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    (Original post by getback339)
    Does anyone know why you need a minus sign infront of the constant when setting up a diff. equation and its decreasing? thanks
    You technically don't. It's just the constant of integration will become negative, which could be a hindrance later on.
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    Does anyone else own the Texas ti-nspire cx calculator and has used it in exams before? I've borrowed it from a friend and i'm not sure if it's allowed in exams, it isn't on the prohibited list of calculators but yet again it is an absolute beast and has a colour screen. So does anyone know? lol
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    (Original post by Alex:)
    You technically don't. It's just the constant of integration will become negative, which could be a hindrance later on.
    Cool, thanks! , also dealing with natural log addition/subtraction, do you just go by bidmas for which you do first?
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    (Original post by getback339)
    Cool, thanks! , also dealing with natural log addition/subtraction, do you just go by bidmas for which you do first?
    If you mean combining logs, it makes no difference. Take the factor onto the power of the log, then combine by adding/subtracting.

    If you mean where logs come in the order of operations, they come in the 'over' category. Your i or o in BIDMAS or BODMAS should really be F for functions.
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    (Original post by Medboy100)
    Does anyone else own the Texas ti-nspire cx calculator and has used it in exams before? I've borrowed it from a friend and i'm not sure if it's allowed in exams, it isn't on the prohibited list of calculators but yet again it is an absolute beast and has a colour screen. So does anyone know? lol
    You're not allowed to use calculators that can integrate or differentiate or have stored formulae. You can use graphing calculators oddly enough though
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    (Original post by Medboy100)
    Does anyone else own the Texas ti-nspire cx calculator and has used it in exams before? I've borrowed it from a friend and i'm not sure if it's allowed in exams, it isn't on the prohibited list of calculators but yet again it is an absolute beast and has a colour screen. So does anyone know? lol
    Texas Instruments aren't allowed I think.


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    (Original post by bbadonde2)
    You're not allowed to use calculators that can integrate or differentiate or have stored formulae. You can use graphing calculators oddly enough though
    It does have symbolic integration and differentiation as well as stored memory. But i have disabled all of this by putting the calculator into exam mode by plugging it into the computer. I won't be able to change it back without plugging it back into the computer.

    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Texas Instruments aren't allowed I think.
    I know the ti-nspire cx CAS model is prohibited and some of the other models but this particular model wasn't listed. Also i know a neighbouring school where they recommend students to buy this calculator. I just don't know how strict my school is, I think i will have to go in and check with my teachers before the exam. Thanks anyway
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    (Original post by Medboy100)
    It does have symbolic integration and differentiation as well as stored memory. But i have disabled all of this by putting the calculator into exam mode by plugging it into the computer. I won't be able to change it back without plugging it back into the computer.



    I know the ti-nspire cx CAS model is prohibited and some of the other models but this particular model wasn't listed. Also i know a neighbouring school where they recommend students to buy this calculator. I just don't know how strict my school is, I think i will have to go in and check with my teachers before the exam. Thanks anyway
    I wouldn't risk it. Just get the standard Casio


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    (Original post by Medboy100)
    It does have symbolic integration and differentiation as well as stored memory. But i have disabled all of this by putting the calculator into exam mode by plugging it into the computer. I won't be able to change it back without plugging it back into the computer.



    I know the ti-nspire cx CAS model is prohibited and some of the other models but this particular model wasn't listed. Also i know a neighbouring school where they recommend students to buy this calculator. I just don't know how strict my school is, I think i will have to go in and check with my teachers before the exam. Thanks anyway
    Tbh it's all well and good saying that but it's a risk. If you get a clued up invigilator that spots you have a fancy calculator, they may raise questions. You're not allowed those types of calculators in exams regardless if you've disabled functions. It's too much of a risk that's not worth taking.
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    How often do we get asked to draw the arc graphs for both C3 and C4?
    Haven't done any past papers so that's why I'm quite clueless.
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    (Original post by Rkai01)
    How often do we get asked to draw the arc graphs for both C3 and C4?
    Haven't done any past papers so that's why I'm quite clueless.
    Not often. But edexcel love surprising people so I would learn them


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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Not often. But edexcel love surprising people so I would learn them


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    Nah you don't even need to learn them

    Just sub in values!!
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    (Original post by Tow)
    Nah you don't even need to learn them

    Just sub in values!!
    Lol I don't like this method personally. But oh well if that is your method !



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    why does secttant disappear?
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    (Original post by studentwiz)
    why does secttant disappear?
    Reverse chain rule. (You can also see it by substitution)


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    can someone tell me how 3^x-1 when differentiated turns to 3^x-1ln3
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    (Original post by studentwiz)
    why does secttant disappear?
    What paper was this from? So I can do the whole question. Thanks.
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    (Original post by randlemcmurphy)
    What paper was this from? So I can do the whole question. Thanks.
    https://a086a5a2f39bda93734c56a63fab...%20Edexcel.pdf

    7c I was experimenting parametric I know you can just use the cartesian equation
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    (Original post by TopPhysio)
    can someone tell me how 3^x-1 when differentiated turns to 3^x-1ln3
    by using implicit differentiation
    eg. y=2^x
    dy/dx = 2^xln2

    a^x dy/dx=a^xlna


    so y=3^x-1
    dy/dx = 3^x-1ln3
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    (Original post by studentwiz)
    by using implicit differentiation
    eg. y=2^x
    dy/dx = 2^xln2

    a^x dy/dx=a^xlna


    so y=3^x-1
    dy/dx = 3^x-1ln3
    ahh completely forgot about this. thanks
 
 
 
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