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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Sorry to barge in, I've been catching up over the past few days and this looks like a lovely, supportive environment. I am due to begin an Early Primary PGCE at the University of Birmingham in September, and after battling severe anxiety during my final undergraduate year, I'm really concerned about coping with such an intense year. I'm a bit of a perfectionist (typical Virgo!) and put a huge amount of pressure on myself, alongside doubting everything I do, not an ideal mix at all. As much as I want to teach, I have had serious doubts about whether I will manage during PGCE, so to see so many people here have had similar issues and reached the end is reassuring. I just wondered if anyone has any advice or recommendations on how to deal with/manage anxiety with the intensity and pressure of balancing everything? Or if anyone has experienced this course at Birmingham and can advise how supportive the department is? My undergraduate degree was at Wolverhampton and I struggled on my own during the first two years only to have a breakdown during dissertation. While I received support from tutors and counselling, I can't help but think that having that support before things got so bad may have prevented the breakdown. Apologies for the ramble, I do tend to waffle!
    You only have one (funded) chance, so my advice would be to defer/reject the PGCE and get your anxiety sorted before the PGCE. Alternatively, go for the PGCE but have a detailed plan of what to do if you get anxious in the middle of the PGCE (as in having your counsellor/psychologist updated, a list of actions you can do to reduce your anxiety if it happens in the middle of the lesson, etc). Also, I would talk with your counsellor to get his/her opinion on this. In my opinion, undergrad is a breeze compared to the PGCE in terms of commitments and workload. You want to maximise your chances of completing it successfully!
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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Sorry to barge in, I've been catching up over the past few days and this looks like a lovely, supportive environment. I am due to begin an Early Primary PGCE at the University of Birmingham in September, and after battling severe anxiety during my final undergraduate year, I'm really concerned about coping with such an intense year. I'm a bit of a perfectionist (typical Virgo!) and put a huge amount of pressure on myself, alongside doubting everything I do, not an ideal mix at all. As much as I want to teach, I have had serious doubts about whether I will manage during PGCE, so to see so many people here have had similar issues and reached the end is reassuring. I just wondered if anyone has any advice or recommendations on how to deal with/manage anxiety with the intensity and pressure of balancing everything? Or if anyone has experienced this course at Birmingham and can advise how supportive the department is? My undergraduate degree was at Wolverhampton and I struggled on my own during the first two years only to have a breakdown during dissertation. While I received support from tutors and counselling, I can't help but think that having that support before things got so bad may have prevented the breakdown. Apologies for the ramble, I do tend to waffle!
    I am sure, Lily Rose can give you some advice too. She probably is, along with Mr. M, the most experienced here.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    I am sure, Lily Rose can give you some advice too. She probably is, along with Mr. M, the most experienced here.
    Well, certainly the oldest.....
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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Sorry to barge in, I've been catching up over the past few days and this looks like a lovely, supportive environment. I am due to begin an Early Primary PGCE at the University of Birmingham in September, and after battling severe anxiety during my final undergraduate year, I'm really concerned about coping with such an intense year. I'm a bit of a perfectionist (typical Virgo!) and put a huge amount of pressure on myself, alongside doubting everything I do, not an ideal mix at all. As much as I want to teach, I have had serious doubts about whether I will manage during PGCE, so to see so many people here have had similar issues and reached the end is reassuring. I just wondered if anyone has any advice or recommendations on how to deal with/manage anxiety with the intensity and pressure of balancing everything? Or if anyone has experienced this course at Birmingham and can advise how supportive the department is? My undergraduate degree was at Wolverhampton and I struggled on my own during the first two years only to have a breakdown during dissertation. While I received support from tutors and counselling, I can't help but think that having that support before things got so bad may have prevented the breakdown. Apologies for the ramble, I do tend to waffle!
    Hello. Thanks for coming to TSR to ask this. I'm going to echo what Juichiro says here. At the risk of making myself unpopular, my honest, candid opinion, based on 32 years of teaching and 8 years of being a subject mentor is: not yet. I think you are setting yourself up for a terrifying year if you start out on it without sorting out your anxiety issues before you embark on it. Teaching is a really tough job even when you are qualified, and the training is a baptism of fire. I have no reason to doubt that you will be able to make a go of it and be a fine teacher when the moment is right, but my answer is still: not yet.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Well, certainly the oldest.....
    And certainly, the most lovely.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    And certainly, the most lovely.
    Aww, shucks!
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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Sorry to barge in, I've been catching up over the past few days and this looks like a lovely, supportive environment. I am due to begin an Early Primary PGCE at the University of Birmingham in September, and after battling severe anxiety during my final undergraduate year, I'm really concerned about coping with such an intense year. I'm a bit of a perfectionist (typical Virgo!) and put a huge amount of pressure on myself, alongside doubting everything I do, not an ideal mix at all. As much as I want to teach, I have had serious doubts about whether I will manage during PGCE, so to see so many people here have had similar issues and reached the end is reassuring. I just wondered if anyone has any advice or recommendations on how to deal with/manage anxiety with the intensity and pressure of balancing everything? Or if anyone has experienced this course at Birmingham and can advise how supportive the department is? My undergraduate degree was at Wolverhampton and I struggled on my own during the first two years only to have a breakdown during dissertation. While I received support from tutors and counselling, I can't help but think that having that support before things got so bad may have prevented the breakdown. Apologies for the ramble, I do tend to waffle!
    It depends how your anxiety presents itself. I have anxiety and OCD (and other stuff too that is very well managed now) and I made it through but it was hard work. You'll have the standard worries intensified and there are already going to be a lot of worries.

    I struggled to get going in the classroom because my anxiety was holding me back. It took a lot longer for my confidence to kick in and I struggled so much through placement one to make friends with my department and other teachers. I also spent so much time worrying about not being good enough or not producing good enough resources, or being assessed or having observations that I just got really stuck. I felt like a fraud pretending to be a teacher and my anxiety and OCD went insane.

    If your anxiety is something gentle that you control well and have strategies for then go for it. If not, take that time out to figure everything out. I had those strategies and I still almost gave up half way through.

    It's hard without anxiety, but with it you're really going to be pushing yourself out of that comfort zone/safe mindspace.

    This probably isn't what you want to hear but you only get one chance at your pgce year and you don't want to blow it if there's any doubt at all that you aren't ready yet.

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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Sorry to barge in, I've been catching up over the past few days and this looks like a lovely, supportive environment. I am due to begin an Early Primary PGCE at the University of Birmingham in September, and after battling severe anxiety during my final undergraduate year, I'm really concerned about coping with such an intense year. I'm a bit of a perfectionist (typical Virgo!) and put a huge amount of pressure on myself, alongside doubting everything I do, not an ideal mix at all. As much as I want to teach, I have had serious doubts about whether I will manage during PGCE, so to see so many people here have had similar issues and reached the end is reassuring. I just wondered if anyone has any advice or recommendations on how to deal with/manage anxiety with the intensity and pressure of balancing everything? Or if anyone has experienced this course at Birmingham and can advise how supportive the department is? My undergraduate degree was at Wolverhampton and I struggled on my own during the first two years only to have a breakdown during dissertation. While I received support from tutors and counselling, I can't help but think that having that support before things got so bad may have prevented the breakdown. Apologies for the ramble, I do tend to waffle!
    Hey, I'm so glad we come across as a nice caring environment

    I have anxiety and needed quite a lot of support and counselling during my undergraduate degree. I really felt sick and ill about starting my PGCE because of how intense it is supposed to be and I wasn't sure I was ready. I am also a perfectionist (and a Virgo but I don't follow all that stuff!) so knew I may be disheartened on the PGCE. So allow me to share my experiences...

    The anxiety has not been easy to manage over the course of the year. It seemed like every single day presented a new challenge that I had to conquer in terms of my anxiety, and every single time I got an inch close to running away and literally walking out of school and quitting. Yet I never did. And each time that I stuck there and did whatever it was, I became stronger. Sorry this may end up being a cheesy paragraph, but I undoubtedly believe that the PGCE has helped my anxiety and my confidence issues. It is still there, but I feel like I have a strength in my head now that can help me against it. It is hard to explain.

    But, I guess what I'm trying to say is that sure, it is easy to say wait until you get your anxiety sorted out, but I don't think anxiety really gets sorted out? If you know what I mean. Certainly I don't think mine will ever go away with any amount of meds or counselling. I think it is better to just face things head on and try them. I was always prepared to drop out if it became too much - it was always an option. I am glad that I did it. I did have a lot of counselling during my first placement and it without a doubt got me through it. I don't believe I'd have made it through without them. They were amazing. I've not had much success from counselling in the past but I hated my first placement school and saw my uni counsellor and he was just so supportive and helpful. So don't be afraid to ask for help in that regard.

    In terms of the PGCE intensity, I did find it hard but I didn't find it as hard as people made out. I'd seen quite a few people go through the PGCE before me and they all looked so fried and upset, coming home crying all the time, it's enough to make you run away! The last couple of months are the hardest, but I feel I made them harder on myself as I became lazy so wasn't doing anything in advance anymore!

    Advice on how to manage anxiety/pressure during the PGCE:
    - Try very hard to stay up to date. Don't leave things until last minute. Getting your stuff planned a week in advance helps loads, and I was good with this until Easter when I did nothing all holiday :P

    - DO NOT compare yourself to others!!! I can't stress this enough. There will be people who make out as if they are God's gift to teaching when remember...you haven't seen them teach! Plus everyone has such different experiences between schools. You just can't compare. It's pointless.

    - However...do share tips/resources! Don't be afraid to ask your fellow course mates for advice. We shared a lot and I gained things from that. It's not a sign of weakness.

    - The same goes for asking for help from uni/school. You should, in theory, have a supportive mentor and uni tutor. They should support you. I was generally unimpressed with the support from university so I relied on my school who were excellent. Don't feel needy.

    - Don't panic about observations. I made myself unnecessarily ill over these. They are watching the pupils more than YOU! And even if they go terribly (I had one which was a disaster), most of the time it does not matter. It is not the end of the world. Observers want to give you helpful feedback and for the most part they are understanding of issues.

    - Have fun!! Seriously, on my first placement I was so serious about everything - my planning and my targets, etc, that I feel I forgot that I am teaching 11-16 year olds (and even younger for you) and that these lessons need to be fun, for them and for me. By the end of my second placement my lessons were enjoyable for myself and the pupils. I think it is something that comes naturally with time. It is about learning that you don't always have to stick to your lesson plan to a T. It is learning to adapt from it and be more casual.


    I don't really know if anything there works. I'm pretty bored so went on a bit of a rant but maybe you've fished something out. My advice would be not to wait a year. I'd face this PGCE head on. Trust me, if I can do it, you can!! I am a mess! Mental health does not determine how you will deal with the PGCE. I've seen people who seem strong as nails crack from the pressure and drop out. Go for it. Just remember to seek support and ask for help when needed.

    Good luck whatever you do.

    EDIT: Holy crap didn't realise how long this was. Apologies . I should sleep...
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    My best advice would be let them know about any issues like this asap. Remember these are people that work in education, mostly ex teachers or even current on a break teachers so they on the whole should be understanding and supportive. All the tutors on my course certainly were.

    Talk to others on your course to help you see that everyone is having similar stresses, it really helps!

    Brace yourself for the says when they explain lots (first few days and placement prep days). These are fun and exciting, especially the first few days of the course (which are way less nerve wracking than you expect in the days before you start), but you also get a lot of information which can be overwhelming I.e. ONLY 14 DAYS TILL I GO ON PLACEMENT!!!!! or I HAVE TO DO 20 HOURS A WEEK?!?!?! or HOW MANY ESSAYS?!?!. But actually, when you do it, they do it small steps at a time and ease you in to it. They just give you all the information so you know what's coming. So try to keep calm in those and just focus on the things you need to do now, the others will come as you go along.

    Also good luck, and have fun. Early years is amazing

    Xxx

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you for the reply, and for the hints on what to expect. I do tend to do the whole "OMG I CAN'T DO THAT" initially, but thinking in small steps should help! I'm glad to hear you had a positive experience with supportive tutors, I think that makes such a difference. So glad to hear from someone else Early Years too! xxx

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    You only have one (funded) chance, so my advice would be to defer/reject the PGCE and get your anxiety sorted before the PGCE. Alternatively, go for the PGCE but have a detailed plan of what to do if you get anxious in the middle of the PGCE (as in having your counsellor/psychologist updated, a list of actions you can do to reduce your anxiety if it happens in the middle of the lesson, etc). Also, I would talk with your counsellor to get his/her opinion on this. In my opinion, undergrad is a breeze compared to the PGCE in terms of commitments and workload. You want to maximise your chances of completing it successfully!
    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Hello. Thanks for coming to TSR to ask this. I'm going to echo what Juichiro says here. At the risk of making myself unpopular, my honest, candid opinion, based on 32 years of teaching and 8 years of being a subject mentor is: not yet. I think you are setting yourself up for a terrifying year if you start out on it without sorting out your anxiety issues before you embark on it. Teaching is a really tough job even when you are qualified, and the training is a baptism of fire. I have no reason to doubt that you will be able to make a go of it and be a fine teacher when the moment is right, but my answer is still: not yet.
    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    It depends how your anxiety presents itself. I have anxiety and OCD (and other stuff too that is very well managed now) and I made it through but it was hard work. You'll have the standard worries intensified and there are already going to be a lot of worries.

    I struggled to get going in the classroom because my anxiety was holding me back. It took a lot longer for my confidence to kick in and I struggled so much through placement one to make friends with my department and other teachers. I also spent so much time worrying about not being good enough or not producing good enough resources, or being assessed or having observations that I just got really stuck. I felt like a fraud pretending to be a teacher and my anxiety and OCD went insane.

    If your anxiety is something gentle that you control well and have strategies for then go for it. If not, take that time out to figure everything out. I had those strategies and I still almost gave up half way through.

    It's hard without anxiety, but with it you're really going to be pushing yourself out of that comfort zone/safe mindspace.

    This probably isn't what you want to hear but you only get one chance at your pgce year and you don't want to blow it if there's any doubt at all that you aren't ready yet.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you all for taking the time to reply. I have considered taking a year out, but unfortunately I know that my anxiety won't ever go away, it subsides from time to time but is always ready to pounce again! There is also a part of me that thinks that without my anxiety I wouldn't do as well. I will be graduating with a First despite the breakdown - makes me feel silly for stressing and panicking so much but somehow it worked! I just want to feel more in control of it, and to feel less emotionally worn out. I will certainly take your advice on speaking with a counsellor and building up coping strategies, thank you.


    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Hey, I'm so glad we come across as a nice caring environment

    I have anxiety and needed quite a lot of support and counselling during my undergraduate degree. I really felt sick and ill about starting my PGCE because of how intense it is supposed to be and I wasn't sure I was ready. I am also a perfectionist (and a Virgo but I don't follow all that stuff!) so knew I may be disheartened on the PGCE. So allow me to share my experiences...

    The anxiety has not been easy to manage over the course of the year. It seemed like every single day presented a new challenge that I had to conquer in terms of my anxiety, and every single time I got an inch close to running away and literally walking out of school and quitting. Yet I never did. And each time that I stuck there and did whatever it was, I became stronger. Sorry this may end up being a cheesy paragraph, but I undoubtedly believe that the PGCE has helped my anxiety and my confidence issues. It is still there, but I feel like I have a strength in my head now that can help me against it. It is hard to explain.

    But, I guess what I'm trying to say is that sure, it is easy to say wait until you get your anxiety sorted out, but I don't think anxiety really gets sorted out? If you know what I mean. Certainly I don't think mine will ever go away with any amount of meds or counselling. I think it is better to just face things head on and try them. I was always prepared to drop out if it became too much - it was always an option. I am glad that I did it. I did have a lot of counselling during my first placement and it without a doubt got me through it. I don't believe I'd have made it through without them. They were amazing. I've not had much success from counselling in the past but I hated my first placement school and saw my uni counsellor and he was just so supportive and helpful. So don't be afraid to ask for help in that regard.

    In terms of the PGCE intensity, I did find it hard but I didn't find it as hard as people made out. I'd seen quite a few people go through the PGCE before me and they all looked so fried and upset, coming home crying all the time, it's enough to make you run away! The last couple of months are the hardest, but I feel I made them harder on myself as I became lazy so wasn't doing anything in advance anymore!

    Advice on how to manage anxiety/pressure during the PGCE:
    - Try very hard to stay up to date. Don't leave things until last minute. Getting your stuff planned a week in advance helps loads, and I was good with this until Easter when I did nothing all holiday :P

    - DO NOT compare yourself to others!!! I can't stress this enough. There will be people who make out as if they are God's gift to teaching when remember...you haven't seen them teach! Plus everyone has such different experiences between schools. You just can't compare. It's pointless.

    - However...do share tips/resources! Don't be afraid to ask your fellow course mates for advice. We shared a lot and I gained things from that. It's not a sign of weakness.

    - The same goes for asking for help from uni/school. You should, in theory, have a supportive mentor and uni tutor. They should support you. I was generally unimpressed with the support from university so I relied on my school who were excellent. Don't feel needy.

    - Don't panic about observations. I made myself unnecessarily ill over these. They are watching the pupils more than YOU! And even if they go terribly (I had one which was a disaster), most of the time it does not matter. It is not the end of the world. Observers want to give you helpful feedback and for the most part they are understanding of issues.

    - Have fun!! Seriously, on my first placement I was so serious about everything - my planning and my targets, etc, that I feel I forgot that I am teaching 11-16 year olds (and even younger for you) and that these lessons need to be fun, for them and for me. By the end of my second placement my lessons were enjoyable for myself and the pupils. I think it is something that comes naturally with time. It is about learning that you don't always have to stick to your lesson plan to a T. It is learning to adapt from it and be more casual.


    I don't really know if anything there works. I'm pretty bored so went on a bit of a rant but maybe you've fished something out. My advice would be not to wait a year. I'd face this PGCE head on. Trust me, if I can do it, you can!! I am a mess! Mental health does not determine how you will deal with the PGCE. I've seen people who seem strong as nails crack from the pressure and drop out. Go for it. Just remember to seek support and ask for help when needed.

    Good luck whatever you do.

    EDIT: Holy crap didn't realise how long this was. Apologies . I should sleep...
    Thank you so much for taking the time to write such an in-depth reply, and for sharing your experience. Considering you've mentioned the difficulties, this comes across as a really positive post, while I don't know you it seems you have really benefited from your experience. I think that's what I need to focus on. You've made me look at my undergraduate degree differently too. I initially went to uni straight after A Levels but was so overwhelmed I dropped out after 5 weeks and worked for 2 years. While my anxiety definitely got stronger during my second attempt, I fought back to finish, so I must have grown stronger too. I hope that makes sense. It's so hard to see your own accomplishments most of the time. It's taken me a long time to realise that it's ok to need help and support too. Thank you so much for all of your advice. Your students will benefit so much from how supportive and empathetic you are

    One last thing - What would your recommendation be for over the summer? I have made sure to schedule time in for family and friends and will be having appointments with a new counsellor, but should I be worried about reading and preparing for next year?
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    Does anyone know when you can start applying for PGCE's through UCAS for 2016 entry?
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    Does anyone know when you can start applying for PGCE's through UCAS for 2016 entry?
    UCAS 2016 doesn't open until mid September.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    UCAS 2016 doesn't open until mid September.
    Does Oxbridge applications for PGCE have to be in early as with undergraduates?
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    Does Oxbridge applications for PGCE have to be in early as with undergraduates?
    I'm afraid I honestly don't know the answer to that one, but I would think not. Look on Ucas itself or call up and check.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    I'm afraid I honestly don't know the answer to that one, but I would think not. Look on Ucas itself or call up and check.
    Thanks bae
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    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Thank you for the reply, and for the hints on what to expect. I do tend to do the whole "OMG I CAN'T DO THAT" initially, but thinking in small steps should help! I'm glad to hear you had a positive experience with supportive tutors, I think that makes such a difference. So glad to hear from someone else Early Years too! xxx







    Thank you all for taking the time to reply. I have considered taking a year out, but unfortunately I know that my anxiety won't ever go away, it subsides from time to time but is always ready to pounce again! There is also a part of me that thinks that without my anxiety I wouldn't do as well. I will be graduating with a First despite the breakdown - makes me feel silly for stressing and panicking so much but somehow it worked! I just want to feel more in control of it, and to feel less emotionally worn out. I will certainly take your advice on speaking with a counsellor and building up coping strategies, thank you.




    Thank you so much for taking the time to write such an in-depth reply, and for sharing your experience. Considering you've mentioned the difficulties, this comes across as a really positive post, while I don't know you it seems you have really benefited from your experience. I think that's what I need to focus on. You've made me look at my undergraduate degree differently too. I initially went to uni straight after A Levels but was so overwhelmed I dropped out after 5 weeks and worked for 2 years. While my anxiety definitely got stronger during my second attempt, I fought back to finish, so I must have grown stronger too. I hope that makes sense. It's so hard to see your own accomplishments most of the time. It's taken me a long time to realise that it's ok to need help and support too. Thank you so much for all of your advice. Your students will benefit so much from how supportive and empathetic you are

    One last thing - What would your recommendation be for over the summer? I have made sure to schedule time in for family and friends and will be having appointments with a new counsellor, but should I be worried about reading and preparing for next year?
    It's no problem!! I did the same thing as you with my undergraduate - started straight after A-Levels then dropped out and started again a year later. So yes, you would have grown from your undergrad alone. The pgce is another chance to build on that.

    My advice for the summer is to do nothing. Absolutely nothing. I did nothing and looking back there was nothing I needed to do anyway.

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    I'm another person asking a question about PGCE/Schools Direct...

    Do the courses actually teach you how to teach (techniques, etc) or do they expect you to already have these basic teaching skills? I've seen most interviews ask you to 'teach' a 5 minute lesson to a small group. What kind of things do you learn on your PGCE?
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    (Original post by charl0tte90)
    I'm another person asking a question about PGCE/Schools Direct...

    Do the courses actually teach you how to teach (techniques, etc) or do they expect you to already have these basic teaching skills? I've seen most interviews ask you to 'teach' a 5 minute lesson to a small group. What kind of things do you learn on your PGCE?
    They'll teach you how to teach and they'll show you how pupils learn. They pretty much want to see some sort of potential/competency when they ask for those micro-teaches at interview. If they see something they can work with then they'll help you develop that. You learn about the different types of pupils, lots of pedagogy and a couple of bits about your subject.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    do nothing. Absolutely nothing.Posted from TSR Mobile
    I agree. Having a restful summer is the best preparation you can have before starting the PGCE.
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    (Original post by charl0tte90)
    I'm another person asking a question about PGCE/Schools Direct...

    Do the courses actually teach you how to teach (techniques, etc) or do they expect you to already have these basic teaching skills? I've seen most interviews ask you to 'teach' a 5 minute lesson to a small group. What kind of things do you learn on your PGCE?
    They'll look for potential and a passion for teaching - I very much believe that some people are more suited to teaching than others.

    (Original post by rach.elizabeth)
    Thank you for the reply, and for the hints on what to expect. I do tend to do the whole "OMG I CAN'T DO THAT" initially, but thinking in small steps should help! I'm glad to hear you had a positive experience with supportive tutors, I think that makes such a difference. So glad to hear from someone else Early Years too! xxx

    Thank you all for taking the time to reply. I have considered taking a year out, but unfortunately I know that my anxiety won't ever go away, it subsides from time to time but is always ready to pounce again! There is also a part of me that thinks that without my anxiety I wouldn't do as well. I will be graduating with a First despite the breakdown - makes me feel silly for stressing and panicking so much but somehow it worked! I just want to feel more in control of it, and to feel less emotionally worn out. I will certainly take your advice on speaking with a counsellor and building up coping strategies, thank you.




    Thank you so much for taking the time to write such an in-depth reply, and for sharing your experience. Considering you've mentioned the difficulties, this comes across as a really positive post, while I don't know you it seems you have really benefited from your experience. I think that's what I need to focus on. You've made me look at my undergraduate degree differently too. I initially went to uni straight after A Levels but was so overwhelmed I dropped out after 5 weeks and worked for 2 years. While my anxiety definitely got stronger during my second attempt, I fought back to finish, so I must have grown stronger too. I hope that makes sense. It's so hard to see your own accomplishments most of the time. It's taken me a long time to realise that it's ok to need help and support too. Thank you so much for all of your advice. Your students will benefit so much from how supportive and empathetic you are

    One last thing - What would your recommendation be for over the summer? I have made sure to schedule time in for family and friends and will be having appointments with a new counsellor, but should I be worried about reading and preparing for next year?
    Don't do anything over summer. Seriously, you don't need to!
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    (Original post by Samus2)
    They'll look for potential and a passion for teaching - I very much believe that some people are more suited to teaching than others.



    Don't do anything over summer. Seriously, you don't need to!
    Thank you Seems I've been given permission to put my feet up and catch up on tv!
 
 
 
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    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

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