Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I took one in the sac a few years back. I didn't do much about it, I don't think mine was as bad as that guys though. Bit of swelling and a bruise. Hurt like nothing I've ever felt before though.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Syncope)
    It does feel like forever - the novelty of being in medical school has worn off, but the really interesting stuff hasn't started yet, so it just seems like day after endless day of lectures stretching before you...

    Don't panic, it will end! Like I said, just keep ploughing through it.

    Final year's going fine so far, thanks; I'm in GP for the first rotation which is interesting but can be a bit isolating as you're all in different places. F1 applications are over and done with too so I can relax (sort of) until the allocations are announced in December. And yes, I intercalated between second and third years.
    I am trying! Even my SSC seems so much harder than I first thought it would be, haha. Good luck with your application, let us know how it goes! If you don't mind me asking, what did you intercalate in and why? I'm 100% sure I want to intercalate next year, but I'm just having such a nightmare deciding what exactly it is I'd like to do
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Took my first femoral stab Very satisfying stuff that!

    Was quite fun today practicing airway management (Guedels, LMAs and ETTs etc) on manikins. Probably slightly less scary than the real thing though!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I chickened out of doing an ABG today. But then the patient had apparently had someone have 3 goes and failed earlier in the day so me learning on them didn't seem fair really.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Got absolutely merked by a formative GI exam today. Not good.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    two hours on health inequalities.. come on now :goodnight:
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Surprise formative anatomy exam on thursday, thanks for giving us a long 1 day of notice med school...
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by gozatron)
    Surprise formative anatomy exam on thursday, thanks for giving us a long 1 day of notice med school...
    At least it's formative :lazy:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I hate MDT cases.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I hate MDT cases.
    Apparently we have to do some sort of 'online session' with student nurses, physios, SLTs etc. I'm told that it is essentially a medic bashing session. Can't wait.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Yuck assessment day tomorrow - i know nothing am not afraid to admit it. I think i might send in a third year dressed as me, they would probably do a much better job!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Apparently we have to do some sort of 'online session' with student nurses, physios, SLTs etc. I'm told that it is essentially a medic bashing session. Can't wait.
    Well I want to ***** about social services for 2000 words but it wont get me a good mark :p:
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Apparently we have to do some sort of 'online session' with student nurses, physios, SLTs etc. I'm told that it is essentially a medic bashing session. Can't wait.
    We did something similar, but in person. It is definitely a medic bashing session, esp cos all the non-medic health people are based at a different uni to us, so they hate us equally for being from AU as well as for being medics
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Just found out about the new Proton Beam Therapy centres that should be coming to UCLH (and Manchester too I think)...

    Amazing stuff: supposed to cost £200million, be 5 stories high, 3 of which being taken up by the 100 tonne, 12+ metre gantries, supplied by a 200 tonne cyclotron which would consume more power than there is available in the whole west-end - all of this to treat one patient at a time!! :eek:

    :borat:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tech)
    Just found out about the new Proton Beam Therapy centres that should be coming to UCLH (and Manchester too I think)...

    Amazing stuff: supposed to cost £200million, be 5 stories high, 3 of which being taken up by the 100 tonne, 12+ metre gantries, supplied by a 200 tonne cyclotron which would consume more power than there is available in the whole west-end - all of this to treat one patient at a time!! :eek:

    :borat:
    What does it do?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by crazylemon)
    What does it do?
    It's a new kind of radiotherapy setup. Most radiotherapy is done using Linacs (linear accelerators) which fire electrons through a target to produce x-rays... the x-rays then deliver the dose to the tissue to be treated.

    The percentage dose depth graph for x-rays (purple) isn't very good:



    So basically this means your x-rays aren't good at being stopped by your tissues, so there'll be quite a few passing through your tumour and irradiating healthy tissue. The proton beams (green - red is carbon which also would be used I think) on the other hand are totally stopped almost immediately after delivering their maximum dose.

    You could treat something like a glioma around the spinal cord without delivering any dose the spinal cord at all... very useful for young children, who are particularly susceptible to negative effects of radiation (this is going to be used mostly by Great Ormond St.)
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tech)
    Just found out about the new Proton Beam Therapy centres that should be coming to UCLH (and Manchester too I think)...

    Amazing stuff: supposed to cost £200million, be 5 stories high, 3 of which being taken up by the 100 tonne, 12+ metre gantries, supplied by a 200 tonne cyclotron which would consume more power than there is available in the whole west-end - all of this to treat one patient at a time!! :eek:

    :borat:
    Are they building a power station next door? Or just intending to black-out part of the city every time they need to treat someone?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tech)
    It's a new kind of radiotherapy setup. Most radiotherapy is done using Linacs (linear accelerators) which fire electrons through a target to produce x-rays... the x-rays then deliver the dose to the tissue to be treated.

    The percentage dose depth graph for x-rays (purple) isn't very good:



    So basically this means your x-rays aren't good at being stopped by your tissues, so there'll be quite a few passing through your tumour and irradiating healthy tissue. The proton beams (green - red is carbon which also would be used I think) on the other hand are totally stopped almost immediately after delivering their maximum dose.

    You could treat something like a glioma around the spinal cord without delivering any dose the spinal cord at all... very useful for young children, who are particularly susceptible to negative effects of radiation (this is going to be used mostly by Great Ormond St.)
    This seems hideously expensive to treat a few people. Cool though.
    How are they stopped by the site though? and do they cause any damage getting there?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Are they building a power station next door? Or just intending to black-out part of the city every time they need to treat someone?
    Good question, from what I gather they're going to dig up half of central london to get new lines put in from elsewhere... obviously makes it very expensive to treat (around £30k per treatment) due to running costs.


    (Original post by crazylemon)
    This seems hideously expensive to treat a few people. Cool though.
    How are they stopped by the site though? and do they cause any damage getting there?
    Yeah it's super expensive, that's why it's taken so long for us to get some, but the people that it can treat would otherwise have no hope, and it should in theory be almost completely effective.

    From what I understand of it, protons are big chunky particles... The dose they deliver on their way to the tumour is pretty low (not zero, they will do some damage in getting there but no more than x-rays do on the way in) and it's low because they're moving quickly... so in any given volume near the surface, they won't have much chance to interact with the healthy tissue, because before you know it they've moved on.

    As they get further in the tissue, they'll be travelling more slowly - so the length of time they spend in deeper volumes is increased, meaning they have more of a chance to deliver their dose at the deeper parts. The dose drops off to zero because I believe the protons are literally stopped in the tumour.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tech)
    Good question, from what I gather they're going to dig up half of central london to get new lines put in from elsewhere... obviously makes it very expensive to treat (around £30k per treatment) due to running costs.



    Yeah it's super expensive, that's why it's taken so long for us to get some, but the people that it can treat would otherwise have no hope, and it should in theory be almost completely effective.

    From what I understand of it, protons are big chunky particles... The dose they deliver on their way to the tumour is pretty low (not zero, they will do some damage in getting there but no more than x-rays do on the way in) and it's low because they're moving quickly... so in any given volume near the surface, they won't have much chance to interact with the healthy tissue, because before you know it they've moved on.

    As they get further in the tissue, they'll be travelling more slowly - so the length of time they spend in deeper volumes is increased, meaning they have more of a chance to deliver their dose at the deeper parts. The dose drops off to zero because I believe the protons are literally stopped in the tumour.
    Sorry I was more interested in the how the tumor stops them (As a tumor will be made up of broadly the same squishy stuff as the tissue surrounding it so I can't see them just stopping dead) or whether it is a case foucusing the beam and some wave/particle duality shiz. I should probably be asking my physics friends this.....

    As for costs well we will see. 200mil buys a lot of other treatment.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.