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    The unemployment rate for CS is scarily high though, yet there are these articles in the Guardian or whatever saying "WE NEED MORE CS GRADS"
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    Hack the NSA instead.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    Well I am a final year music student at a very prestigious place and I am predicted a first.

    I do have an internship sorted for next summer and after I am doing an Msc CS (Conversion)
    Meantime I've become fairly competent in C, C++,C#, Java and MySQL. I plan on learning web languages afterwards. I am trying to find open source projects to contribute online, but untill I reach that standard I am just practising my algorithm/problem-solving skills on Hackerrank.
    Hows it feel knowing you wasted £45k+ at university studying something unrelated?
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    I graduated with a 2.2 in Health and Social Care in July 2014. It took me about 5 months to get a job working in a call centre for an energy company but it was temporary for 8 months. Before that I volunteered at a local charity doing admin job, worked at uni and in retail. To me it wasn't much but it really helped me in the long term.
    I applied for different jobs in admin work and had quite a few replies which turned into interviews.Times passed by and I was eventually given 2 job offers - one of them was for waitress at a restaurant and the other was at a furniture store doing actual admin work which is more than the national minimum wage.

    Ok enough of me bragging.

    Here's the moral of the story:

    Yes it is hard to get a job nowadays but you're just simply making it harder by not pushing yourself. The only traditional way of thinking about this is to start work from the bottom to get to the top of the career ladder, otherwise...well you'll soon learn why and it will bite you hard.

    If I wasn't offered that admin job I would've still accepted the waitress position because it's a tough world out there and you've got to take what is given to you until you find something better, you can't just say 'don't want this job' simply because you don't like it, you're still young you have a lot to learn in your (possible working) life.
    Not to critique you at all but this is pretty tragic - that someone with a BA(Hons) is doing an admin job. Years ago those sorts of jobs would have gone to 16 year old school leavers with 3 CSE's.

    I guess that's what happens when half the country goes to Uni. Degrees become practically worthless. I think that's the real moral of the story.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    This thread makes me sad.
    Dude I'm in a top london office in a top company earning a starting salary of 28k, I got a 2:2.

    Nothing to be sad about, some people are losers (like OP)

    harsh I know, but damn, to settle for working in a checkout after 3 years as a comp sci student, that's ****ing pathetic, I know there are jobs out there because I had the exact same qualifications as OP and had jobs coming out my ass (3 offers, 1 25k offer and two 28k offers)

    in fact for every interview I attended I got an offer, I was in a position of choice! haha imagine that. and I had a 2:2 in computer science!!! like the OP.

    It's about you, not the grade, employers couldn't give a **** if you have what they're looking for, you need a degree, good grades help, but when literally 1000's and 1000's of people have 2:1's, there's nothing special about them anymore, employers want more, give them more and you'll succeed,

    it's simple.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    The unemployment rate for CS is scarily high though, yet there are these articles in the Guardian or whatever saying "WE NEED MORE CS GRADS"
    Because: 'IT' is lumped in with CS, a lot of poor quality universities offer the aforementioned course, a lot of people generally suck at programming but refuse to look into other general jobs, laziness.

    A CS grad (from a decent uni) with good programming skills can command a very healthy salary. Those at the very top end of the uni scale can sidestep into finance/IB if they so wish.

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    (Original post by Howard)
    Not to critique you at all but this is pretty tragic - that someone with a BA(Hons) is doing an admin job. Years ago those sorts of jobs would have gone to 16 year old school leavers with 3 CSE's.

    I guess that's what happens when half the country goes to Uni. Degrees become practically worthless. I think that's the real moral of the story.
    It was either that or being unemployed for the rest of my life and I'm contributing to society by paying my taxes.
    Also a lot of employers are looking for customer service along with office experience which obviously fewer graduates have.
    My manager also thinks I'm worth 24k if you don't have a job that earns you this much then please don't critique me, after all getting a degree is about getting more money isn't it for most people?
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Dude I'm in a top london office in a top company earning a starting salary of 28k, I got a 2:2.

    Nothing to be sad about, some people are losers (like OP)

    harsh I know, but damn, to settle for working in a checkout after 3 years as a comp sci student, that's ****ing pathetic, I know there are jobs out there because I had the exact same qualifications as OP and had jobs coming out my ass (3 offers, 1 25k offer and two 28k offers)

    in fact for every interview I attended I got an offer, I was in a position of choice! haha imagine that. and I had a 2:2 in computer science!!! like the OP.

    It's about you, not the grade, employers couldn't give a **** if you have what they're looking for, you need a degree, good grades help, but when literally 1000's and 1000's of people have 2:1's, there's nothing special about them anymore, employers want more, give them more and you'll succeed,

    it's simple.
    When you were looking for jobs how much did you find a 2:2 limiting, would a 2:2 with masters all from a top uni help?
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    The unemployment rate for CS is scarily high though, yet there are these articles in the Guardian or whatever saying "WE NEED MORE CS GRADS"
    You are absolutely correct, though let me explain to you why some CS grads cannot get jobs.

    The industry needs more innovative, creative CS grads.
    Anyone can code if they put in enough work. It's what they can code that differentiates those people who can get jobs with those who can't

    I've expressed this before in this thread but I'll repeat it.
    (This bit isn't aimed at you or your comment , but for the thread in general)

    Much like Architecture, to get a really good job you need to prove to the employer what you're capable of. This can be done in many different ways, preferably whilst at university.

    You must build a portfolio showing your successes, and even things that haven't really worked. It's the idea that's most important.

    1) Projects: You must ensure that you take part in tons of projects, both group projects and private projects. This is very important because it shows the employer you're good with working in teams to produce a solution an error, or do something that's never been done before. Also it shows what you're capable of in terms of creativity, innovation and of course coding.

    2) Hackathons: This may seem stupid but these events are important for your CV. In Hackathons you have 24 hours (time-frame varies from event to event, host decides, but its usually 24 hours) to create something (topic is decided again by the host and announced on the day) from scratch that could be used in an industry environment. This is key because it shows the employer that you can cope with pressure and that you're both a creative and innovative person, whilst being an excellent problem solver.

    3) Internships: I cannot express how important this is, another key thing employers look for is experience. I would HIGHLY recommend you sort out an internship for your penultimate year. Not only will this ensure you can some industrial experience. But, if you're clever enough, it could be an excellent opportunity to network.
    Also, you may possibly end up with a job offer at the end of the internship. Depends how good you are :P


    All in all, don't expect an amazing job if you have little or no experience outside of university studies
    YOUR DEGREE CLASSIFICATION DOESN'T MATTER AS MUCH AS YOU THINK IT DOES (though obviously try to get minimum 2.1, nothing worse than 2.2 pls xD)

    rant over :woo::woo:
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    Hows it feel knowing you wasted £45k+ at university studying something unrelated?
    Wasted? I don't think so.

    I know far more about my subject than most do, I can easily teach privately part-time which will allow me to earn a small living allowance.


    I've learnt a lot about myself during these years.
    I've become a far better student in these years.
    There are plenty of transferable skills from having studied Music and my instrument for 17 years which can be bought across several areas.
    I've met some fantastic people throughout these years, and I've had the opportunity to work with some truly amazing teachers.

    Working professionally in music would always keep me unsatisfied, even though I love playing.
    So are you arguing that I should remain unhappy for the rest of my life just because of some silly choice I made when I was 17?
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Dude I'm in a top london office in a top company earning a starting salary of 28k, I got a 2:2.

    Nothing to be sad about, some people are losers (like OP)

    harsh I know, but damn, to settle for working in a checkout after 3 years as a comp sci student, that's ****ing pathetic, I know there are jobs out there because I had the exact same qualifications as OP and had jobs coming out my ass (3 offers, 1 25k offer and two 28k offers)

    in fact for every interview I attended I got an offer, I was in a position of choice! haha imagine that. and I had a 2:2 in computer science!!! like the OP.

    It's about you, not the grade, employers couldn't give a **** if you have what they're looking for, you need a degree, good grades help, but when literally 1000's and 1000's of people have 2:1's, there's nothing special about them anymore, employers want more, give them more and you'll succeed,

    it's simple.
    Ok we get it you've got a half decent job. You've made a thread already bragging about it and now you're being a complete arse about it to other people. It's about time you got off your high horse. 28k in London isn't even that impressive.
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    (Original post by edothero)
    You are absolutely correct, though let me explain to you why some CS grads cannot get jobs.

    The industry needs more innovative, creative CS grads.
    Anyone can code if they put in enough work. It's what they can code that differentiates those people who can get jobs with those who can't

    I've expressed this before in this thread but I'll repeat it.
    (This bit isn't aimed at you or your comment , but for the thread in general)

    Much like Architecture, to get a really good job you need to prove to the employer what you're capable of. This can be done in many different ways, preferably whilst at university.

    You must build a portfolio showing your successes, and even things that haven't really worked. It's the idea that's most important.

    1) Projects: You must ensure that you take part in tons of projects, both group projects and private projects. This is very important because it shows the employer you're good with working in teams to produce a solution an error, or do something that's never been done before. Also it shows what you're capable of in terms of creativity, innovation and of course coding.

    2) Hackathons: This may seem stupid but these events are important for your CV. In Hackathons you have 24 hours (time-frame varies from event to event, host decides, but its usually 24 hours) to create something (topic is decided again by the host) from scratch that could be used in an industry environment. This is key because it shows the employer that you can cope with pressure and that you're both a creative and innovative person, whilst being an excellent problem solver.

    3) Internships: I cannot express how important this is, another key thing employers look for is experience. I would HIGHLY recommend you sort out an internship for your penultimate year. Not only will this ensure you can some industrial experience. But, if you're clever enough, it could be an excellent opportunity to network.
    Also, you may possibly end up with a job offer at the end of the internship. Depends how good you are :P


    All in all, don't expect an amazing job if you have little or no experience outside of university studies
    YOUR DEGREE CLASSIFICATION DOESN'T MATTER AS MUCH AS YOU THINK IT DOES (though obviously try to get minimum 2.1, nothing worse than 2.2 pls xD)

    rant over :woo::woo:
    Amen.
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    (Original post by Silly_Monkey)
    Actually my cousin works in a top 50 law firm and moans about his salary and the amount of work they do and has said they need more staff. Staff numbers have substantially reduced.

    Truth be told, many companies should be employing more people.
    Law sucks unless you happen to be in the top 1%. There's a glut of lawyers.

    A top 50 law company doesn't amount to much. They're typically paying solicitors with 3 -5 years experience between 35 and 55k which is a complete joke. A kwikfit fitter can make this sort of cash. You're better off learning how to operate a tower crane.
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    (Original post by Mega0448)
    Ok we get it you've got a half decent job. You've made a thread already bragging about it and now you're being a complete arse about it to other people. It's about time you got off your high horse. 28k in London isn't even that impressive.
    I wouldn't get out of bed for 28k a year but it's a good starting salary I suppose. I started on less.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    It was either that or being unemployed for the rest of my life and I'm contributing to society by paying my taxes.
    Also a lot of employers are looking for customer service along with office experience which obviously fewer graduates have.
    My manager also thinks I'm worth 24k if you don't have a job that earns you this much then please don't critique me, after all getting a degree is about getting more money isn't it for most people?
    God, you're a bit uppity aren't you? Got the painters in? I started off by saying I wasn't criticizing you! Oh, and don't worry about me - I earn a hell of a lot more that 24k.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    Amen.
    Have already given you a rep apparently
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    (Original post by Mega0448)
    Ok we get it you've got a half decent job. You've made a thread already bragging about it and now you're being a complete arse about it to other people. It's about time you got off your high horse. 28k in London isn't even that impressive.
    Don't be jealous,

    I highly doubt you earned anything close for your first job and maybe even don't now. Yeah it's low but it's my first job. FIRST.

    Plus it's in a lucrative field; programming. Look it up.

    Wasteman.
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    (Original post by edothero)
    All in all, don't expect an amazing job if you have little or no experience outside of university studies
    YOUR DEGREE CLASSIFICATION DOESN'T MATTER AS MUCH AS YOU THINK IT DOES (though obviously try to get minimum 2.1, nothing worse than 2.2 pls xD)

    rant over :woo::woo:
    Strongly agree. Nearly and almost every employer ARE expecting experience from candidates these days no matter if you have a fancy 2.1 or 1st class degree (not that I'm jealous) from CS with no experience.
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    I know someone with a 2:2 in Performance Studies (of all things) and he just set up his own business (tutoring), which he is doing reasonably well in thus far. Don't give up!
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    (Original post by MUN123)
    I graduated last month with a 2:2 in Computer science and since then I have been applying for graduate jobs non-stop with a lot of rejections. I then had to sign on JSA, now the Job center are advising me to work for free for 2 weeks in a call center to get "experience" which I've refused because I dislike to be exploited by the company and work for free in a field that does not interest me.

    I explained to the Job centers that I'm interested in IT jobs to which they replied that they would not be paying me benefits so that I could sit and wait for a very specific job. And after applying to loads of minimum wage jobs and getting loads of rejections they want me to work for free in some crappy job to get experience.

    The other day they sent me to a compulsory course which explained about how to use the internet to apply for jobs I thought it was laughable they must be stuck in the 90's. They have no clue on how to deal with graduates
    apply for school as an IT teacher or technitian, most of them pay above the minimum wage
 
 
 
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