and BO banking, not MO operations, asset/wealth management, M&A/derivatives and other FO jobs like trading). The main theme here seems to be to just get to 'the top' in right kind of field (law, medicine, banking, finance and tech/IT/computing to an extent too). Apparently, it is harder to get into big, corporate law (where the money is) than banking... Do you need to do some sort of internship/work experience during university for law, like you do need to do for banking, btw?

    I wonder if people realise than one can still make a very decent and satisfying career (about 6 figures, probably more) if you get to the senior end of even BO banking. Sure, the senior end of FO is like £300k+, but even then being at about £100k (senior BO) isn't bad at all... So, if it's easier to get into BO banking than corporate law, I'll go for the former in all honesty.

    Final thing: you can progress to being a barrister, from City lawyer? Tbh I'm aware you can't unless you go to Oxbridge (lol at that article on the BBC today about how 75% of senior barristers went to Oxbridge). Not even asking that cos it would mean more money though, but simply cos, if I were in law, I WOULD want to put whatever skills I have in verbal communication/rhetoric to the test.
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    Those are VASTLY different groups that you've lumped together with that slash. Looks like you don't really know what each of those groups do.. Derivatives is within trading btw.

    And, FYI, Wealth Management is front office. They generate revenue.

    Well, for most magic circle firms it would be a good idea to apply for some kind of a Vac Scheme in your penultimate year these can either be during the summer or during the winter. If you are looking for the £97-100k PQ jobs then we're talking about ridiculously exclusive American firms some refer to the as 'white shoe' law firms these guys only take 1-5 people for training contracts every year.

    Em, senior end of FO is £1m+ including bonus (as bankers make the majority of their money from bonuses). If you get to head of division we're talking £5m+. £300k - £500k would be a reasonable base for an MD.

    You could always become a solicitor-advocate they have higher rights than normal solicitors and can represent clients in court.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Those are VASTLY different groups that you've lumped together with that slash. Looks like you don't really know what each of those groups do.. Derivatives is within trading btw.

    And, FYI, Wealth Management is front office. They generate revenue.

    Well, for most magic circle firms it would be a good idea to apply for some kind of a Vac Scheme in your penultimate year these can either be during the summer or during the winter. If you are looking for the £97-100k PQ jobs then we're talking about ridiculously exclusive American firms some refer to the as 'white shoe' law firms these guys only take 1-5 people for training contracts every year.

    Em, senior end of FO is £1m+ including bonus (as bankers make the majority of their money from bonuses). If you get to head of division we're talking £5m+. £300k - £500k would be a reasonable base for an MD.

    You could always become a solicitor-advocate they have higher rights than normal solicitors and can represent clients in court.
    I meant what roles I'd actually find 'fun'. I'm fully aware of what is FO/MO/BO. Hell, I've got what is literally a visual representation of banking from a director. Yeah, I know some bankers make millions, but some FO bankers make £300k and onwards (hence the +)... I meant it more as the salary once you've started to make it. Btw, heads of divisions make £5m+? Oh my... You may not believe me (in fact, don't), but I know the son of the head of derivatives at a bank... I've always been aware that he makes, alright, a mil+. But 5m+...? No wonder he's so... Ha. Haha. Wow.

    OK. This is pretty much my last post on TSR. I may very well delete my account soon, for multiple reasons. I've revealed too much about myself now, and this place is just another form of procrastination now, dammit.

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    I meant what roles I'd actually find 'fun'. I'm fully aware of what is FO/MO/BO. Hell, I've got what is literally a visual representation of banking from a director. Yeah, I know some bankers make millions, but some FO bankers make £300k and onwards (hence the +)... I meant it more as the salary once you've started to make it. Btw, heads of divisions make £5m+? Oh my... You may not believe me (in fact, don't), but I know the son of the head of derivatives at a bank... I've always been aware that he makes, alright, a mil+. But 5m+...? No wonder he's so... Ha. Haha. Wow.

    OK. This is pretty much my last post on TSR. I may very well delete my account soon, for multiple reasons. I've revealed too much about myself now, and this place is just another form of procrastination now, dammit.

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    £300k is what a VP would make and they are usually 29-31 - depending on when you started. Have you seen this: Michael Page Financial Services Salary Survey

    Bonus is percentage of salary:
    For M&A at the VP level the high end of the base salary is £140k and the high end of the bonus is 150% - total comp: £350k

    I believe you - I know an SVP at BP, a partner at CD&R (PE Firm), some bankers at BNP Paribas and a couple others who trade oil and gas at prop firms/in-house at supermajors.

    These are people my dad knew, friends' parents, people I have networked with and I sooo envy their kids.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    £300k is what a VP would make and they are usually 29-31 - depending on when you started. Have you seen this: Michael Page Financial Services Salary Survey

    Bonus is percentage of salary:
    For M&A at the VP level the high end of the base salary is £140k and the high end of the bonus is 150% - total comp: £350k

    I believe you - I know an SVP at BP, a partner at CD&R (PE Firm), some bankers at BNP Paribas and a couple others who trade oil and gas at prop firms/in-house at supermajors.

    These are people my dad knew, friends' parents, people I have networked with and I sooo envy their kids.
    Wow man... Now I see why they can all live in Belsize Park and Hampstead (City people here in London that is). You have no idea what Hampstead is like, and what it's become. The houses there are all £1.5m+ essentially.

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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It is very very rare and isn't a "progression" as such, much more a side ways step.

    A small number of people move both ways between both professions but they have to have relevant experience to do that. There is a grey area where you can do advocacy as a solicitor too, but again that is something most lawyers don't do.

    And it is slightly different when you are looking at senior judges (mainly down to history and how long ago they studied), but you don't have to be an Oxbridge student to get into a career in law (either barrister or solicitor). It's a really bad myth that headlines like the one in the story you posted only help to keep fuelling.








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    I agree, but I still think it is harder to become a barrister than to get into the City. Wisefire is also interested in the salary particularly and, as Rumpole so famously says, barristers are "taxis for hire" - if they have a dry period of work there is no safety net and no guaranteed income, and of course they have lots of outgoings. Some are on incredible incomes, some are turning the radiators down in their chambers to save on the heating bills.

    As to doing your Higher Rights and advocating for your client, yes, you can and some litigation departments will fund your course to help you get this, but iin practice it comes down to the question "am I the best person to be advocating on this matter for my client or would they be better served by a barrister who does this every day?" The conclusion is almost always to instruct a barrister. You have to put your client first.

    To decide which way to go, you really need to do some work experience as they are very different jobs. Personally, I think being a barrister is rather lonely.
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    (Original post by jamalziane)
    What job did you do or are you an entrepreneur?

    Also what experience and qualifications did you have beforehand.
    Telesales manager. A few years telesales experience and no qualifications.
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    If I had the time/willing to hide every suggestive/identifiable detail about me on a P60/tax returns form, I'd publish it here,
    It took me all of 15 seconds to resize the window and delete the NI number.

    I'm sure a genius such as yourself could do it in a fraction of that time
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    (Original post by Crazy92)
    I would say I'm relatively inspirational to someone from my background,
    Wow. Did that really just come out of your mouth?
 
 
 
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