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    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    My FPTP vs AMS/STV revision consists solely of learning a 15/15 essay our teacher gave us.
    could you post it on the student room for us please?
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Ps. I have loads of essays so If anyone needs any let me know.

    could i get pmed health/wealth essay/ social economic inequalities still exist essay or just any section B ones. Also have you done party list?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Ps. I have loads of essays so If anyone needs any let me know.
    could you post any section b ones you have , and possibly a global security couple if possible
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    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    Are you learning about the DFID for Africa?
    I was just going to mention it, for the UN say 'it works in partnership with organisations like the DFID which links all its development work with the UNs 8 MDGs' and then give an example.
    Similar thing for NGOs, as a advantage of NGOs I'd say 'it works in partnership with other organisations, e.g between 2006-11 Save the Children worked with the DFID on the MDG to reduce child mortality'
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Ps. I have loads of essays so If anyone needs any let me know.
    You don't by any chance have AMS vs FPTP do you? I really need an example essay for that and it would be such a great help!
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    I think the exam will be.

    AMS/STV v FPTP for voting audit Scotland recently put on statistics for Stv (the man who writes the exams runs this website so I'm taking that as a hint)

    Wealth inequalities and government responses for health and wealth, but I'm praying for lifestyles.

    Ethnic minorities influencing elections for America!

    definitely factors affecting development for Africa.

    Dme- minimum alcohol pricing or health in general.
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    (Original post by Beccabarrow)
    I think the exam will be.

    AMS/STV v FPTP for voting audit Scotland recently put on statistics for Stv (the man who writes the exams runs this website so I'm taking that as a hint)

    Wealth inequalities and government responses for health and wealth, but I'm praying for lifestyles.

    Ethnic minorities influencing elections for America!

    definitely factors affecting development for Africa.

    Dme- minimum alcohol pricing or health in general.
    have you got a link to the voting systems website news thing? Thanks.
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    (Original post by HannahRH_)
    Could you please message me it or a plan of what's in it as in my prelim I didn't study it and only got nine. Thanks
    I shall type it up later and PM it to you. Bear in mind though, it's not actually my essay, but one which was done a year or so ago by another student my teacher taught.
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    (Original post by Rossco18)
    could you post it on the student room for us please?
    I'll PM it you later once I've typed it up, although as I've said it's not actually my original work as it was done by a pupil my teacher taught a few years ago.
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    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    I shall type it up later and PM it to you. Bear in mind though, it's not actually my essay, but one which was done a year or so ago by another student my teacher taught.
    Would you be able to send me a copy too? It would be such a huge help!
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    (Original post by Beccabarrow)
    I think the exam will be.

    AMS/STV v FPTP for voting audit Scotland recently put on statistics for Stv (the man who writes the exams runs this website)
    That's very interesting...
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    (Original post by Supertwadds)
    That's very interesting...
    I know haha! It's pretty much what everyone else has said, I just hope a question does not come up that we've never seen before or the party list!
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    Beccabarrow, do you think you could post the link of the website for the STV statistics please ???
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    (Original post by 2013exams)
    Beccabarrow, do you think you could post the link of the website for the STV statistics please ???
    My teacher handed it out in paper but I could try and type it out?
    I have two essays for ams 15/15 and 12/15 for stv if anyone wants them I could email them has anyone got any wealth essays?
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    what is everyone studying for decision making in central government 1B, starting to panic ?
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    Backbench MPs essay
    To some extent Backbench MP’s are highly influential particularly due to the current government being a coalition.
    Firstly, Every bill must pass through the house of commons in which the government ( prime minister mainly) needs support to pass a bill. An MP can support the bill & vote for it or raise issues and vote against it. For example, Blairs first defeat in 2005 over his terrorism bill was extensively covered in the media highlighting the influence MP’s have.
    Usually, the government has a majority and can pass a bill easily. However, Backbench MPS have more of an influence because Liberal and Conservative MPs are rebelling 1 in 2 votes- more significantly, they are rebelling on different issues. Perhaps the threat of the whip system is not as prominent. The 2010 government is the most rebellious since 1945.
    Since the government is the most rebellious it is unlikely that David Cameron can use his prime ministerial powers and ‘sack’ them all. His deputy prime minister also, has a high impetus on the ‘sacking’, ‘hiring’ and reshuffling of MPs. To highlight the rebellion and influence of Back bench MPS, David Nattall voted against the whip 54 times. The threat of promotion and loyalty which is potently associate with Conservative ideology is limited, there is less opportunities or chances of receiving promotion. Therefore, the threat of the ‘whip’ has gradually lost its prominence in back bench MPs.
    Backbench MP’s can influence the government through private member bills in which they propose bills. Conservative Peter Bone suggested whips are talent and would be better deployed as ministers. Whips are limited in their influence and he sates they undermine MP’s independence. In an attempt to increase the power of individual MPS peter bone suggested the abolishment of the Whip system in a private member bill. However, the influence of MP’s in private member bills is limited as the majority of them run out of time like Peter Bones. However, to some extent they are successful in influencing the government as a private member bill was successful in 2012- the scrap metal bill. The sanctions on the Backbench Powers are considerably high here, most of them run out of time and therefore, the influence they have with policy can be limited.
    Backbench MPs also have influence through questions to ministers. They can ask ministers questions and more importantly, hold them to account in the house. This can be seen through MP Conor Burns MP (2012) telling Foreign Secretary, William Hague to pressurise Russia over it’s support for Syria’s president. Contrary, MP’s have limited influence as ministers are usually well briefed ans have the support of the Prime Minister.
    Backbench MP’s can also use their influence in Adjournments Debates. This allows MPs to raise an issue and receive a direct response from Ministers. For example, Hazel Bears in 2013, raised the issue of access to post graduate study at Oxford. This highlights that MPs can use there influence to raise common issues. However, this power is limited as Ministers need not act on the issues raised and perhaps these Adjournment debates are simply opportunities for MPS to satisfy their constituencies.
    Furthermore, many MPs have shown influence as they work on parliamentary committees and this oversees the work of the government. They check and report on areas ranging from the work of departments to economic affairs.
    Backbench MP’s on select committees can influence the government through the media. Select committees consist of ordinary backbench MPs. They have the reputation for publishing critical reports and these reports are covered by the media. The hearings with regard to the select committees are broadcasted which influence the government as they make ‘good’ but more importantly cheap television. For example. In April 2005, the education select committee published a critical report on the teaching of reading highlighting that phonic learning was a failure. The government was heavily criticised for the findings of phonics and on the 1st of December 2005, the government announced that phonics would be a core method and would be improved.
    However, the threat of disloyalty and disobeying the party has some impact on the way in which MP’s act. Disloyalty does lead to sanctions. For example, Labour MP Ken Livingstone thrown out his party for ‘rebellious acts’.
    From setting up Cameron’s Coaltion, May 2010- Feb. 2011 there was more rebellions then that of Blairs government from (1997-2001). The total amount of rebellions reach 97 in the first nine months. For example, in Feb. 2011 both conservative and Liberal Democratic MP’s rebelled over plans to sell Britain’s forest to private companies.
    Back bench MPs can also exercise their influence through Early Day Motions. This allows MP’s to publicise an issue. For example, George Campell MP commended rangers and encouraged the SFA to promote “ competitive and Attractive football”. However the influence of MP’s with regard to Early Day Motions is limited. The government need not act and it does not have a huge impact unless some scandal is noted.
    More so, the select committees are highly influential, maybe even more so due to the Coalition. For example, the health select committee criticised the Lansley Reforms heavily. Even though the government must ‘note’ reports the influence is limited as they need not act.
    It is important to note that the Prime Minister needs Back Bench MPs extensively. Voters may like MP’s that are able to voice opinions but they do not like a divided party. Without the support of his/her cabinet the Prime Minister is limited in the amount of actions he can do. Eg. April 2009 Gordon Browns plans to limit the number of Ghurkhas who can settle in Britain was defeated.
    Therefore, even though the Prime Minister can make decisions on his own like for example the 2009 Budget in which Blair and Brown were a ‘two head’ party. The importance of Back bench MPS is extensively obvious.
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    Back Bench essay i just done- its quite rough but has good facts. Doing voting systems now and will post it when im done
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    (Original post by rod11)
    what is everyone studying for decision making in central government 1B, starting to panic ?
    I'm mainly studying backbench MPs and pressure groups!
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    I'm mainly studying backbench MPs and pressure groups!
    thanks, only know pressure groups so hoping it does come up
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    (Original post by Beccabarrow)
    My teacher handed it out in paper but I could try and type it out?
    I have two essays for ams 15/15 and 12/15 for stv if anyone wants them I could email them has anyone got any wealth essays?
    If you could send me one or both of the AMS essays that would be absolutely wonderful! :-)
 
 
 
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