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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    I can't believe I'm saying this, but I agree. I'd love to see what a parallel world would look like where the Lib Dems somehow managed to win a majority in 2010.
    They are genuine social liberals so it would be quite different in that regard but economically I think the difference would be smaller than most think.
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    Can't say I have much sympathy for Clegg at all. He's been in Government, he's been able to actually implement some of his policies. With tuition fees, it's not so much the change but the way it was presented. Correct me if I'm wrong, but he's never criticised the policy - sure, he's said compromises were necessary when in coalition but he stopped short of saying he'd honour the pledge had he been elected. It will be really interesting to see the Lib Dem manifesto for the next election in that regard. I largely approve of the role of the Lib Dems in government in general, but seeing my tuition fees every term leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

    Of the leaders of the five major political parties, Miliband has my support more than most. Thankless task being completely unpresentable. I can't say I'm overly impressed with the way Natalie Bennett comes across in soundbites (although everyone has one - 'the common good' 'cost of living crisis' 'securing Britain's economic recovery') but seeing her talk at length is a great experience.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Can't say I have much sympathy for Clegg at all. He's been in Government, he's been able to actually implement some of his policies. With tuition fees, it's not so much the change but the way it was presented. Correct me if I'm wrong, but he's never criticised the policy - sure, he's said compromises were necessary when in coalition but he stopped short of saying he'd honour the pledge had he been elected. It will be really interesting to see the Lib Dem manifesto for the next election in that regard. I largely approve of the role of the Lib Dems in government in general, but seeing my tuition fees every term leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

    Of the leaders of the five major political parties, Miliband has my support more than most. Thankless task being completely unpresentable. I can't say I'm overly impressed with the way Natalie Bennett comes across in soundbites (although everyone has one - 'the common good' 'cost of living crisis' 'securing Britain's economic recovery') but seeing her talk at length is a great experience.
    Interestingly a poll by Lord Ashcroft some time ago suggested that 35% of people would prefer another coalition (non specific) over a majority government. So in that sense one of the Libs aims (to make people appreciate coalition governments) has been complete. Their public relations are terrible given how much they've actually done though, yet how little people know.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Interestingly a poll by Lord Ashcroft some time ago suggested that 35% of people would prefer another coalition (non specific) over a majority government. So in that sense one of the Libs aims (to make people appreciate coalition governments) has been complete. Their public relations are terrible given how much they've actually done though, yet how little people know.
    For now, the Lib Dems time in coalition will be defined by tuition fees and the collapse in trust. No amount of PR genius could fix that, as shown by their hopeless showings in pretty much every election since. If the next government is 100% Tory like I expect, then their legacy will be viewed in a different light, particularly if Cameron bows down to the right of the party on social matters. I hope they recover eventually or another party (*cough* Greens *cough*) takes their place; we need a third major party.
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    If the Lib Dems can get rid of Nick Clegg and take perhaps a decade out to rebrand themselves I can see the party rising from its current ashes in the long term, whilst clinging on to its core seats during that period. Whether justly or not, Clegg simply isn't a figure many former party voters will be willing to support.
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    If the Lib Dems can get rid of Nick Clegg and take perhaps a decade out to rebrand themselves I can see the party rising from its current ashes in the long term, whilst clinging on to its core seats during that period. Whether justly or not, Clegg simply isn't a figure many former party voters will be willing to support.
    The problem i see for the Lib Dems is that UK politics defines parties economically rather than socially. So if they get rid of Clegg then they still have the same problem that their a mix or they'd have to point one way in which case they lose members from the other side.

    For example, there are several on here who would leave a rabidly right Tory party for the Lib Dems.. if only we were sure they'd stay right of center. Equally they had ex Labourites because of a string of left leaning leaders.
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    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    If the Lib Dems can get rid of Nick Clegg and take perhaps a decade out to rebrand themselves I can see the party rising from its current ashes in the long term, whilst clinging on to its core seats during that period. Whether justly or not, Clegg simply isn't a figure many former party voters will be willing to support.
    I fully expect to see Tim Farron as leader next year if he can hold his seat.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    I fully expect to see Tim Farron as leader next year if he can hold his seat.
    I hope he's not, he's awful. A complete wet.

    Now Danny Alexander, David Laws or Browne.. they'd make me pay attention.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I hope he's not, he's awful. A complete wet.

    Now Danny Alexander, David Laws or Browne.. they'd make me pay attention.
    Alexander and Laws are both far too closely related to the coalition which they'll want to get away from, whereas Browne seems again definitely from the right of the party. I think they'll look towards a social democratic who wasn't in cabinet and Farron is the obvious answer there.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    I fully expect to see Tim Farron as leader next year if he can hold his seat.
    Farron will not be the man to improve the Lib Dems' fortunes. Not presentable enough, and can't project significance in his speech. I agree, he'll likely be elected by a landslide, but they need someone more radically different to Clegg, and not just in terms of politics. Alistair Carmichael would be my choice if he's interested.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    The problem i see for the Lib Dems is that UK politics defines parties economically rather than socially. So if they get rid of Clegg then they still have the same problem that their a mix or they'd have to point one way in which case they lose members from the other side.

    For example, there are several on here who would leave a rabidly right Tory party for the Lib Dems.. if only we were sure they'd stay right of center. Equally they had ex Labourites because of a string of left leaning leaders.
    Yeah, good point. I think the UK could definitely benefit from a socially liberal party that doesn't lean particularly far either way economically, though it's not one I'd probably vote for myself.

    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    I fully expect to see Tim Farron as leader next year if he can hold his seat.
    I don't know a lot about him - he's to the party's left, isn't he?

    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I hope he's not, he's awful. A complete wet.

    Now Danny Alexander, David Laws or Browne.. they'd make me pay attention.
    Danny Alexander will be extremely lucky to keep his seat. Most polls I've seen would indicate his constituency swinging to the SNP.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Farron will not be the man to improve the Lib Dems' fortunes. Not presentable enough, and can't project significance in his speech. I agree, he'll likely be elected by a landslide, but they need someone more radically different to Clegg, and not just in terms of politics. Alistair Carmichael would be my choice if he's interested.
    He's not seemed that bad when I've heard him speak, and I think someone radically different to Clegg's politics may be enough - he never had that big a style problem. I'm no expert on Carmichael though to be honest.

    (Original post by Blue Meltwater)
    Yeah, good point. I think the UK could definitely benefit from a socially liberal party that doesn't lean particularly far either way economically, though it's not one I'd probably vote for myself.

    I don't know a lot about him - he's to the party's left, isn't he?

    Danny Alexander will be extremely lucky to keep his seat. Most polls I've seen would indicate his constituency swinging to the SNP.
    Yep, regarded as the main left-wing choice to replace Clegg. Helped by the fact he has one of the biggest LD majorities in the country, and with the Tories in second rather than Labour.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    He's not seemed that bad when I've heard him speak, and I think someone radically different to Clegg's politics may be enough - he never had that big a style problem. I'm no expert on Carmichael though to be honest.

    .
    Too earnest. Difficult to take seriously. I like him and would be much more inclined to vote Lib Dem with him as leader than any of the Orange Bookers, but I think the public will view him as just another wet fish like Clegg. Carmichael is MP for Shetland & Orkney, which will be Liberal until the end of time.

    It's a real shame my MP Julian Huppert will in all likelihood lose his Cambridge seat. He's fantastic, the only scientist in the House!
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Too earnest. Difficult to take seriously. I like him and would be much more inclined to vote Lib Dem with him as leader than any of the Orange Bookers, but I think the public will view him as just another wet fish like Clegg. Carmichael is MP for Shetland & Orkney, which will be Liberal until the end of time.

    It's a real shame my MP Julian Huppert will in all likelihood lose his Cambridge seat. He's fantastic, the only scientist in the House!
    I expect they'd seem him differently, especially if he bought out a couple of eye-catching policies early.

    I'm a big fan of Huppert's but sadly have to agree with your assessment. What with all the students (not all of whom are rich sods especially with Anglia Ruskin being there too!) as well as the fact it's a small majority I can't see him holding on. He's a good MP but his party will let him down.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    I expect they'd seem him differently, especially if he bought out a couple of eye-catching policies early.

    I'm a big fan of Huppert's but sadly have to agree with your assessment. What with all the students (not all of whom are rich sods especially with Anglia Ruskin being there too!) as well as the fact it's a small majority I can't see him holding on. He's a good MP but his party will let him down.
    Ahem, as one of the 'rich sods' I feel obliged to tell you that 2/3 of Cambridge Uni students are state-educated! Julian's practically a Green MP in all but name. Met him a few times and he's got so much energy, he genuinely loves his job and doesn't take any of it for granted. Exactly the kind of MP we need. And the Labour candidate for the region has already used the 'he's never had a proper job so he can't represent the people' tactic which instantly switched me off.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Ahem, as one of the 'rich sods' I feel obliged to tell you that 2/3 of Cambridge Uni students are state-educated! Julian's practically a Green MP in all but name. Met him a few times and he's got so much energy, he genuinely loves his job and doesn't take any of it for granted. Exactly the kind of MP we need. And the Labour candidate for the region has already used the 'he's never had a proper job so he can't represent the people' tactic which instantly switched me off.
    Didn't mean it like that, sorry could well have phrased it better! Just saying that it's not like it's reputation, especially considering the oft-forgotten second uni in town Oh those Labourites are so annoying. I don't like this whole anti-career politician thing. Uhm, is it meant to be bad that someone has always been passionate about politics and serving people and was inspired by it? I see the advantages of people from different backgrounds being in power but not have had a so-called "proper job" is not even vaguely an issue for me!
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    In other news, Jim McGuinness has resigned as the Donegal senior football team manager. I'm devastated
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Carmichael is MP for Shetland & Orkney, which will be Liberal until the end of time.
    *Sigh*
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    In other news, Jim McGuinness has resigned as the Donegal senior football team manager. I'm devastated
    Sad news for Donegal, considering how much they have progressed
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    What do you think of the ruling in this situation?

    Teenager A and teenager B start a little bit of pushing and shoving in school. Teenager A starts attacking teenager B at school. Teenager B retaliates by throwing a single punch at teenager A. Teenager B's punch hits the head sending teenager A to hospital. Teenager A dies three days later from blunt force trauma to the head. Teenager B is not to be charged for manslaughter. Court says teenager A was the aggressor. News article link.

    I support the decision not to charge teenager B but fear if a similar event was to occur in the UK teenager B would be charged for manslaughter. Apparently it is never the answer to fight back, in self-defence or not in self-defence.

 
 
 
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