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Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? Watch

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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    You can send your child to an independent schools relatively easily on 60k, thats upper middle class.
    Upper middle class schools charge around £40k per year.
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    (Original post by speedbird)
    Upper middle class schools charge around £40k per year.
    WOW! How much do boarders pay!?!
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    (Original post by Quady)
    WOW! How much do boarders pay!?!
    At the top schools, that's how much boarders pay. That's about £100 per day.
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    Law?

    (I hope so anyway :mmm:)
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    (Original post by speedbird)
    At the top schools, that's how much boarders pay. That's about £100 per day.
    Right...

    So for an all so ran day pupil could it be done on a 60k wage? (which is what the poster mean I think)
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    (Original post by speedbird)
    Upper middle class schools charge around £40k per year.
    That's the price of the absolute most expensive private schools, really. Most private schools will be cheaper than that.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Right...

    So for an all so ran day pupil could it be done on a 60k wage? (which is what the poster mean I think)
    £40k a year?! That's more than Eton lol.

    It's between £15k and £20k per year for pretty much all good private schools. Add in other costs to do with the school throughout the year, and let's just say it costs £18k a year.

    A £60k salary is a £41k a year salary after tax, NI and a 6% pension. If your partner also brought in £60k a year, you'd have a total, real household income of £82k a year. Factor in mortgage/utilities/other costs eating up maybe 65% of your income per month (after tax), and you'd thus have only £28.7k (call it £28k) left on actual luxuries for the whole year.

    £18k of £28k on money for 'luxuries', taken up solely to take one child to a private school, is a lot. To answer your question, two people/partners on £60k can indeed just about take their children to a private school. But you'll barely save ANYTHING throughout the year. You'll have enough for holidays from that £10k left to spend on luxuries. But you CANNOT save. And that's more important than anything else. Want an £80k car? You won't have it on two £60k incomes if you take one child to a private school (unless you save for 8-20 years, which is just a depressing thought lol).

    What I would personally do is treat myself whilst I'm young, then think of having kids. I want that £80k car, for example. I'd like to be saving £2k a month just for it every month... I've got to get a 6 figure salary, personally. Hopefully before I'm 35 or so ABSOLUTE max (will be much, much sooner if I get into the City). I've genuinely got to wifey a nice, old money girl who herself is well educated and on a good income lol.

    Sacrifice by getting a cheaper property/less luxuries, but yes: TWO £60k incomes even in London is theoretically JUST enough to send ONE child to a private school.

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    £40k a year?! That's more than Eton lol.

    It's between £15k and £20k per year for pretty much all good private schools. Add in other costs to do with the school throughout the year, and let's just say it costs £18k a year.

    A £60k salary is a £41k a year salary after tax, NI and a 6% pension. If your partner also brought in £60k a year, you'd have a total, real household income of £82k a year. Factor in mortgage/utilities/other costs eating up maybe 65% of your income per month (after tax), and you'd thus have only £28.7k (call it £28k) left on actual luxuries for the whole year.

    £18k of £28k on money for 'luxuries', taken up solely to take one child to a private school, is a lot. To answer your question, two people/partners on £60k can indeed just about take their children to a private school. But you'll barely save ANYTHING throughout the year. You'll have enough for holidays from that £10k left to spend on luxuries. But you CANNOT save. And that's more important than anything else. Want an £80k car? You won't have it on two £60k incomes if you take one child to a private school (unless you save for 8-20 years, which is just a depressing thought lol).

    What I would personally do is treat myself whilst I'm young, then think of having kids. I want that £80k car, for example. I'd like to be saving £2k a month just for it every month... I've got to get a 6 figure salary, personally. Hopefully before I'm 35 or so ABSOLUTE max (will be much, much sooner if I get into the City). I've genuinely got to wifey a nice, old money girl who herself is well educated and on a good income lol.

    Sacrifice by getting a cheaper property/less luxuries, but yes: TWO £60k incomes even in London is theoretically JUST enough to send ONE child to a private school.

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    Why do you do such futile in-depth analyses of income? Doing all of that from the assumption that 65% of your income is going to be taken up by general living costs is just a waste of time, especially considering the ridiculous variations on what proportions of people's income essentially gets used up each month (even for people on the same salary, living in the same area, leading similar lives). Also, no-one in their right mind buys an £80,000 car outright unless they're sitting on a load of money they themselves didn't have to work for. The majority of people who 'buy' vehicles of that value will do so through finance/company car.

    If you're desperate to earn 6-figures, you're much better off spending your time finding out what you're good at and concentrating on GCSEs/A-Levels, as opposed to pointlessly trying to mould yourself into being someone that you perceive as having a higher probability of earning 6-figures.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Why do you do such futile in-depth analyses of income? Doing all of that from the assumption that 65% of your income is going to be taken up by general living costs is just a waste of time, especially considering the ridiculous variations on what proportions of people's income essentially gets used up each month (even for people on the same salary, living in the same area, leading similar lives). Also, no-one in their right mind buys an £80,000 car outright unless they're sitting on a load of money they themselves didn't have to work for. The majority of people who 'buy' vehicles of that value will do so through finance/company car.

    If you're desperate to earn 6-figures, you're much better off spending your time finding out what you're good at and concentrating on GCSEs/A-Levels, as opposed to pointlessly trying to mould yourself into being someone that you perceive as having a higher probability of earning 6-figures.
    I agree with you, and I was just giving my ideas/take on his question. Of course financing exists, but I'd still much rather save up, as running costs on top of the near £1k finance deal would just be too much. I'm also aware of how big a waste of money it is (£50k+ losses), but I'd be willing to do that.

    Yeah anyway, you're right.

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    I agree with you, and I was just giving my ideas/take on his question. Of course financing exists, but I'd still much rather save up, as running costs on top of the near £1k finance deal would just be too much. I'm also aware of how big a waste of money it is (£50k+ losses), but I'd be willing to do that.

    Yeah anyway, you're right.

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    The UK used car market is one of (if not) the cheapest in the whole of Europe. You get can a hell of a lot of cars that were originally ~£80k new for less than £30k after couple of years (just a few examples: BMW 7 series, X5. Jaguar XJ. S-Class (although Mercs tend to hold their value a lot better than their German rivals) - you can even new-age Bentleys for under £30k)
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    The UK used car market is one of (if not) the cheapest in the whole of Europe. You get can a hell of a lot of cars that were originally ~£80k new for less than £30k after couple of years (just a few examples: BMW 7 series, X5. Jaguar XJ. S-Class (although Mercs tend to hold their value a lot better than their German rivals) - you can even new-age Bentleys for under £30k)
    I'm (pretty much) very, very aware of all that, and believe me, I've wasted yet more time on Autotrader and the likes, looking at used cars. But honestly, I have a particular 'dream', with a car which has some particular specifications that cannot be found on the used market; and, in some respects, part of the point of it all is for it to be new. My logic's a bit reversed on this. I'd equally consider the used car market for most cars which have original prices up to about £55k. From then on, I actually wouldn't (unless the car's a hypercar/£130k+, which I don't care for or aspire to).

    Thanks for your time, lol.

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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    With the globalization and the growth of multinational companies, IR graduates became important in major business strategies, so, nowadays they are one of highest payrolls in companies. After graduation, the average winning for an IR graduate is about 27k for initial salary. IR graduates easily reach 50k before their 40s.
    Do you have sources for any of these claims?
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Do you have sources for any of these claims?
    Yes. Those claims do not include the UK tho. I was an intern at my homeland education department, and I was involved in a research dedicated to map the graduates destinations, because the subject is still "new". The average salary for a recent graduate was 26800, with 75% of employability (considering six months after graduation). 14% of them went to further study and 6% were unemployed.

    I don't know the UK stats for this, but I have friends who attended LSE, Oxford and KCL for their masters in IR, and they are all doing quite well.
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    Yes. Those claims do not include the UK tho. I was an intern at my homeland education department, and I was involved in a research dedicated to map the graduates destinations, because the subject is still "new". The average salary for a recent graduate was 26800, with 75% of employability (considering six months after graduation). 14% of them went to further study and 6% were unemployed.

    I don't know the UK stats for this, but I have friends who attended LSE, Oxford and KCL for their masters in IR, and they are all doing quite well.
    Where are these links to sources, then?

    You should probably have mentioned that the information you were claiming did not include the UK, where the vast majority of IR potential applicants on here would be applying.
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    I believe economics and engineering because law and medicine graduates have to do internships which rarely gives 50k. And other degrees are just... well... the majority people study them for academic pleasure.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Where are these links to sources, then?

    You should probably have mentioned that the information you were claiming did not include the UK, where the vast majority of IR potential applicants on here would be applying.
    This research was done almost 3 years ago, I'll have to look up. And it is in Portuguese.

    And I mentioned that clearly in other posts.

    The salary figure in the local currency would be approximately 7.000 reais per month (we discuss salaries per month, not per year). Most graduates were working on companies linked to International Trade, Security and IT. Those are all the figures that I have memorized.

    My point is, if in Brazil we have these kinds of figures for a career that it is still quite restricted and unknown, I'm sure that in the UK IR graduates tend to do well.
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    There hardly seem to be any posts about film related degrees, but I'm hoping to become either an editor or a colourist which could see me potentially earning from between £40k up to around £90k!
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    This research was done almost 3 years ago, I'll have to look up. And it is in Portuguese.

    And I mentioned that clearly in other posts.

    The salary figure in the local currency would be approximately 7.000 reais per month (we discuss salaries per month, not per year). Most graduates were working on companies linked to International Trade, Security and IT. Those are all the figures that I have memorized.

    My point is, if in Brazil we have these kinds of figures for a career that it is still quite restricted and unknown, I'm sure that in the UK IR graduates tend to do well.
    So not only is this research uncited and referring to another country, but it is three years old and referring to a country on another continent in a totally different environment where everything is on the up. It is precisely because it is restricted and unknown there that they will (or will have been three years ago at least) be paid so well and it is surely far-fetched to apply any aspect of this research to IR careers in present-day UK.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    So not only is this research uncited and referring to another country, but it is three years old and referring to a country on another continent in a totally different environment where everything is on the up. It is precisely because it is restricted and unknown there that they will (or will have been three years ago at least) be paid so well and it is surely far-fetched to apply any aspect of this research to IR careers in present-day UK.
    You seem angry. Did my comment almost deceived you into going to an IR degree? If so, I'm sorry. Fortunately you are an observant fella.

    But now, considering the UK, is it really possible that there is so much difference? The UK is home to some of the best IR departments in the world (Oxford, LSE, UCL, KCL). Considering the characteristics of the degree, normally IR graduates tend to work abroad, so they don't end up being limited to the UK job availability. Therefore, the 27k starting salary figure still seems really too unrealistic for you?
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    (Original post by 1drowssap)
    It's definitely no walk in the park becoming an MP, but it is not impossible. Comparing CEOs to politicians, I'd still say becoming a CEO(of an FTSE 100 company) is harder. Anyway, I was referring to what it takes to do the job when I said that. I have a feeling that they work harder trying to get into office than actually when in office. I'm of the opinion that many doctors/lawyers/engineers/investment bankers work a lot harder than them.
    I have encountered a (Conservative :rolleyes: surprise surprise) MP who works as a Barrister at the same time! Unless you're in the cabinet it's basically a part-time job


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