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    What the **** is the difference between health inequalities and health inequities? I've read so many different resources and it still sounds like bull ****.
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    this is perfectly true for detail that has no functional consequence, such as the biochemical details i previously mentioned. However it isn't the case here that such detail is stunting curiosity IMO as instead it appeals to the students who are very in to the whys and hows, for example here that might be 'how does PDH become (in)activated, what is the biochemical basis? what exactly happens?' who are perhaps those more likely to be interested in academic science perhaps in combination with clinical medicine in the future. Completely agree with the intellectual freedom you describe though and that's pretty much how it works here with a compression of core material then freedom to pursue the rest (not that i would ever promote it...). If anything that is an argument against the way heavily teaching based (i.e. 9-5s) courses work?
    Interesting. I think it possibly depends on the personality of the individual.

    I think it's an argument for it. Whether it's a knock-down argument I'm not sure.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Interesting. I think it possibly depends on the personality of the individual.

    I think it's an argument for it. Whether it's a knock-down argument I'm not sure.
    i would agree, it's definitely wasted on the majority but it becomes a question if its worth it for those few who may go on and be interested enough to get involved with such things in the future. I think two things help it happen, firstly pre-clinical lecturers are more likely to be polarised towards thinking in that kind of way rather than a strict clinical sense (regardless of qualifications) and the massive shortage of people that do want that link (i.e. the potential clinical academics) are in such shortage that medical education has to do the best to encourage the borderline students that it can!

    would also agree it probably isn't a KO, especially considering for most people the extra time off associated with freedom to pursue their interests probably involves their academic curiosity with the pub more than medical science, and justifiably so! An argument none-the-less though
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What the **** is the difference between health inequalities and health inequities? I've read so many different resources and it still sounds like bull ****.
    “Inequalities and equality are dimensional concepts, simply referring to measurable quantities. Inequity and equity, on the other hand, are political concepts, expressing a moral commitment to social justice”

    Kawachi et al (2002)

    Practically, an equal provision of care would involve giving everybody the same level of care and access to resources. An equitable service would provide a greater level of care to those who are deemed to need it most.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I was hoping that they would start slow since I've only been at university what... a month? But no... it's bloody intense.
    Yeah it gets worse, more to learn in shorter space of time. Are your exams cumulative? But the upside is, the content gets more interesting so less of a hassle to learn. Also you get used to learning and remembering that much information, for me: my first year was the easiest but I 'learnt' the most in my third year and got the most out of that year definitely.
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    (Original post by sophiell)
    This is all so exciting your all medical students! i've applied for 2012 and i've got my fingers crossed for a place how are you all finding it? loving it?
    Choose dentistry. Much less stress.
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    And probably more monies.
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    Why were you having it done?
    Unexplained anaemia, we could probably make a weird clinical case out of it. :P Thank gawd they've put it down to a virus-induced haemolytic anaemia and decided on no further testing (I've now gone from 8.5 to 11.4 Hb, so improving ) which is good as both my arms look as good as a hardcore drug user's from all those needles...
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What the **** is the difference between health inequalities and health inequities? I've read so many different resources and it still sounds like bull ****.
    One is spelt wrong.
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    (Original post by Elles)
    Ward Round Me (FY2) started off actually taking all day.
    It was care of the elderly, kept getting sucked into doing jobs as we went along & we had patients over 7 wards or so (orthogeri / surgical geri link team)...
    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    All day continuous - acute medical ward.
    It's nice to know I'm in company.

    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    You use reference software? I just do them manually :dontknow:
    :ditto:
    (Original post by SMed)
    As fiddly as refworks/write-in-cite is to set up and start using, it's DRASTICALLY easier and faster than trying to write essays/reviews manually putting in references. You basically find papers on pubmed, save the references on your refworks account. When writing a paper, click in where you want to pop in a citation, write-in-cite will automatically enter in the citation in any format you want (ie number or surname etc) and automatically generate the reference list at the end in whatever format you need (Harvard, Vancouver etc). If you've done them numbered, like Imperial and most institutions want us to do, and not by surname, it automatically orders all the citations and references. This becomes much more important if you've written quite a bit and then go back to add or remove a citation. It also becomes important if you've got 20-30 references in a paper.

    I can't even imagine how much time I'd waste trying to do it manually. This is my BSc year so I'm going to probably going to be referencing hundreds and hundreds of papers this year. (will not read hundreds and hundreds of papers though )
    I even did it manually for my dissertation which had ~ 50 references The software sounds so much easier though!

    (Original post by Beska)
    Exam, assignment due date, family study visits (2 hour round trips + the meeting!), GP visits (ditto), ethics debate all within a few days of each other. I hate my life.

    ..and I still have absolutely no idea what Searle is talking about. :p: His booklets are the bane of my existence.
    The embryology? I liked it because you get to colour in Just learn what turns into what, but tbh amount of effort put in =! reward. Have you had the sophie and the umbrella talk?Made me cringe.

    (Original post by Beska)
    I was hoping that they would start slow since I've only been at university what... a month? But no... it's bloody intense.
    The first bit is the worst :yes:
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    Any other second years feeling crushed by the workload? I think I might have an MI from the amount of stress I'm feeling at the moment. I'm generally a really stressy/worried/obssesive person anyway, so it's probably just me thinking things are worse than they are. But oh em gee I think it's just going to get even worse as the year progresses... /RANT
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    I even did it manually for my dissertation which had ~ 50 references The software sounds so much easier though!
    The software is an absolute lifesaver! just makes it so easy to change the format (if you realise it should have been in harvard or something halfway through), lets you put them in or take them out with a single click, rearranges all the numbers etc.. well worth getting if you have to do something like that again.

    also, I use "Zotero" which exists as plug-ins for Word and Firefox, which handily gives me access to all journals which I'm subscribed to through uni, without having to sign in every time... and saves all my references somewhere in the ether so I can access it all from home or uni :cool:

    (Original post by billet-doux)
    Any other second years feeling crushed by the workload? I think I might have an MI from the amount of stress I'm feeling at the moment. I'm generally a really stressy/worried/obssesive person anyway, so it's probably just me thinking things are worse than they are. But oh em gee I think it's just going to get even worse as the year progresses... /RANT
    I felt so stressed out around this time last year! Honestly though, it got a lot easier towards the end, just hang in there ... what module are you doing at the minute?
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    Does anyone know of any website which gives good detailed explanations for bacterial pathophysiology?
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    I hear Refworks is ****e, but it's the one Imperial uses so we were taught that one. Yet even still, it's drastically easier than doing it manually.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    I hear Refworks is ****e, but it's the one Imperial uses so we were taught that one. Yet even still, it's drastically easier than doing it manually.
    Its hard at first but then when you learn how to use it, its pretty easy. But if you keep changing references and the bibliography too many times, it can mess up the document, as I found out about 2 hours before I had to hand my dissertation in and then it wouldn't let me do anything with the document. The librarian had to bring a manual as she didn't know what to do either Mild panic attack.

    Just find the pubmed article (or even if you didn't use pubmed initially to get the article, just find the pubmed version and import that into refworks).
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    Totally swamped with stuff.

    I actually understand now the importance of doing stuff outside of medicine. Because, frankly, if I didn't have any other hobbies I'd bludgeon myself with Medical Sciences.

    should've taken english literature, like my flatmates, or something

    :ahee:
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    In any case i really doubt anyone does actually have to know even subunit-type detail as a core component of their course, unless they have a particularly obtuse lecturer setting the exam...
    Oh how I wish this was true. Acetylcholine receptor is the easiest of many :sigh:

    (Original post by Beska)
    If there was an opposite of loving it (that wasn't necessarily hating it) then that would probably be spot on...
    Best way of putting it I think. Exactly how I feel.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Its hard at first but then when you learn how to use it, its pretty easy. But if you keep changing references and the bibliography too many times, it can mess up the document, as I found out about 2 hours before I had to hand my dissertation in and then it wouldn't let me do anything with the document. The librarian had to bring a manual as she didn't know what to do either Mild panic attack.

    Just find the pubmed article (or even if you didn't use pubmed initially to get the article, just find the pubmed version and import that into refworks).
    Yeah, it's recommended to update the bibliography as you go, and save often. If you try to do too many at once, it throws a fit. I'll also save, close and re-open Word from time to time as it can get buggy after a while and crash inexplicably.
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    I think I procrastinate harder each year; I dunno how I manage it. I must be getting smarter to compensate.

    I have a 2500 word essay on obesity and caner due Friday at 5pm. 20+ references expected. I haven't written a single word, nor have I read a single paper. FML. F-TSR.

    I'll probably just find a review or two, rip off the references and hand in utter rubbish. :ashamed2:
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    (Original post by SabreT)
    Oh how I wish this was true. Acetylcholine receptor is the easiest of many :sigh:
    Do mean here that you're required to be aware that nicotinic ACh receptors have different subunits? Or that you need to know the subunit concoctions of them (i.e., (α4)3(β2)2)?


    If it's the latter... :rofl:
 
 
 
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