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    (Original post by Tombola)
    What are the seating arrangements like in secondary schools today?

    I'm thinking back to my own secondary school experience which was around 9 years ago or so. It was mostly in the form of rows. Has that changed now?
    Mostly yes. Tables tend to be in squares now, to facilitate group work for independent learning.

    At first I really missed rows as I thought group tables were distracting for the pupils and I didn't like the layout of the classroom. However towards the end we had to move them back to rows for a couple of lessons and I hated how rigid it felt. I've clearly gotten too used to groups now!

    That is just my experience anyway. Others may still be in rows.

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    Oh and I think it massively depends on the subject. At my ladt school maths and English were still in rows, come to think of it

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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Mostly yes. Tables tend to be in squares now, to facilitate group work for independent learning.

    At first I really missed rows as I thought group tables were distracting for the pupils and I didn't like the layout of the classroom. However towards the end we had to move them back to rows for a couple of lessons and I hated how rigid it felt. I've clearly gotten too used to groups now!

    That is just my experience anyway. Others may still be in rows.

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    Yeah, it's mainly the behaviour management side that I'm more concerned with. During my placement the children were always chatting away. It probably didn't help that I used talk partners in every lesson.

    Was behaviour better at least?
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    Yeah, it's mainly the behaviour management side that I'm more concerned with. During my placement the children were always chatting away. It probably didn't help that I used talk partners in every lesson.

    Was behaviour better at least?
    Behaviour better in groups? I think it's worse for the same reason you said about how I always used talk partners so I think they just thought it was okay to talk all the time.

    In rows they are constantly turning round and things so it's just as frustrating really. And more difficult when you want them to work in anymore than a pair.

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    (Original post by Tombola)
    What are the seating arrangements like in secondary schools today?

    I'm thinking back to my own secondary school experience which was around 9 years ago or so. It was mostly in the form of rows. Has that changed now?
    I'm in my 2nd year of teaching and have my classroom set up in rows as do most teachers in my department. One has rows facing slightly different directions (horseshoe-ish, but not quite).

    Personally I'm not a fan of group work and use it very rarely, so I don't see the point in tables of 4.

    Pupils work in pairs quite frequently in my lessons and they can do that easily in the rows set-up I have. On the rare ocassions I do want them to work in a 4, all that needs to happen is for the front pair to turn their chairs around to work with the pair behind them.

    I think it depends a bit on your subject too.

    I teach languages which requires a lot more teacher-talk than other subjects because we provide the main source of language input for our pupils. We tend to do a lot more short, fast-paced activities because pupils can't handle a 30-minute task in a foreign language, they need shorter scaffolded tasks and bringing back together to check understanding.

    In History, there's likely to be quite a bit of discussion, analysing sources etc., which could be usefully done in groups, so grouped tables may be worthwhile.

    In Maths, I can't see that there would be many occasions when you'd want pupils to work in groups. It seems that it would lend itself more to rows and pairs than to grouped tables.

    In creative subjects like Art, there's less teacher input and more of pupils working individually or in groups, so they don't really need to be facing towards the front all the time (plus there's more room to spread work out on larger grouped tables).

    Ultimately, who do you think your pupils will learn more from in your subject - you, or their peers? I am a firm believer that I am the expert on the subject in my classroom, so why would I want pupils facing away from me and chatting to someone else on a regular basis?
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    Individual desks give you much more flexibility. Alphabetical order in rows until they've earned the right to sit with their friends/in groups was always my tactic. You can rearrange the furniture to suit yourself.
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    Hope everyone is enjoying NQT induction!


    Was just wondering whether anyone knew anything about when TA jobs usually come out. I've been applying to local TA jobs but there aren't many of them and I haven't even had an interview yet. Will there be more coming out closer to July or is this likely to be it?
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm in my 2nd year of teaching and have my classroom set up in rows as do most teachers in my department. One has rows facing slightly different directions (horseshoe-ish, but not quite).

    Personally I'm not a fan of group work and use it very rarely, so I don't see the point in tables of 4.

    Pupils work in pairs quite frequently in my lessons and they can do that easily in the rows set-up I have. On the rare ocassions I do want them to work in a 4, all that needs to happen is for the front pair to turn their chairs around to work with the pair behind them.

    I think it depends a bit on your subject too.

    I teach languages which requires a lot more teacher-talk than other subjects because we provide the main source of language input for our pupils. We tend to do a lot more short, fast-paced activities because pupils can't handle a 30-minute task in a foreign language, they need shorter scaffolded tasks and bringing back together to check understanding.

    In History, there's likely to be quite a bit of discussion, analysing sources etc., which could be usefully done in groups, so grouped tables may be worthwhile.

    In Maths, I can't see that there would be many occasions when you'd want pupils to work in groups. It seems that it would lend itself more to rows and pairs than to grouped tables.

    In creative subjects like Art, there's less teacher input and more of pupils working individually or in groups, so they don't really need to be facing towards the front all the time (plus there's more room to spread work out on larger grouped tables).

    Ultimately, who do you think your pupils will learn more from in your subject - you, or their peers? I am a firm believer that I am the expert on the subject in my classroom, so why would I want pupils facing away from me and chatting to someone else on a regular basis?
    Yeah, that is the impression I get as well. It certainly does feel like some students may benefit from working independently as opposed to constantly being distracted by someone else.

    I got the whole collaborative discussions being useful to the students but during my placement I can't say I used group discussions that often when I think back on everything. I was much more likely to do paired talk partners?

    I think it's almost expected at primary school level that children are seated in groups. I've only seen the rows thing in Y6 as well as horse shoe.
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    (Original post by alabelle)
    Hope everyone is enjoying NQT induction!


    Was just wondering whether anyone knew anything about when TA jobs usually come out. I've been applying to local TA jobs but there aren't many of them and I haven't even had an interview yet. Will there be more coming out closer to July or is this likely to be it?
    Sorry to hear you've not been getting anywhere. I regularly look at support vacancies and in my area there is LOADS of TA jobs at the moment! And there normally always is. As for the time of year I would imagine there is still some more to come but there will be an understandable drought in August (although I wouldn't rule out some jobs coming up). Support jobs, in my experience, do have a year round turn over, as opposed to teaching going through peaks.

    I believe they do a supply system for TAs. I imagine it would be harder to get any days than teaching, but my mum is a TA and she's done that in the past, as have some of her colleagues.
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    Yeah, that is the impression I get as well. It certainly does feel like some students may benefit from working independently as opposed to constantly being distracted by someone else.

    I got the whole collaborative discussions being useful to the students but during my placement I can't say I used group discussions that often when I think back on everything. I was much more likely to do paired talk partners?

    I think it's almost expected at primary school level that children are seated in groups. I've only seen the rows thing in Y6 as well as horse shoe.
    I've seen rows in year one. It was horrific.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    I've seen rows in year one. It was horrific.

    Xxx

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    That sounds oddly interesting...
    What was it like?

    Then again it sounds really impractical if you are doing carousels and focus groups which I imagine to be part of reception/Y1.
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    That sounds oddly interesting...
    What was it like?

    Then again it sounds really impractical if you are doing carousels and focus groups which I imagine to be part of reception/Y1.
    Well I am an early years (nursery and reception) person. So the children wouldn't even have desks in my room as that's not how eyfs is meant to work. Personally I'm of the opinion this should carry on til at least 7 years but you don't get that in many year one and two classrooms. Even then though there is plenty of moving around, talking, play etc.

    It was just bizarre. It was really, really quiet. Too quiet for the age of the children. And they were all facing the teacher... Which again is just bizarre if its for more than a few minutes on a carpet. I want five year olds to be using their natural inquisitiveness and developing good learning, social, physical and language skills. Sharing stories in a book corner that feels comfortable. Writing across all the areas of the room, not just at a desk. Playing outside. Not sitting and listening to me drawl on.

    Xxx

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    I got the job. I'm quite pleased as it sounds much better than I expected and the college looks very nice, plus the staff were lovely. The pay is also much better than I expected. My aim when I started the PGCE was always to teach A-Level Politics and that is what I'll be doing, so I guess you could say I've achieved my goal.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I got the job. I'm quite pleased as it sounds much better than I expected and the college looks very nice, plus the staff were lovely. The pay is also much better than I expected. My aim when I started the PGCE was always to teach A-Level Politics and that is what I'll be doing, so I guess you could say I've achieved my goal.
    Hooray! That's wonderful news! I'm so happy for you!
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I got the job. I'm quite pleased as it sounds much better than I expected and the college looks very nice, plus the staff were lovely. The pay is also much better than I expected. My aim when I started the PGCE was always to teach A-Level Politics and that is what I'll be doing, so I guess you could say I've achieved my goal.
    Well done, congrats ☺️



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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Hooray! That's wonderful news! I'm so happy for you!
    (Original post by Jellybean26!)
    Well done, congrats ☺️



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    Thanks! There's so few jobs in A-Level Politics (that aren't combined with History or something) so I feel very lucky to have gotten it.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Thanks! There's so few jobs in A-Level Politics (that aren't combined with History or something) so I feel very lucky to have gotten it.
    Indeed so. Enjoy!
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I got the job. I'm quite pleased as it sounds much better than I expected and the college looks very nice, plus the staff were lovely. The pay is also much better than I expected. My aim when I started the PGCE was always to teach A-Level Politics and that is what I'll be doing, so I guess you could say I've achieved my goal.
    Congratulations!
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    Well done Airfairy.


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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I got the job. I'm quite pleased as it sounds much better than I expected and the college looks very nice, plus the staff were lovely. The pay is also much better than I expected. My aim when I started the PGCE was always to teach A-Level Politics and that is what I'll be doing, so I guess you could say I've achieved my goal.
    Congratulations

    I really hope you have a super positive experience, and am so happy that you've gotten more in to teaching. NQT year is tough but also fun and a great learning experience.

    Xxx

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