Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Gotta do some **** about inter-professional learning. Some online forum with nursing/physio/social work etc students and online e-tivities about a fictional street :facepalm2:

    We've also had two lectures about how to search a journal database. Keeping in mind that we're all graduates. I wont even mention the afternoon that we spent having a group discussion to define what it meant to be 'ethnic'.

    As much as I love my medical school, they have weird priorities sometimes.
    I once had a "Diversity" afternoon, which began with us having to explain our surnames and their/our origins.

    My surname was fairly self explanatory, I felt (very common British surname, relating to the fact that probably at some point in the past my ancestors caught fish for a living). This didn't stop the facilitator probing about where I thought it came from (well, duh), whether anyone in my family still fished (no) and whether I felt it "represented" me (erm...?)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    I once had a "Diversity" afternoon, which began with us having to explain our surnames and their/our origins.

    My surname was fairly self explanatory, I felt (very common British surname, relating to the fact that probably at some point in the past my ancestors caught fish for a living). This didn't stop the facilitator probing about where I thought it came from (well, duh), whether anyone in my family still fished (no) and whether I felt it "represented" me (erm...?)
    lol I'd probably just make something up like saying I chose my surname. If he asks why I chose that particular name, I'd just come up with either some really just practical reason (fewer letters) or some arbitrary reason (has the correct number of vowels for a surname).
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SMed)
    lol I'd probably just make something up like saying I chose my surname. If he asks why I chose that particular name, I'd just come up with either some really just practical reason (fewer letters) or some arbitrary reason (has the correct number of vowels for a surname).
    Given the **** I got at school for my surname, I have no idea why anyone would pick it voluntarily.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I quite like my surname, it doesn't sound particularly unusual, IMO, but I've never met anyone else (who I'm not related to) that shares it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Worked in Sir Alec Jeffries lab today. :cool:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gozatron)
    Or the ones who are **** and get the sarcastic applause.

    Urgh, i hate it! Would you have clapped your teachers after a lesson at sixth form?
    Sometimes at the end of clapping, some people still clap but slowly which then builds up a full blow clapping session again. I have an odd year group.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    I quite like my surname, it doesn't sound particularly unusual, IMO, but I've never met anyone else (who I'm not related to) that shares it.
    Ditto :holmes:
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Ditto :holmes:
    I'd laugh if we had the same name.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone managed to log onto NHS.net using a mac? How'd you manage it?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by billet-doux)
    Agreed! They are such a mission How is 3rd year going?!
    It's pretty ace all in all tbh. Being in Chichester for my first rotation is definitely a good thing, very social atmosphere and everyone's so willing to give us their time and to teach us. Enjoying gastro far more than I thought I would too.

    Must say it's a lot of work, probably more to do than in second year but it's a much better kind of busy actually seeing patients and doing practical things. Way, way better than pre-clinical stuff! Second year was such a chore (not very reassuring I know!).
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    It's pretty ace all in all tbh. Being in Chichester for my first rotation is definitely a good thing, very social atmosphere and everyone's so willing to give us their time and to teach us. Enjoying gastro far more than I thought I would too.

    Must say it's a lot of work, probably more to do than in second year but it's a much better kind of busy actually seeing patients and doing practical things. Way, way better than pre-clinical stuff! Second year was such a chore (not very reassuring I know!).
    Chinchester? Christ, isn't that a treck?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    So, I'm writing up a PBL for blood transfusions which I always thought I understood.

    However, I was just writing out about O- being the universal doner but I kind of don't understand it anymore. I understand it has no antigens on the surface of the RBCs to be caught by the recipients antibodies but surely it has A and B antibodies in it? So wouldn't that cause a reaction between the recipients A/B/AB antigens and the donors antibodies? I know rhesus it won't because *most* people don't have rhesus antibodies unless they've been previously exposed to it.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    Given the **** I got at school for my surname, I have no idea why anyone would pick it voluntarily.
    I would happily trade :sigh:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Passed my first finals long case
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RollerBall)
    So, I'm writing up a PBL for blood transfusions which I always thought I understood.

    However, I was just writing out about O- being the universal doner but I kind of don't understand it anymore. I understand it has no antigens on the surface of the RBCs to be caught by the recipients antibodies but surely it has A and B antibodies in it? So wouldn't that cause a reaction between the recipients A/B/AB antigens and the donors antibodies? I know rhesus it won't because *most* people don't have rhesus antibodies unless they've been previously exposed to it.
    As far as I was told, the reason it's universal is because it's universal for a red cell transfusion. I.e. they transfer the red cells, not the serum/other cells in the donor blood. Therefore the antibodies won't be transfused. There are different types of transfusion which transfer different aspects of the blood and I believe you can make a full blood transfusion, so serum, red cells etc. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what I was made to believe.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    As far as I was told, the reason it's universal is because it's universal for a red cell transfusion. I.e. they transfer the red cells, not the serum/other cells in the donor blood. Therefore the antibodies won't be transfused. There are different types of transfusion which transfer different aspects of the blood and I believe you can make a full blood transfusion, so serum, red cells etc. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what I was made to believe.
    Yeah, I think you're right. I had a look around after I posted and there are seperate plasma (contains antibodies but not antigens), platlets (contain neither but should try to match for remnent red blood cells) and RBC transfusions (follow the standard rules).

    From what I have gathered they no longer do full blood transfusions which is why it is not neccessary to match antibodies as well as antigens.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    As far as I was told, the reason it's universal is because it's universal for a red cell transfusion. I.e. they transfer the red cells, not the serum/other cells in the donor blood. Therefore the antibodies won't be transfused. There are different types of transfusion which transfer different aspects of the blood and I believe you can make a full blood transfusion, so serum, red cells etc. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what I was made to believe.
    Sounds legit.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RollerBall)
    So, I'm writing up a PBL for blood transfusions which I always thought I understood.

    However, I was just writing out about O- being the universal doner but I kind of don't understand it anymore. I understand it has no antigens on the surface of the RBCs to be caught by the recipients antibodies but surely it has A and B antibodies in it? So wouldn't that cause a reaction between the recipients A/B/AB antigens and the donors antibodies? I know rhesus it won't because *most* people don't have rhesus antibodies unless they've been previously exposed to it.
    As above, but also you want to think about volumes. There will be a tiny amount of a/b graft antibodies against lots of a/b/ab host cells whereas it's much more problematic if there are lots of host antibodies against the graft cells. However, there is graft vs. host disease
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Two PBLs done. Can't be bothered with thalassemia. I shall crack on tomorrow and try to get that one done and the four Metabolism PBLs I'm behind on. Then rock on the lecture write ups.

    This work melarky is far too much work.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lantana)
    As above, but also you want to think about volumes. There will be a tiny amount of a/b graft antibodies against lots of a/b/ab host cells whereas it's much more problematic if there are lots of host antibodies against the graft cells. However, there is graft vs. host disease
    Isn't GvH something completely different? As in it's from marrow transplants and the creation of antibodies against the hosts cells from the graft marrow?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.