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    (Original post by Yua)
    and the MS?
    It's on the same website in another section
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    does anyone have the examiners report for F214 June 2014?
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    (Original post by kattiieee96)
    does anyone have the examiners report for F214 June 2014?
    they're on the OCR website
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    (Original post by phoebc)
    they're on the OCR website
    Oh haha thank you!
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    f215 isn't nice
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    do you guys think it is still possible to get an A* overall in biology with 36/40 in the PSAs?
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    (Original post by phoebc)
    do you guys think it is still possible to get an A* overall in biology with 36/40 in the PSAs?
    Of course fam

    36 is an roughly an a, right?

    36/40 is then 80% of 60 ums which is 48 ums for your isa

    So you need 222 ums (270-48) from f214 and f215 combined to get an a*, providing you get 480/600 for the whole a-level as well

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    (Original post by brother aldi)
    Of course fam

    36 is an roughly an a, right?

    36/40 is then 80% of 60 ums which is 48 ums for your isa

    So you need 222 ums from f214 and f215 combined to get an a*, providing you get 480/600 for the whole a-level as well

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    yeah it is just an A thank god
    just this whole stress of needing 90% in all A2 units confuses me
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    (Original post by phoebc)
    yeah it is just an A thank god
    just this whole stress of needing 90% in all A2 units confuses me
    Yeah, it can be a lil confusing, fam

    But to get the a*, you need 480/600 for the whole a-level and 270/300 for the a2 units. Doesnt matter how you get the 270 from the 3 a2 units, just as long as you reach it, it's all good. So you could get 100% in f214, 90% in f215 and 80% in f216 but still get a*

    :yes:

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    (Original post by brother aldi)
    Yeah, it can be a lil confusing, fam

    But to get the a*, you need 480/600 for the whole a-level and 270/300 for the a2 units. Doesnt matter how you get the 270 from the 3 a2 units, just as long as you reach it, it's all good. So you could get 100% in f214, 90% in f215 and 80% in f216 but still get a*

    :yes:

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    okok ty!
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    can someone explain to me what we need to know on gibberellins and stem elongation?
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    Does anyone have the june 2014 paper for f215 ??? Thank youuu


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    Oh hahaha dw , saw someone just posted it


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    so are these the steps of genome sequencing: BEFORE: 1) PCR used to amplify DNA fragments 2) These DNA fragments undergo electrophoresis for seperation 3) DNA probes used to identify the fragments NOWADAYS: Automated sequencing used, with interrupted PCR to create fragments of different lengths and electrophoresis all in one type of machine
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    do we need to know the different lobes of the cerebrum?
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    (Original post by tewas)
    so are these the steps of genome sequencing: BEFORE: 1) PCR used to amplify DNA fragments 2) These DNA fragments undergo electrophoresis for seperation 3) DNA probes used to identify the fragments NOWADAYS: Automated sequencing used, with interrupted PCR to create fragments of different lengths and electrophoresis all in one type of machine
    Would a DNA probe actually be used in sequencing?
    DNA probe is used to identify a gene correct? If you are sequencing a genome, you don't know what the genes are surely? So how would a DNA probe be used to identify a gene if the genes have never been seen before for example?

    I thought DNA probe was used to identify gene so you know where to use restriction enzymes to extract said gene.

    But I may be wrong I dislike genomes and gene technology a lot.



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    Hey Guys

    I am really struggling with evidence regarding chemiosmosis. Could someone help me with this please?
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    (Original post by tewas)
    so are these the steps of genome sequencing: BEFORE: 1) PCR used to amplify DNA fragments 2) These DNA fragments undergo electrophoresis for seperation 3) DNA probes used to identify the fragments NOWADAYS: Automated sequencing used, with interrupted PCR to create fragments of different lengths and electrophoresis all in one type of machine
    (Original post by Hilton184)
    Would a DNA probe actually be used in sequencing?
    DNA probe is used to identify a gene correct? If you are sequencing a genome, you don't know what the genes are surely? So how would a DNA probe be used to identify a gene if the genes have never been seen before for example?

    I thought DNA probe was used to identify gene so you know where to use restriction enzymes to extract said gene.

    But I may be wrong I dislike genomes and gene technology a lot.



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    Arent probes used to locate a known gene?
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    (Original post by AnnekaChan173)
    Arent probes used to locate a known gene?
    Yeah I think that's right.

    So a gene probe wouldn't be used to sequence a genome? As before sequencing the genome is unknown? So a gene probe would have no use in sequencing correct?


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    (Original post by Hilton184)
    Yeah I think that's right.

    So a gene probe wouldn't be used to sequence a genome? As before sequencing the genome is unknown? So a gene probe would have no use in sequencing correct?


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    Yeah it shouldn't. Probes could attach to anywhere that's complementary, and could also form temp H-bonds with areas that aren't completely complementary, so they wouldn't be all that helpful in sequencing, right? The only time I've really seen anything about probes was locating a gene for genetic engineering
 
 
 
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