Maths Uni Chat Watch

Oh I Really Don't Care
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#7001
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#7001
(Original post by around)
person a: hey i do steroids

person b: hey me too

girl: i can't believe you guys are taking drugs

persons a&b: no we don't
I can't be bothered explaining the in-joke but if you visit the bb.com site there are lots of people on steroids. However, they usually don't admit it [and call themselves naturalgraham and claim never to have done anything].

It really distorts what people think is attainable. So everyone usually says yeah I'm on steroids and am 5"4 120 lbs as a joke.

It doesn't sound funny but the responses are a continual play on this.

If natural grhaham were a photgrapher he wouldn't use the flash.

if natural graham were a food, hed be natural peanut butter

Psychology major here.

Naturalgraham is limited by his false sense of reality, so he claims to be natural in bodybuilding. He should look within himself and tell the truth.

Naturalgraham did not achieve his physique through freeweights or machine lifting, but through the natural use of the environment like pushing against a tree.

and so on.

It goes on like that - basically every thread is just in jokes and memes.
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harr
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#7002
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#7002
(Original post by tommm)
That's probably because Oxford is ****

edit: yay at how putting a winking emoticon avoids getting negged
I was going to +rep you, but then you put a winking emoticon.
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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#7003
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#7003
(Original post by tommm)
That's probably because Oxford is ****

edit: yay at how putting a winking emoticon avoids getting negged
I + repped. Would have negged for teh lulz if I knew that was your reason for putting the wink.
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shamika
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#7004
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#7004
(Original post by Jake22)
It is true that many books covering Lie Algebras also cover scary Geometry and/or Physics but there are some easier 'pure' Lie Algebra books, for example: Introduction to Lie Algebras by Karin Erdmann and Mark J. Wildon which is in the Springer Undergraduate Mathematics Series (SUMS) and has no prerequisites other than a basic familiarity with linear algebra. Essentially, the book introduces Lie Algebras and then leads up to a classification of the complex finite-dimensional reductive Lie Algebras (which are essentially everything you would see in practice).

Thanks - I'm going back to Imperial for a careers event so I might see if I can borrow it (with my current work schedule and studying for the most insanely boring exam ever - and that's including the accountancy ones - it's unlikely I'll get far though).

(Original post by around)
This is most problematic with the Metric and Topological Spaces course in 1st year - only now, in 3rd year, are we actually building up on stuff we did in Easter 1st year.

of course, a lot of 2nd year courses were helped by taking that course, but none could expect knowledge of met+top.
But technically its a second year course even if its lectured in Easter so surely you could re-attend lectures if you wanted to? That way its actually only a term away from your functional analysis courses etc.?

Does none of your second year Analysis depend on Metric and Topological spaces?
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SimonM
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#7005
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#7005
(Original post by shamika)
But technically its a second year course even if its lectured in Easter so surely you could re-attend lectures if you wanted to? That way its actually only a term away from your functional analysis courses etc.?

Does none of your second year Analysis depend on Metric and Topological spaces?
Why would you re-attend lectures?

Yes, like he said, we build on it in Part II (Linear Analysis, Algebraic Topology etc).

No, everything which is needed is covered in Analysis II again. (Which is something which the tripos should fix)
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Simplicity
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#7006
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#7006
(Original post by Oh I Really Don't Care)
I think you're really behind as well too Simplicitly - it's absolutely vile and I would suggest even more study.

snip

P.S. the Artin-wedderburn theorem was covered in our second week. Enthralling.

P.P.S. I am back after the new year so have not officially joined though rugby and cross country. Of course I am interested in more but time is so scarce with effectively 7 week terms.
I was just looking back at posts from a year ago and SimonM was talking about galois theory. I don't know if it's just SimonM being geeky and reading ahead.

Cross country? is that worthwhile? I'm planning to do weights and HIT 3x a week sprinting. However, long distance running doesn't really do anything for me. You still planning to go to sandhurst?

(Original post by My Alt )
To be fair, I think you probably find that average income has a fairly large dependence on the university one studies at (if you take on those who are maths students.)

I didn't want all this anger - I was just pointing out how unfunny your previous post was
I need to see the stats. However, I never really been convinced by that particularly from anecdotal evidence. Like if you are doing history I can see why there would be a massive gap due to the uni you come from.
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shamika
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#7007
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(Original post by SimonM)
Why would you re-attend lectures?

Yes, like he said, we build on it in Part II (Linear Analysis, Algebraic Topology etc).

No, everything which is needed is covered in Analysis II again. (Which is something which the tripos should fix)
I'm not suggesting you should, just that if the gap of over a year for M&T to be used is too great then there is the option to take it in your 2nd year rather than the 1st.

I found that revising for an exam was a much better way of getting to grips with a concept and made it stick in my head when I needed it next year. In that sense it doesn't matter when it is lectured (as long as you have enough time to revise for it properly. That was why I was so incredulous at DFranklin's Topics in Algebra course.)
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alibee
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#7008
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#7008
Does anyone know of a good textbook for a differential equations module. I feel like my lecturer is talking dutch to me and I don't like his recommended book either. Thought maybe another perspective might help me work out what he's talking about....
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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#7009
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#7009
(Original post by Simplicity)
I was just looking back at posts from a year ago and SimonM was talking about galois theory. I don't know if it's just SimonM being geeky and reading ahead.

Cross country? is that worthwhile? I'm planning to do weights and HIT 3x a week sprinting. However, long distance running doesn't really do anything for me. You still planning to go to sandhurst?
Irrespective of where you are now remember in the future you have the option to take these courses. Galois theory is more of a last term 2nd year/ 3rd year introductory type course.

As mentioned, no-one is doing anything 'new'.

Okay good for you. I'll stick with x country though. I think that's far in the Horizon though I am heading towards it. Predicting 2.5 years in the future is difficult.

I take it you have a goal on becoming a graduate or lecturer slash researcher etc?
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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#7010
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#7010
(Original post by alibee)
Does anyone know of a good textbook for a differential equations module. I feel like my lecturer is talking dutch to me and I don't like his recommended book either. Thought maybe another perspective might help me work out what he's talking about....
Where do you study?
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qgujxj39
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#7011
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#7011
An observation I've made - every analysis lecturer I've had has had good handwriting, whereas every algebra lecturer has had terrible handwriting.
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around
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#7012
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(Original post by tommm)
An observation I've made - every analysis lecturer I've had has had good handwriting, whereas every algebra lecturer has had terrible handwriting.
Both GRM and Linear Algebra last year had amazing handwriting...
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alibee
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#7013
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#7013
(Original post by Oh I Really Don't Care)
Where do you study?
Southampton
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Simplicity
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#7014
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#7014
(Original post by Oh I Really Don't Care)
Irrespective of where you are now remember in the future option to take these courses. Galois theory is more of a last term 2nd year/ 3rd year introductory type course.

As mentioned, no-one is doing anything 'new'.

Okay good for you. I'll stick with x country though. I think that's far in the Horizon though I am heading towards it. Predicting 2.5 years in the future is difficult.

I take it you have a goal on becoming a graduate or lecturer slash researcher etc?
I suppose. But, like Galois theory is 1824. Doing something in the last year that is like 100 years old doesn't sound good.

Do you jog everyday and for how long? plus it going to be cold as hell in a few weeks. It's not that long. 2.5 years will go pass pretty quick.

I suppose it depends on grades. Like if I get a low first and can only go to crappy unis might not do it. Probably just become teacher if it doesn't happen.

(Original post by tommm)
An observation I've made - every analysis lecturer I've had has had good handwriting, whereas every algebra lecturer has had terrible handwriting.
I disagree. Group theorist have the worst hand writing.

Fun fact. 1 in 6000 have the ability to mirror write with their non dominate hand.
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qgujxj39
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#7015
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#7015
(Original post by around)
Both GRM and Linear Algebra last year had amazing handwriting...
I'm unsure how to interpret "amazing" in this context...


(Original post by Simplicity)
I disagree. Group theorist have the worst hand writing.
Groups \subseteq Algebra
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Simplicity
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#7016
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#7016
(Original post by tommm)
I'm unsure how to interpret "amazing" in this context...




Groups \subseteq Algebra
Calligraphy would be the optimal way to handwrite.

I class groups as number theory, not algebra. Literally, modular arithmetic, langrange's theorem.
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Jake22
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#7017
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#7017
(Original post by Simplicity)
I suppose. But, like Galois theory is 1824. Doing something in the last year that is like 100 years old doesn't sound good.
In that case, my PhD research is over 2000 years old because the genesis of the idea was an observation of Plato's.
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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#7018
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#7018
(Original post by alibee)
Southampton
What year are you [even better could you specify the syllabus? Picard's theorem etc? Or is this a method series of lectures?]

(Original post by Simplicity)
I suppose. But, like Galois theory is 1824. Doing something in the last year that is like 100 years old doesn't sound good.

Do you jog everyday and for how long? plus it going to be cold as hell in a few weeks. It's not that long. 2.5 years will go pass pretty quick.

I suppose it depends on grades. Like if I get a low first and can only go to crappy unis might not do it. Probably just become teacher if it doesn't happen.


I disagree. Group theorist have the worst hand writing.

Fun fact. 1 in 6000 have the ability to mirror write with their non dominate hand.
Once again my mind is full of phuck. I reccomend doing cardio a minimum of five days every week. If you are a beginner working up so you jog half an hour every weekday for 4 - 6 months will give you a good base.

I was involved in another endurance sport quite seriously though so I run if time is tight or it is a cross training day. 30 minute Fartlek or 1 hour at 68 - 75 %.

I suggest you listen to my first bit of advice and do not attempt doing anything like a 1 hour test from the get go; you will go further if you build up.

While I do not disagree about how fast years go by that does not detract from the sheer unpredictability of events that happens throughout even a single year.
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ambience
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#7019
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#7019
(Original post by Simplicity)
(Original post by tommm)
Groups \subseteq Algebra
I class groups as number theory, not algebra. Literally, modular arithmetic, langrange's theorem.
Nah.
Groups \subset Algebra, and there's a case for saying
Number Theory \subset Groups
(made by Saxl, IA, last year)
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Jake22
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#7020
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#7020
(Original post by Simplicity)
I class groups as number theory, not algebra. Literally, modular arithmetic, langrange's theorem.
Groups aren't always finite or even discrete.
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