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    (Original post by tory88)
    So glad to see so many people finishing the PGCE - now I don't have to feel quite so guilty about having finished my school experience so long ago! At the same time, I'm really sorry to see that some of us have fallen at the final hurdle, and hope it all works out for you in the end.

    I finished at university on Thursday, and am having a difficult time adjusting to not being a teacher for the next few months. I've got to lean to drive and buy a car over the summer, but other than that am not really sure whether to start planning ahead for next year once I have my timetable. What is everyone else doing?
    Learning to drive is my priority! I started my NQT last friday and whilst an hour commute isn't THAT bad, it's costing me about £25 a week and it's 2 hours of travelling a day. It's a 15 minute drive!
    I'm teaching both 12s and 13s next year too so most of my summer will be spent doing subject knowledge and planning! However, I'm also buying a PS4 so I'm putting aside some time to get hooked to a new game.

    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    As in, not an actual requirement of the job but rather an additional thing that we can choose to do.
    Quite a few of my friends are being paid 'pro rata' for whatever days they work now and then their contracts are starting in september.

    My contract started today officially so I'm getting paid over the summer luckily.
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    I'll be graduating with a Masters from Durham (I could get a 2:1 with hard work this year but it would be borderline 2:2) and have experience in ~8 schools and 2-4 weeks in total.
    I don't know if you're considering Durham but they are not allowed to consider anyone with a 2:2
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    (Original post by alabelle)
    I don't know if you're considering Durham but they are not allowed to consider anyone with a 2:2
    Durham will consider you with a third, it says on the website and they came into physics lectures to tell us.
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    Durham will consider you with a third, it says on the website and they came into physics lectures to tell us.
    Ah, I stand corrected.
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    (Original post by Jonny86)
    I'm just back from a week at my new school, didn't even think to ask for pay! They paid for my flights and let me stay in the school house though for free though so I wasn't out of pocket as such. I had a question I was hoping someone could help with. I'd love to take a football team next year in my school but I'm unsure of what credentials I need. Is there a course that I'd need to have taken in order to coach my pupils? And if so would it be likely that the school would pay for it? Or as a teacher there can I just put my name forward to help without any additional qualifications?
    Is this primary? If so you should be fine in general to just run the club, the same as you can teach PE without a specific qualification. It's possible your school might already have someone specific who runs a PE club who is more trained, or have outside people come in. If there is another teacher though it's a good opportunity to help them with it. It's always good to do your NQT club with someone else, then you get to learn the rules of clubs in your school etc.


    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    Durham will consider you with a third, it says on the website and they came into physics lectures to tell us.
    Wow really? When I did my PGCE government rules said you have to have 2:2 or better! And my provider would only consider below 2:2 if you had lots of good experience in the sector. I guess they're different or have changed for physics since there's a shortage?

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Is this primary? If so you should be fine in general to just run the club, the same as you can teach PE without a specific qualification. It's possible your school might already have someone specific who runs a PE club who is more trained, or have outside people come in. If there is another teacher though it's a good opportunity to help them with it. It's always good to do your NQT club with someone else, then you get to learn the rules of clubs in your school etc.
    Wow really? When I did my PGCE government rules said you have to have 2:2 or better! And my provider would only consider below 2:2 if you had lots of good experience in the sector. I guess they're different or have changed for physics since there's a shortage?
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    'Have an honours degree for Physics, a 2:2 or above for Chemistry, or a 2:1 or above for Biology. Science or a similar subject is at least 50% of the overall degree.'

    https://www.dur.ac.uk/education/post...ndary/science/
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    'Have an honours degree for Physics, a 2:2 or above for Chemistry, or a 2:1 or above for Biology. Science or a similar subject is at least 50% of the overall degree.'

    https://www.dur.ac.uk/education/post...ndary/science/
    I believe you It was more of a rhetorical 'Wow, really?' since I am surprised they allow it! Especially since they keep going on about 'rigour', whatever that actually means.

    xxx
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    I believe you It was more of a rhetorical 'Wow, really?' since I am surprised they allow it! Especially since they keep going on about 'rigour', whatever that actually means.

    xxx
    'Have an honours degree for Physics, a 2:2 or above for Chemistry, or a 2:1 or above for Biology. Science or a similar subject is at least 50% of the overall degree.'

    It's all marketing nonsense. They should come forth with honesty and say "a Third" or above for Physics. But I guess that destroys their "rigour uni" view. -_-
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    Congratulations and commiserations in equal measure! As someone who's a year further down the line than you, I offer a few words (feel free to ignore them though!)

    It doesn't take long to adapt - the worst part is 'losing your identity' when someone asks you what you do. 'I'm a teac... No, hang on a minute, I'm not'

    The best part is waking up in the morning and thinking 'what shall I do today?' Freedom! Although I spent the first six months feeling guilty or thinking I should be doing something.

    Holidays during term time are quite something - we went to a museum last week and had the Whole Place to ourselves! Weird.

    Keeping up with what's going on in school is really difficult - even if you visit, it's like you are speaking a different language.

    I now do lots of governor stuff (ex teachers are very much in demand) so start to practice saying 'no' if you don't want to get involved in that. Or invigilating. Or cover.

    Seriously though, retirement is great and I'm glad I did it early.





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    I am curious. What do governors do? Are they just volunteers? I read an article in the Guardian about it. Apparently, it is mostly for old folk? I think it would be cool if it was open to young people too.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    So glad to see so many people finishing the PGCE - now I don't have to feel quite so guilty about having finished my school experience so long ago! At the same time, I'm really sorry to see that some of us have fallen at the final hurdle, and hope it all works out for you in the end.

    I finished at university on Thursday, and am having a difficult time adjusting to not being a teacher for the next few months. I've got to lean to drive and buy a car over the summer, but other than that am not really sure whether to start planning ahead for next year once I have my timetable. What is everyone else doing?



    I didn't expect to be paid for my induction, but then it was only for a day. It depends how the school view the day, I would guess - for me it was very much seen as something to help the new teachers, and so wasn't seen as something that should have been paid. Perhaps ask your university tutor what they think?



    Physics PGCEs are never going to be properly competitive, even if they are at Oxbridge (or the IoE who - as they will tell you in every email they send - are first in the world for teacher training...). If you are well-qualified and motivated, I shouldn't think there would be too much competition out there for any physics PGCE (Physics with Maths can be a little more competitive, but not much).



    I've always just said "yes". It's really obvious you are because there's always someone at the back taking notes on you, you're unlikely to have a SIMS login to do the register, and you've arrived at a weird time of the year. Answering simply means it doesn't become an issue, and provided you're consistent in your expectations of behavior (easier said than done) you shouldn't have any problems. I taught in both a really nice and a really rough school this year, and never regretted being open about it.
    They are the first in the world for education overall and that does not include being first in teaching. Else, countries with the most numbers of IoE teachers would be higher in the PISA rankings.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    I do Physics with Maths. You will not avoid teaching biology or chemistry on your PGCE year - you will be attached to a science department for most of your timetable and they will use you to teach any of the sciences.
    In terms of employability, to be honest everyone who wants a job and is any good with either Physics or Physics with Maths will get one. Schools are generally reluctant to let you work cross-departments, but if you're a good candidate you can usually argue it (I think 50% of my course have managed to get some maths into their timetable). Myself, I had two job offers, both of which gave me some maths involvement.
    Any idea why?
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    I am curious. What do governors do? Are they just volunteers? I read an article in the Guardian about it. Apparently, it is mostly for old folk? I think it would be cool if it was open to young people too.
    Governors are volunteers, but actually it's a really accountable role now - you're expected to hold the head teacher to account for pretty much everything (finances, staffing, results etc), which means you have to know lots about what is going on in the school. It's all to do with strategic leadership rather than day-to-day management. More information here: https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...s_Handbook.pdf - when I show this to prospective governors, and explain that they'll probably have to give up a couple of days a term to visit school, then meetings approximately monthly and lots of reading and training, it puts people off!

    It's all good until Ofsted come along, because governors are part of the Senior Leadership judgement - then it becomes frankly scary because you don't want to let the school down. At our last Ofsted, the inspector held up the Raiseonline data, pointed to a random figure and said 'explain this figure' (if you haven't come across the joys of Raiseonline yet, it's annual performance data results, ours was 59 pages long with up to 260 figures per page). That's deep knowledge.

    There is a perception that it's mainly for old folk - which is because people who work find it difficult to fulfil the role properly! I would absolutely love to have youngsters on 'my' governing body, the wider the range of governors the better it is for the school.

    (I suspect I haven't answered your question - basically we read paperwork, go to loads of meetings, sometimes get invited to school during the day or to productions which is the best bit, don't get paid, rarely get thanked and get a hard time in the press!)
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)

    .........(I suspect I haven't answered your question - basically we read paperwork, go to loads of meetings, sometimes get invited to school during the day or to productions which is the best bit, don't get paid, rarely get thanked and get a hard time in the press!)
    So, apart from the pay bit, still quite like teaching?!
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    (Original post by neilcn)
    So, apart from the pay bit, still quite like teaching?!
    haha, knew someone would pick that up! Yup, got it in one
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    (Original post by neilcn)
    So, apart from the pay bit, still quite like teaching?!
    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    haha, knew someone would pick that up! Yup, got it in one
    One of several reasons why I'm not considering it! I take my hat off to any who do. It's an unbelievably hard and largely thankless task.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    One of several reasons why I'm not considering it! I take my hat off to any who do. It's an unbelievably hard and largely thankless task.
    and endlessly fascinating, hence the subject of my doctoral thesis! I will never be short of things to write about under the current regime. The question of 'why doesn't everyone quit?' remains unanswered.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Any idea why?
    I think it's mostly just that it's a lot of faff. Particularly for science mixing with something - do you get your own laboratory, because then everything else taught in there is wasting valuable lab space, which departmental meetings should you go to, if parents evening clash which subject takes priority. Plus the usual "my subject is better than yours" etc., which is prompted if you have a scientist coming over to teach maths or visa versa. I had two placements this year, the first one was really helpful and have employed me in both departments; the second refused to even entertain the idea that I could teach maths...

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    I am curious. What do governors do? Are they just volunteers? I read an article in the Guardian about it. Apparently, it is mostly for old folk? I think it would be cool if it was open to young people too.
    I know a 26 year old governor... I get the impression he's not the norm, though.
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    My ideal job has come up. A job I've been checking the website for for ages and just hoping would come up. And it has! I need to perfect this application.

    Question - if you're applying to an old place of study, can/should you mention that in your letter of application? The honest truth is that I have wanted to work at this college ever since I attended because I had an amazing time as a student there and always wanted to return as a member of staff. I sort of want to mention my positive experience of the college and how it has led to me wanting to work there but don't want to make it sound cheesy or desperate.

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    It could be the introduction to the personal statement part, but don't gush too much...more state the fact...


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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    My ideal job has come up. A job I've been checking the website for for ages and just hoping would come up. And it has! I need to perfect this application.

    Question - if you're applying to an old place of study, can/should you mention that in your letter of application? The honest truth is that I have wanted to work at this college ever since I attended because I had an amazing time as a student there and always wanted to return as a member of staff. I sort of want to mention my positive experience of the college and how it has led to me wanting to work there but don't want to make it sound cheesy or desperate.

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    I think it would be OK to mention it as part of the why you want to work there bit (I.e. you like the college etc which you got to know well as a student). Just make sure it doesn't sound like you're using going there as a plus point on your side. And don't sacrifice a good selling point for the sake of including it. I applied for a job at an old school and didn't mention it, but did when I went for interview as they were doing a tour and asked have you been before.

    Xxx

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