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    peak. keep grinding
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    (Original post by edothero)
    You are absolutely correct, though let me explain to you why some CS grads cannot get jobs.

    The industry needs more innovative, creative CS grads.
    Anyone can code if they put in enough work. It's what they can code that differentiates those people who can get jobs with those who can't

    I've expressed this before in this thread but I'll repeat it.
    (This bit isn't aimed at you or your comment , but for the thread in general)

    Much like Architecture, to get a really good job you need to prove to the employer what you're capable of. This can be done in many different ways, preferably whilst at university.

    You must build a portfolio showing your successes, and even things that haven't really worked. It's the idea that's most important.

    1) Projects: You must ensure that you take part in tons of projects, both group projects and private projects. This is very important because it shows the employer you're good with working in teams to produce a solution an error, or do something that's never been done before. Also it shows what you're capable of in terms of creativity, innovation and of course coding.

    2) Hackathons: This may seem stupid but these events are important for your CV. In Hackathons you have 24 hours (time-frame varies from event to event, host decides, but its usually 24 hours) to create something (topic is decided again by the host) from scratch that could be used in an industry environment. This is key because it shows the employer that you can cope with pressure and that you're both a creative and innovative person, whilst being an excellent problem solver.

    3) Internships: I cannot express how important this is, another key thing employers look for is experience. I would HIGHLY recommend you sort out an internship for your penultimate year. Not only will this ensure you can some industrial experience. But, if you're clever enough, it could be an excellent opportunity to network.
    Also, you may possibly end up with a job offer at the end of the internship. Depends how good you are :P


    All in all, don't expect an amazing job if you have little or no experience outside of university studies
    YOUR DEGREE CLASSIFICATION DOESN'T MATTER AS MUCH AS YOU THINK IT DOES (though obviously try to get minimum 2.1, nothing worse than 2.2 pls xD)

    rant over :woo::woo:
    I wish I could rep this 10000x Legit think we need to sticky this in the CS forum.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I wish I could rep this 10000x Legit think we need to sticky this in the CS forum.

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    I agree. This and a "A GOOD CS COURSE WILL HAVE MATHS. IF YOU DONT LIKE MATHS DONT DO CS" or something like that
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    (Original post by Howard)
    God, you're a bit uppity aren't you? Got the painters in? I started off by saying I wasn't criticizing you! Oh, and don't worry about me - I earn a hell of a lot more that 24k.
    I am aware, but it sounded like you were considering it's the most boring job in the world by most people. I really do enjoy it because it's literally an easy job for me and at least someone has faith in me.
    I know some people on national minimum wage jobs are highly unhappy and they absolutely hate their job because obviously it's not want they want in the first place.
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    (Original post by CarysMoo)
    I know someone with a 2:2 in Performance Studies (of all things) and he just set up his own business (tutoring), which he is doing reasonably well in thus far. Don't give up!
    Considered a Mickey Mouse degree by most this one.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    I am aware, but it sounded like you were considering it's the most boring job in the world by most people. I really do enjoy it because it's literally an easy job for me and at least someone has faith in me.
    I know some people on national minimum wage jobs are highly unhappy and they absolutely hate their job.
    I'm glad you like it. You could be doing a lot worse by the sounds of things. My point was simply to comment on how the value of degrees have eroded to the point where you are doing a job that 25 years ago would have been done by a school leaver with a few CSE's.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I'm glad you like it. You could be doing a lot worse by the sounds of things. My point was simply to comment on how the value of degrees have eroded to the point where you are doing a job that 25 years ago would have been done by a school leaver with a few CSE's.
    I apologise if my previous post did offend you in some way.

    Anyway yes it has I would agree. It doesn't help either when you want to be in a profession that the government are making cutbacks on (I studied Social Care and want to be healthcare assistant)
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Law sucks unless you happen to be in the top 1%. There's a glut of lawyers.

    A top 50 law company doesn't amount to much. They're typically paying solicitors with 3 -5 years experience between 35 and 55k which is a complete joke. A kwikfit fitter can make this sort of cash. You're better off learning how to operate a tower crane.
    He regrets studying law. I am the same and in my final year. What are the alternatives?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I wish I could rep this 10000x Legit think we need to sticky this in the CS forum.

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    Thanks bro xD Someone had to say it, I'm surprised you didn't beat me to it
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    (Original post by MUN123)
    I graduated last month with a 2:2 in Computer science and since then I have been applying for graduate jobs non-stop with a lot of rejections. I then had to sign on JSA, now the Job center are advising me to work for free for 2 weeks in a call center to get "experience" which I've refused because I dislike to be exploited by the company and work for free in a field that does not interest me.

    I explained to the Job centers that I'm interested in IT jobs to which they replied that they would not be paying me benefits so that I could sit and wait for a very specific job. And after applying to loads of minimum wage jobs and getting loads of rejections they want me to work for free in some crappy job to get experience.

    The other day they sent me to a compulsory course which explained about how to use the internet to apply for jobs I thought it was laughable they must be stuck in the 90's. They have no clue on how to deal with graduates
    I know this is a while ago but I feel the need to respond.

    So, you didn't put in enough effort in your degree and now are refusing to take up the sort of experience that would help you get a job.

    You're moping that the job centre won't pay you money endlessly while you wait to get a particular job that you want, an objective towards which you've shown no sign of progress, and you think the best response to employment courses which are designed to help you is scorn.

    I've never heard such self-pity and self-entitlement in so few words. Get a grip.
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Don't be jealous,

    I highly doubt you earned anything close for your first job and maybe even don't now. Yeah it's low but it's my first job. FIRST.

    Plus it's in a lucrative field; programming. Look it up.

    Wasteman.
    Listen I'm not getting into a bragging contest about who earns more and who has most potential. That's the exact point I was trying to make about your pompous comment.

    But it seems it's gone completely over your head.

    But again, thanks for trying to patronise me. Maybe one day I'll understand what programming is, it's like computers or something isn't it...?
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    (Original post by Mega0448)
    Listen I'm not getting into a bragging contest about who earns more and who has most potential. That's the exact point I was trying to make about your pompous comment.

    But it seems it's gone completely over your head.

    But again, thanks for trying to patronise me. Maybe one day I'll understand what programming is, it's like computers or something isn't it...?
    Lol you don't know what programming is? that's ****ing tragic.

    Programming is the basis of the 21st century, without programming you can say goodbye to every single technological advancement of the digital age.

    My comment isn't pompous, and even if it was, who cares, I certainly don't give a ****, haters gonna hatteee
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Lol you don't know what programming is? that's ****ing tragic.

    Programming is the basis of the 21st century, without programming you can say goodbye to every single technological advancement of the digital age.

    My comment isn't pompous, and even if it was, who cares, I certainly don't give a ****, haters gonna hatteee
    LOOOOOL, this is such a **** waving contest lmao

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    Well you did get a 2:2......
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Law sucks unless you happen to be in the top 1%. There's a glut of lawyers.

    A top 50 law company doesn't amount to much. They're typically paying solicitors with 3 -5 years experience between 35 and 55k which is a complete joke. A kwikfit fitter can make this sort of cash. You're better off learning how to operate a tower crane.
    There are absolutely tons of City firms which pay that to trainees. You can expect 50-70k in your first year as a qualified lawyer at most big-ish commercial firms; some of the US firms go up to 100k in the first year. Have a browse through this list: http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/law...efits-compared

    That may not be that much more than a crane operator, but I'm pretty sure the potential is a lot higher.

    You have to be better than most students -- nothing like at the 99th percentile -- but that doesn't just 'happen' either. A lot of it is about motivation and work ethic. That and confidence, which can be developed. It's highly beneficial if you got involved in things other than just your course at university. But that's it.

    It's obviously not a guaranteed, highly paid job, but it's nothing like as bleak as you're painting it, either.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOOOL, this is such a **** waving contest lmao

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    but dis guy aint event got a **** to wave.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    Considered a Mickey Mouse degree by most this one.
    Yep, definitely.

    He can't even remember what his dissertation was on. That's how important it was.

    But, you can't fault the guy's enthusiasm, and I think that's mostly why he's been successful in employment/with this new business.
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    (Original post by CarysMoo)
    Yep, definitely.

    He can't even remember what his dissertation was on. That's how important it was.

    But, you can't fault the guy's enthusiasm, and I think that's mostly why he's been successful in employment/with this new business.
    I agree. I know someone whose actually graduated in this subject and most employers has probably laughed it off because they might consider as a 'fun' course. I mean my ex managers mentioned about these MM subjects and they feel there are no challenges within them.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    There are absolutely tons of City firms which pay that to trainees. You can expect 50-70k in your first year as a qualified lawyer at most big-ish commercial firms; some of the US firms go up to 100k in the first year. Have a browse through this list: http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/law...efits-compared

    That may not be that much more than a crane operator, but I'm pretty sure the potential is a lot higher.

    You have to be better than most students -- nothing like at the 99th percentile -- but that doesn't just 'happen' either. A lot of it is about motivation and work ethic. That and confidence, which can be developed. It's highly beneficial if you got involved in things other than just your course at university. But that's it.

    It's obviously not a guaranteed, highly paid job, but it's nothing like as bleak as you're painting it, either.
    It's a lot bleaker than I paint it if you happen to be in the USA. Very few make it to "Big Law" (maybe 5%) and 90% of those that do get spat out at Associate level after 5 years and end up in Mid Law. So it's probably 10% of 5% that make it to Partner in major US firms.

    Everybody else is doing solo work - putting in 60 hour weeks for a $50k salary. And as for new lawyers they're either doing doc review work for $20 an hour or unpaid internships which isn't a great start to their careers or good way to pay off $150k in non dischargeable debt that many of them carry.

    I mean really, I don't know much about the situation in the UK but what % of newly qualified lawyers start off with a city gig paying 50-70k? 2% 3%? And if you step back a bit, what % of law graduates end up going on to get that gig? Far less than that because many law grads never go on to actually qualify as lawyers.

    So yes, you CAN do well as a lawyer. Some do. But better chance that you'll do well running a lawn care company.
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    (Original post by Silly_Monkey)
    He regrets studying law. I am the same and in my final year. What are the alternatives?
    Buyers remorse with law degrees. I did a law degree with the OU years ago. Big waste of four years of my spare time!!

    Good alternative? Thought about supply chain management, procurement, contract administration?
 
 
 
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