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    (Original post by SMed)
    Wait until year 2!! :ahee:
    Lol, that's what everyone's telling me
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    I remember that...
    Exam, assignment due date, family study visits (2 hour round trips + the meeting!), GP visits (ditto), ethics debate all within a few days of each other. I hate my life.

    ..and I still have absolutely no idea what Searle is talking about. :p: His booklets are the bane of my existence.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Exam, assignment due date, family study visits (2 hour round trips + the meeting!), GP visits (ditto), ethics debate all within a few days of each other. I hate my life.

    ..and I still have absolutely no idea what Searle is talking about. :p: His booklets are the bane of my existence.
    I remember the semester before Phase 1 exam:
    :- work for SSC module (why on EARTH did I pick 'brain disorders and cell signalling' - essay and presentation and workbook to do)
    :- Revision for Phase 1 exam (learning the last 2.5 years worth of medicine aargh)
    :- 10,000 word dissertation to be done (on two patients with same PC but different diagnoses).
    :- doing the new modules for semester 5 (Pharmacology and Neuro - not easy! Although third module was Integrative so was helpful in integrating the last 2.5 years worth of knowledge although do wish Leicester didn't love putting rare diseases in groupwork, I mean they are interesting and I do enjoy learning about them more than the common stuff but then come exams )


    And now the thought of going back to our 4th year exam + OSCE after intercalating doesn't sound so good...
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I'm all for learning the science properly, but that is just laughably ridiculous.
    why? PDH is an extremely important integrating enzyme and essential to understanding integrative metabolic biochemistry. Also PDH deficiency is supposedly the most common inborn error of metabolism causing lactic acidosis. Also also, it's an amaaazing enzyme that does funky stuff and is very clever :p:


    EDIT: all this 'dissing of metabolism makes me sad
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    why? PDH is an extremely important integrating enzyme and essential to understanding integrative metabolic biochemistry. Also PDH deficiency is supposedly the most common inborn error of metabolism causing lactic acidosis. Also also, it's an amaaazing enzyme that does funky stuff and is very clever :p:


    EDIT: all this 'dissing of metabolism makes me sad

    I have no share in your passion on PDH.
    Dont worry it will pass on entering clinical years and you will begin to wonder what exactly metabolic biochemistry is - apart from sounding like a very clever thing to say.
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    why? PDH is an extremely important integrating enzyme and essential to understanding integrative metabolic biochemistry. Also PDH deficiency is supposedly the most common inborn error of metabolism causing lactic acidosis. Also also, it's an amaaazing enzyme that does funky stuff and is very clever :p:
    I'm not saying don't learn its function and integrate that with pathology. By all means. I'm for that. What I'm saying is that pointless, superfluous detail, such as the structure of PDH, is just learning for learning's sake. And I'm not entirely against that either: I know loads of stuff that's utterly irrelevant for practising medicine, I just think that should be down to the discretion of the student to follow their interests and not for the medical school to force up on them.

    Knowing the material in insane levels of depth, in my opinion, is pointless: you forget it all anyway, unless you have a particular interest (in which case, go ahead).
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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    I have no share in your passion on PDH.
    Dont worry it will pass on entering clinical years and you will begin to wonder what exactly metabolic biochemistry is - apart from sounding like a very clever thing to say.
    I have no passion in particular :p: it is common enough (used in the loosest possible sense relative to other IEMs) and interesting enough that i remember it, biased slightly by my love of metabolism. haha i'm sure it would though! we dont really do any more metabolism after 1st year and the toll of even a few months has shown on some already :p:.


    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I'm not saying don't learn its function and integrate that with pathology. By all means. I'm for that. What I'm saying is that pointless, superfluous detail, such as the structure of PDH, is just learning for learning's sake. And I'm not entirely against that either: I know loads of stuff that's utterly irrelevant for practising medicine, I just think that should be down to the discretion of the student to follow their interests and not for the medical school to force up on them.

    Knowing the material in insane levels of depth, in my opinion, is pointless: you forget it all anyway, unless you have a particular interest (in which case, go ahead).
    oh yeah, but i imagine when most medical students say they have to 'learn the structure' what they actually mean is perhaps subunit composition at most (so in this case something like E1-3, location of PDHK and PDHP) rather than what understanding the actual structure in a biochemical sense, for example key amino acids etc. the latter of which being unnecessary in a medical sense and so justifiably avoidable. This then draws in the issue of where you kill the scientific curiosity and focus on pathophysiological necessities, for example here I'm sure you can gain some comprehension of the pathophysiology of PDH deficiency without understanding that E1 is the most common loss and what exactly that means in a molecular sense. In any case i really doubt anyone does actually have to know even subunit-type detail as a core component of their course, unless they have a particularly obtuse lecturer setting the exam...

    i completely agree with your point of view though.
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    Seems like I can't post in the graduate medic thread without being randomly negged.. Weird.
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    oh yeah, but i imagine when most medical students say they have to 'learn the structure' what they actually mean is perhaps subunit composition at most (so in this case something like E1-3, location of PDHK and PDHP) rather than what understanding the actual structure in a biochemical sense, for example key amino acids etc. the latter of which being unnecessary in a medical sense and so justifiably avoidable.
    I would probably go so far as to say that a more superficial knowledge than the subunit composition is perfectly fine. In fact, I imagine many doctors go through their entire - probably successful - working lives never having given this enzyme a moment's thought. Learnt it in semester one of year two of medical school, crammed it for an exam and then permitted it to drift out of memory.

    This then draws in the issue of where you kill the scientific curiosity and focus on pathophysiological necessities, for example here I'm sure you can gain some comprehension of the pathophysiology of PDH deficiency without understanding that E1 is the most common loss and what exactly that means in a molecular sense.
    In some cases I think enforcing unnecessary detail on everything would stunt scientific curiosity in favour of attempting to cram for exams and so on. One of the advantages of the more 'hands off' approach, for instance, at Keele, is that it gives you the opportunity to follow up on areas of interest without getting too far behind with your memorisation of petty details.

    In any case i really doubt anyone does actually have to know even subunit-type detail as a core component of their course, unless they have a particularly obtuse lecturer setting the exam...
    I hope you're right.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    I remember the semester before Phase 1 exam:
    :- work for SSC module (why on EARTH did I pick 'brain disorders and cell signalling' - essay and presentation and workbook to do)
    :- Revision for Phase 1 exam (learning the last 2.5 years worth of medicine aargh)
    :- 10,000 word dissertation to be done (on two patients with same PC but different diagnoses).
    :- doing the new modules for semester 5 (Pharmacology and Neuro - not easy! Although third module was Integrative so was helpful in integrating the last 2.5 years worth of knowledge although do wish Leicester didn't love putting rare diseases in groupwork, I mean they are interesting and I do enjoy learning about them more than the common stuff but then come exams )


    And now the thought of going back to our 4th year exam + OSCE after intercalating doesn't sound so good...
    I was hoping that they would start slow since I've only been at university what... a month? But no... it's bloody intense.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    Listening to Placebo because I'm a 12 year old goth.
    I still listen to Placebo, Jack off Jill, Marilyn Manson et al from time to time
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Seems like I can't post in the graduate medic thread without being randomly negged.. Weird.
    Nobody likes an owl, ok?
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    Exams. Dislike. Exams. Dislike. Studying. Dislike. And I choose to do this to myself.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I was hoping that they would start slow since I've only been at university what... a month? But no... it's bloody intense.
    You will soon learn that this is futile if you haven't already. In my experience, a property similar to that of entropy seems to govern term time with an iron fist.
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    Speaking of conferences/courses, I went on a 5 day course on Global Health at the Dept Public Health at Imperial College. It was really good, enjoyed the lectures, v well organised and some top lecturers there. Also was during summer. I would recommend it to anyone interested in Global Health/Public Health issues. Was a mix of ppl attending, not just med students.

    http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/publichea.../globalhealth/
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I would probably go so far as to say that a more superficial knowledge than the subunit composition is perfectly fine. In fact, I imagine many doctors go through their entire - probably successful - working lives never having given this enzyme a moment's thought. Learnt it in semester one of year two of medical school, crammed it for an exam and then permitted it to drift out of memory.
    of course! only a small subset of practicing doctors have a requirement to know such things but that is not to say it isn't of medical interest, particularly as the function of preclinical medicine is not only to prepare for the absolute clinical requirement but to also instill a sense of continuity between the scientific basis of- and clinical medicine.

    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    In some cases I think enforcing unnecessary detail on everything would stunt scientific curiosity in favour of attempting to cram for exams and so on. One of the advantages of the more 'hands off' approach, for instance, at Keele, is that it gives you the opportunity to follow up on areas of interest without getting too far behind with your memorisation of petty details.
    this is perfectly true for detail that has no functional consequence, such as the biochemical details i previously mentioned. However it isn't the case here that such detail is stunting curiosity IMO as instead it appeals to the students who are very in to the whys and hows, for example here that might be 'how does PDH become (in)activated, what is the biochemical basis? what exactly happens?' who are perhaps those more likely to be interested in academic science perhaps in combination with clinical medicine in the future. Completely agree with the intellectual freedom you describe though and that's pretty much how it works here with a compression of core material then freedom to pursue the rest (not that i would ever promote it...). If anything that is an argument against the way heavily teaching based (i.e. 9-5s) courses work?
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    This is all so exciting your all medical students! i've applied for 2012 and i've got my fingers crossed for a place how are you all finding it? loving it?
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    You will soon learn that this is futile if you haven't already. In my experience, a property similar to that of entropy seems to govern term time with an iron fist.
    I discovered this after my dentist flatmates had 3 days off from lectures to 'revise' for their exam while we had 5 hours on all the days preceding the exam, and the days after it as well. Bloody dentists...!
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    (Original post by sophiell)
    This is all so exciting your all medical students! i've applied for 2012 and i've got my fingers crossed for a place how are you all finding it? loving it?
    stressful
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    (Original post by sophiell)
    loving it?
    If there was an opposite of loving it (that wasn't necessarily hating it) then that would probably be spot on...
 
 
 
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