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    (Original post by Olympiad)
    Hi everybody! How are you all doing?

    I was wondering whether anybody could help me with my A2 Politics essay - it's a 45 marker and I'm fairly stuck on what to be writing about.

    To what extent has federalism been eroded under the G.W. bush and Obama presidencies?

    I was planning on doing a HAS/HASN'T for Bush, then again for Obama - but content wise/ I'm not really sure what I should be writing.


    Any help would be really appreciated
    Hello to you and I'm just having a cup of tea whilst passing on the way to doing some shopping.

    Regardless of your views on it, Obamacare would be an example of federalism being reduced/eroded.

    On the referendum outcome, my (sensible I hope) thoughts.

    Alex Salmond resigning is no great surprise, only perhaps quicker than I expected. David Cameron probably would have resigned in the event of a yes vote. What I think now happens is that the powers for the Scottish Parliament and who decides English only matters will become a significant election issue in May's general election.

    It won't happen, but I would prefer proper federalism. So that would mean an English parliament, and all four devolved administrations having the same powers and in general the taxes they raise funding those areas of responsibilities. You would not need 650 MPs for the UK parliament (perhaps 200 would be more than adequate) and only say 300 for the English Parliament.

    Defence, foreign policy, overseas development, passports/border control, maritime/coastguard, the currency union, things like the BBC/broadcasting are part of the UK parliament's remit, all others are part of the devolved Parliaments.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    Nope, it's the Herald Building. Unionists are currently rioting, burning Saltires, singing racist anti-Catholic songs and it seems setting fire to a building because one of their papers dared to support independence. Who'd have thought that the "nationalists" who lost seem content to respect democracy whereas the definitely-not-nationalists supporting the union need violence to assert their reaffirmed authority.

    (Original post by Jean-Luc Picard)
    Unionists as classy as ever then, so ironic they call their enemies nationalists when Unionism is just a worse form of nationalism itself.

    (Original post by Mechie)
    I couldn't have said it any better myself. And to think they had the cheek throughout the campaign to say that Yes supporters were nasty and violent.
    Really disappointed you've all decided to blame all unionists like this. Childish response to a nasty incident.

    Also the fire wasn't at the Herald, and it wasn't caused by thugs - it was an electrical fault at a club nearby, confirmed by the Herald's Twitter account.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Regardless of your views on it, Obamacare would be an example of federalism being reduced/eroded.
    Considering the standardization of medicaid and private medical insurance across the US, it's an example of federalism not federalism being reduced. Actually in thinking about it, a lot of Obama's championed laws are a step towards tighter federalization that not.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Really disappointed you've all decided to blame all unionists like this. Childish response to a nasty incident.
    It's a satisfying response after months of No campaign propaganda portraying Yes supporters as violent and intimidating. Though clearly, it's a minority in both cases.

    Another thought: a yes-supporting friend of mine was arguing yesterday that the No campaign has been very naive to portray further devolution as being a simple, easy process. The constitutional quagmire Westminster is entering will be anything but simple. I genuinely hope it can end somewhere that the majority of people are happy with - I supported independence, but I don't want to see the country end in a crumbling constitutional nightmare - though I have my doubts as to whether any of the major parties is capable of seeing through the reform needed. A constitutional convention is definitely a good idea at this stage.
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    It's a satisfying response after months of No campaign propaganda portraying Yes supporters as violent and intimidating. Though clearly, it's a minority in both cases.
    I won't try and start a debate on the matter, but what I will say is that this campaign has seen politics at its worst. Word-twisting, propaganda and bullying from both sides.
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    A constitutional convention is definitely a good idea at this stage.
    When? Autumn of 2015 as Labour are saying? That just isn't going to cut it, when their campaign slogan was "faster, better, safer change". Their own timetable promised a motion before parliament for more powers to Scotland, which would be agreed on by both parties, the day after a no vote. This didn't happen. Their promises have been shown up to be an utter lie less than 24 hours after the vote. We have been promised a new Scotland bill voted on by parliament before the next UK election. A "constitutional convention" will take years, and just kick the issue into the long grass.

    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Really disappointed you've all decided to blame all unionists like this. Childish response to a nasty incident.
    I don't blame all unionists for this, of course. We've been told for months that nasty, narrow nationalism is on the yes side - I think you'll find worse pro-British nationalism on the no side than the friendly, vibrant, positive message of the yes campaign, on the whole. We've been tarred as nasty nationalists by very prominent members of the no campaign, Jim Murphy for one, when a small minority have done stupid things like throw eggs. If a few stupid, isolated acts can be used to tar the yes campaign, you can't close your eyes and ignore the acts of a few stupid unionists by the same measure.

    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    I won't try and start a debate on the matter, but what I will say is that this campaign has seen politics at its worst. Word-twisting, propaganda and bullying from both sides.
    This debate has been the best thing to happen in politics for years. Unprecedented levels of people have been keen to get involved in politics for the first time in their lives, it's simply untrue to say this is bad politics.
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    (Original post by Mechie)


    This debate has been the best thing to happen in politics for years. Unprecedented levels of people have been keen to get involved in politics for the first time in their lives, it's simply untrue to say this is bad politics.
    Bad politics and popular politics are not mutually exclusive. The referendum itself way a great success, the campaign wasn't, it's an important distinction. Both sides were incredibly manipulative. Far more so than in a normal election, it was increasingly difficult to separate facts from spin (e.g. Yes Scotland taking Darling's statement that Scotland could use the pound like Panama uses the dollar out of context), which led to the No campaign being increasingly able to exploit the uncertainty. From my perspective the campaigns were not worthy of the referendum they fought.
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    (Original post by nebelbon)
    Haha :P

    The government won't change, they don't have to - they 'won'.

    I hope that we see a surge in referendums across the globe. There are already reports of a referendum hopefully happening in Kashmir.
    The people already exercise their democracy by voting in national elections. Such a referendum shouldn't happen. The international community, if it wishes to learn about breeding terrorism, should encourage ALL of Kashmir to integrate into India.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Really disappointed you've all decided to blame all unionists like this. Childish response to a nasty incident.
    Rangers have not been playing Celtic in the Scottish League since HMRC bankrupted Rangers (I cannot unfortunately prove my belief why that happened, which if I could would mean reporting one of HMRC's former employers to the Police).

    So the fairly small unpleasant element of Rangers fans who sing nasty songs probably used the no vote as an excuse for the behaviour yesterday..
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    Considering the standardization of medicaid and private medical insurance across the US, it's an example of federalism not federalism being reduced. Actually in thinking about it, a lot of Obama's championed laws are a step towards tighter federalization that not.
    You are right, me typing too quickly whilst having a nice cup of tea!
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Rangers have not been playing Celtic in the Scottish League since HMRC bankrupted Rangers (I cannot unfortunately prove my belief why that happened, which if I could would mean reporting one of HMRC's former employers to the Police).

    So the fairly small unpleasant element of Rangers fans who sing nasty songs probably used the no vote as an excuse for the behaviour yesterday..
    Legia Warsaw fans still out for revenge perhaps?
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Really disappointed you've all decided to blame all unionists like this. Childish response to a nasty incident.

    Also the fire wasn't at the Herald, and it wasn't caused by thugs - it was an electrical fault at a club nearby, confirmed by the Herald's Twitter account.
    I didn't say all unionists. However, it was people waving Union Jacks, singing God Save the Queen and holding Better Together/No Thanks campaign material - I think it's fair to say they came from the unionist side, and I'm disgusted that we haven't seen Darling, Brown or anyone else who were apparently so afraid of the division the referendum would cause come out to condemn it.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    Brown is still a right ****ing arse
    Agreed. Still only right to recognise his contribution though, I would have been heartbroken had there been a yes vote.
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    Been having a browse in the MHoC History pages and have noticed that there seems to be some inaccuracies surrounding the 2010 governments. I took over from Afcwimbledon2 as prime minister towards the end of May 2010 (certainly after the election) and stood down in August 2010 when the first renegotiation was held.
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    Chuka Umunna absolutely terrified of labour candidates being called left wing on the Sunday Politics :facepalm:
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    (Original post by DaveSmith99)
    Chuka Umunna absolutely terrified of labour candidates being called left wing on the Sunday Politics :facepalm:
    I'm about 20 minutes behind but that's not a shock, he's a pretty blatant Blairite when he's off line.

    Though I actually consider him the greatest Labour threat right now for that reason.
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    Ed Miliband: "I have a new super radical policy to increase minimum wage! Ready to hear? We're putting it up to £8! Hear that? £8! ...By 2020..."

    I sincerely hope his Scottish devolution proposals aren't as weak as that.
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    Ed Miliband: "I have a new super radical policy to increase minimum wage! Ready to hear? We're putting it up to £8! Hear that? £8! ...By 2020..."

    I sincerely hope his Scottish devolution proposals aren't as weak as that.
    not to mention their commitment to even more benefit cuts will mean for many on the minimum wage it won't even make much of a difference, heck if inflation starts going up again it won't do much at all in fact. also no guarantee they will even do this, it's something they want to do over a 5 year parliament, can easily see that being pushed back if the economy isn't growing enough for their rich buddies.

    right now it looks like the devolution won't even happen cause Labour/Tories are at loggerheads over it...
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    Ed Miliband: "I have a new super radical policy to increase minimum wage! Ready to hear? We're putting it up to £8! Hear that? £8! ...By 2020..."

    I sincerely hope his Scottish devolution proposals aren't as weak as that.
    Aye, that's really disappointing from Ed. The optimist in me says that he intends to go further faster but is leaving himself some wiggle room.
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    Cameron has made a clever move. Labour are trapped, they cannot please both the English and the Scots.

    Here is to a Tory-UKIP coalition in 2015!
 
 
 
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