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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Every time I watch Grey's Anatomy I want to throw stuff at the TV, so I haven't seen that episode. :p:
    I find that I throw far less than if I watch Holby City, and there is the soothing effect of Patrick Dempsey :love:
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I find that I throw far less than if I watch Holby City, and there is the soothing effect of Patrick Dempsey :love:
    He does nothing for me, I'm afraid. Plus they're all just SO whiny and annoying and ridiculous. Argh!
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I presume it's not the same as when Izzie had to open up a sternotomy out of theatre in Grey's Anatomy? :daydreaming:
    I'm sure a heart in an elevator would be more thrilling :ninja:
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    How the heck we're meant to remember stuff like the structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (amongst a million other little things) is beyond me.. And the reasons behind learning stuff like that just seems pointless.

    Workload in medicine is mad :/
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    (Original post by Miss Purple)
    Ohh noo, the course is taught in English, I get lessons in Slovak so that I'm coherent enough for clinical years (which seems like a lifetime away). While I pay 2 arms and a frontal lobe in tuition the Slovaks get their education for free :dry: I'd say I've come terms with the fact that beggars can't be choosers. Aww thanks, but I think I'll be brave once if I manage to survive the 6 years
    But if the course is taught in English, how do the non English speaking slovaks understand Coherency in 3 years on top of med school-have fun! I guess you are amongst native speakers though. How are you paying for it? Is it just the English who pay extortionate fees for our education - it seems like everywhere else is free or minimally priced... Is there a certain quota for those allowed to go into the next year? How are you finding it in general?

    (Original post by Beska)
    Exam :afraid:
    I remember that...

    (Original post by RollerBall)
    This metabolism... I don't even...

    I'm seriously struggling with this years metabolism. Specifically the biochemistry /pharmacology of insulin, glucose, fats etc. There just seem to five thousand receptors and ligands with 50 different steps in between. I'm having real difficulty keeping concentration in lectures as they just pile acronyms on us.

    Anyone reccommend some books with clear, easy diagrams or videos on the net showing the pathways? It doesn't help Ive forgotten essentially all of metabolism from last year bar the key concepts.
    http://web.expasy.org/cgi-bin/pathwa..._thumbnails.pl :giggle:


    (Original post by Skwee)
    I wasn't actually offered sedation [SIZE="1"](probably because I was scheduled off-the-record on a next-day basis)[/SIZE], I got some lidocaine gel rubbed on the evil spaghetti string of doom which supposedly helped (lolz).
    Why were you having it done?

    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Wish there was another clinical cases thread. The last one was fun until it broke out into WW3.
    :sadnod:

    (Original post by Helenia)
    Every time I watch Grey's Anatomy I want to throw stuff at the TV, so I haven't seen that episode. :p:
    Is there actually any medicine in the show, it seems more like how many different ways can we partner up these 20 characters...

    Question - What's the longest ward round you've been on?
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    Question - What's the longest ward round you've been on?
    Four and a half hours, on work experience on AMAU :sigh: That may have been the day that I decided that medicine was not for me, and surgery was :yes:
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    (Original post by englishman129)
    How the heck we're meant to remember stuff like the structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (amongst a million other little things) is beyond me.. And the reasons behind learning stuff like that just seems pointless.

    Workload in medicine is mad :/
    Going from learning broad concepts in A Level biology that you could blag in the exam, to learning the random facts & figures & detail expected of us in the formative MCD exam was tricky!

    However, you'll soon get a feel for what they want you to learn (which admittedly is still a lot) and, perhaps more crucially, you'll find a better way of learning it all.
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    Anyone feel they know less science as they go further on ?

    My clinical judgement skills improve daily ( I can look at someone and go oh **** they need A&E, this guy is ill but can be treated slow time, this guy is well), but I literally am forgetting every bit of basic science I ever learnt....... :/ :/
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    (Original post by Blatant Troll)
    Going from learning broad concepts in A Level biology that you could blag in the exam, to learning the random facts & figures & detail expected of us in the formative MCD exam was tricky!

    However, you'll soon get a feel for what they want you to learn (which admittedly is still a lot) and, perhaps more crucially, you'll find a better way of learning it all.
    How did you revise the lecture slides? Just reading them again and again or writing notes/copying stuff out? Still not entirely sure what method to use. I want to be efficient but it feels like you're doing nothing just reading lol

    And can you blag epidemiology/sociology and not attend lectures?
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    Had to download a trial version of M$ Office 2010 because refworks/write-in-cite won't work on the open source LibreOffice.

    Meh, I'll just crack Office 2010 later. (not rly)(rly)(don't tell Gates)

    I used to have a cracked version of Office 2007 but I've since formatted my laptop so lost it.
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    Question - What's the longest ward round you've been on?

    Ward Round Me (FY2) started off actually taking all day.
    It was care of the elderly, kept getting sucked into doing jobs as we went along & we had patients over 7 wards or so (orthogeri / surgical geri link team)...
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Had to download a trial version of M$ Office 2010 because refworks/write-in-cite won't work on the open source LibreOffice.

    Meh, I'll just crack Office 2010 later. (not rly)(rly)(don't tell Gates)

    I used to have a cracked version of Office 2007 but I've since formatted my laptop so lost it.
    You use reference software? I just do them manually :dontknow:
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    (Original post by englishman129)
    How the heck we're meant to remember stuff like the structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (amongst a million other little things) is beyond me.. And the reasons behind learning stuff like that just seems pointless.
    I'm all for learning the science properly, but that is just laughably ridiculous.
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    (Original post by Lantana)

    Question - What's the longest ward round you've been on?

    All day continuous - acute medical ward.

    On a different note - why cant i sleep? Its nearly 2am and im wide awake, need to be in hospital in 6 hours time.
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    Brb, tying rope.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    You use reference software? I just do them manually :dontknow:
    As fiddly as refworks/write-in-cite is to set up and start using, it's DRASTICALLY easier and faster than trying to write essays/reviews manually putting in references. You basically find papers on pubmed, save the references on your refworks account. When writing a paper, click in where you want to pop in a citation, write-in-cite will automatically enter in the citation in any format you want (ie number or surname etc) and automatically generate the reference list at the end in whatever format you need (Harvard, Vancouver etc). If you've done them numbered, like Imperial and most institutions want us to do, and not by surname, it automatically orders all the citations and references. This becomes much more important if you've written quite a bit and then go back to add or remove a citation. It also becomes important if you've got 20-30 references in a paper.

    I can't even imagine how much time I'd waste trying to do it manually. This is my BSc year so I'm going to probably going to be referencing hundreds and hundreds of papers this year. (will not read hundreds and hundreds of papers though )
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    Anyone feel they know less science as they go further on ?

    My clinical judgement skills improve daily ( I can look at someone and go oh **** they need A&E, this guy is ill but can be treated slow time, this guy is well), but I literally am forgetting every bit of basic science I ever learnt....... :/ :/
    Yes. VERY yes! My goodness, I keep reading on here about people ranting because they cant remember the chemical formula for pyruvate kinases and such and here I am racking my brains over really, really simple basic science that I probably knew even at school, let alone pre-clinical/undergraduate!

    One of our O&G lecturers gave me a quite personal brief on the importance of knowing anatomy and physiology as a doctor, so I began to read through a physiology textbook. This lasted about 4 days before I gave up and stuck to Medicine at a Glance
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    (Original post by SMed)
    I can't even imagine how much time I'd waste trying to do it manually. This is my BSc year so I'm going to probably going to be referencing hundreds and hundreds of papers this year. (will not read hundreds and hundreds of papers though )
    Haha...yeah, it's an absolute godsend on dissertations and projects when you stumble across "Special Editions" of journals focussing completely on your topic This happened to me during my BSc dissertation and I was completely sorted!
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    Anyone feel they know less science as they go further on ?

    My clinical judgement skills improve daily ( I can look at someone and go oh **** they need A&E, this guy is ill but can be treated slow time, this guy is well), but I literally am forgetting every bit of basic science I ever learnt....... :/ :/
    “Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”
    -Carl 'The ****ing Legend' Sagan
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    (Original post by englishman129)
    How the heck we're meant to remember stuff like the structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (amongst a million other little things) is beyond me.. And the reasons behind learning stuff like that just seems pointless.

    Workload in medicine is mad :/
    Wait until year 2!! :ahee:
 
 
 
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