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    (Original post by Lúcio)
    Not bad pal

    I got a Pinser from mine and I have two more 10k eggs close to hatching

    Snorlax pls
    Wonder if Charizards come out?
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    (Original post by Fizzel)
    Airstrikes obviously aren't the best method but what exactly would you recommend? Its mass casualties either way and you cannot pretend you would be content with lower but still huge that either. Special teams cannot be deployed in large numbers that is why they are special, large numbers on the scale needed to cover two countries is called in invasion. That will not be perceived well in the Muslim world.

    Invasion = bad, been there
    Airstrikes = bad, civialians
    Nothing = bad, ISIS
    Supporting Assad = bad dicator
    Arming opposition groups to remove Assad = Libya = bad destruction of the state and clear abuses.

    In all seriousness. Which realistic workable plan would leave you think 'well done America, they really did a stellar job!'
    The point is that any form of foreign intervention will not work. America just like pouring petrol on the fire. Have been doing it for decades.
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    (Original post by SA-1)
    Wonder if Charizards come out?
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    (Original post by SA-1)
    Wonder if Charizards come out?
    Got a Snorlax and a Ponyta today
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    (Original post by Rk2k14)
    The point is that any form of foreign intervention will not work. America just like pouring petrol on the fire. Have been doing it for decades.
    So your position is that the best outcome for the people of Syria is that foreign powers should not intervene. You surely are aware the two outcomes from that are either ISIS, and the brutal authoritarian conditions that come with that, or Assad and brutal reprisals and dictatorship. Either way mass casualties in a war off attrition (basically Aleppo across two countries) followed a life which amounts to perpetual slavery (under either ISIS or Assad). That sounds like a good way to go about achieving the worst possible outcome, with the longest possible period of misery in between.
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    (Original post by Fizzel)
    So your position is that the best outcome for the people of Syria is that foreign powers should not intervene. You surely are aware the two outcomes from that are either ISIS, and the brutal authoritarian conditions that come with that, or Assad and brutal reprisals and dictatorship. Either way mass casualties in a war off attrition (basically Aleppo across two countries) followed a life which amounts to perpetual slavery (under either ISIS or Assad). That sounds like a good way to go about achieving the worst possible outcome, with the longest possible period of misery in between.
    Considering the way the foreign powers are intervening it hasn't improved the situation has it?
    It won't work because the way they are intervening is clearly having a detrimental effect on the lives of civilians. If they aren't being killed by ISIS or Assad then they're being blown up US and French airstrikes.

    Foreign intervention being used like it is now will not work (which was my initial point, if it wasn't interpreted that way). Apologies if i was vague in that statement.

    Easy to critique the actions of countries but a solution is a difficult one. Maybe through international organisations can the situation be tackled but its clear an alternative approach needs to be taken because if it carries on like this then there won't be a Syria left to aid.
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    (Original post by Rk2k14)
    Considering the way the foreign powers are intervening it hasn't improved the situation has it?
    It won't work because the way they are intervening is clearly having a detrimental effect on the lives of civilians. If they aren't being killed by ISIS or Assad then they're being blown up US and French airstrikes.
    .
    This is rarely reported on though to be honest, when things like civilian casualties happen you'll also struggle to find the actual effect it has had on deterring ISIS whether that be resisting their push to infiltrate more cities, destroying intel they have thats linked to terror plans it has globally or even simply disrupting their command chain.

    It's probably not the best way to deal with the situation but it seems to be the best out of a bad bunch sadly, there will probably come a time when air strikes will become obsolete though, either if ISIS smarten up and disguise themselves further in the general population or their whole structure crumbles and you have nothing left to actually attack.
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    prime this guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byOw4AYd7-8 vs prime tyson?
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    (Original post by Rk2k14)
    why turkey? Been on the BBC news front page every day since the events started, and its been the top story for a few of those days?
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    (Original post by Fizzel)
    So your critisim of America's foreign policy in this case is that it wasn't quick enough to move to armed intervention in a sovereign state to overthrow the government? That seems slightly out of step with your usual position.
    Yeah it is. I threw in the little "hindsight makes it easier" in a vain attempt to cover it which failed. As you already know, in modern society I am a pacifist, don't think war or military action can achieve anything like a good old sword fight would've. I think the most effective method would've been a quick removal of Assad. You're right though, logistically it wasn't possible.

    [QUOTE=Fizzel;66515336Also there is a shift of responsibility in there with rebel tendencies. You're effectively shifting their responsibly for their tendencies, from them to America as a byproduct of them not acting. Those tendencies are entirely within their own control and provide perfect justification for nothing doing anything until the facts have been established. Lets not forget we didn't hesitate in Libya, and that has turned out well for the Libyan people. Did you hold this view of US action in Libya btw?[/QUOTE]

    Not trying to defend the radicalisation of rebels, just looking for possible reasons (and likely clutching) for why it occurred. What I would say is that the inactivity of the west (basically giving Bashar free reign to bomb and massacre thousands), regardless of whether we right or wrong to hold off, provides an easy narrative for people like Baghdadi to covert masses of disgruntled, uneducated violent thugs to a poisonous ideology like Daesh.

    Libya was always going to be a lose-lose situation for me. A country with deep-rooted tribal controlled territories finally rid of their dictator? There wasn't a solution there that didn't end in mass violence, Gadaffi or no Gadaffi. Let's no act like we don't know why US took action there though. I've avoided answering your question because I don't know the answer. Easy to be swayed in the emotion of it all in wanting Gadaffi dead, but it's a very short term mode of thought.

    Syria provides other issues. A minority of Shia's controlling a Sunni majority country was always a disaster waiting to happen. I think a democratic solution was viable (not now), one that would've required Assad on the back foot and changes overseen by the west to ensure transparency (easier said than done when you look at Egypt).


    [QUOTE=Fizzel;66515336As a side if we are going to be talking about America doing their air campaign better or hints that it is a malicious campaign. We should take a look at other regional powers and see to what level they are able to avoid casualties and see if we can find a real life example of it being done better or absence of malice. Turkey against the Kurds? Russia against the Assad opposition? Saudi in its war in Yemen perhaps? The UK in Afghanistan?[/QUOTE]
    Agree. Which is why my first paragraph came to being.

    Enjoy having balanced and civilised conversations with you. Makes a change from the usual dickwaving on tsr ffs.
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    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    why turkey? Been on the BBC news front page every day since the events started, and its been the top story for a few of those days?
    The coup in Turkey is being widely reported but the terror attacks in Turkey rarely make headline news (or not for long).
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    Would you rather marry rich or marry royalty? So are you a Kate or a Pippa?
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    Marry royalty everytime.
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    allow being royalty tbh, imagine having to go to some of these places in the UK and the world and pretend you enjoy every part of it. selfish af but i dont want to go to schools and give talks and **** and go to these air shows and promote the military especially seeing as its all for the camera tbh.

    being rich and being selective on what i want to do would be ideal, assuming youre just rich and not famous so no paparazzi or general media coverage.
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    Rich.

    None of the media ******** and you're rolling in dollah.
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    (Original post by Kim-Jong-Illest)
    allow being royalty tbh, imagine having to go to some of these places in the UK and the world and pretend you enjoy every part of it. selfish af but i dont want to go to schools and give talks and **** and go to these air shows and promote the military especially seeing as its all for the camera tbh.

    being rich and being selective on what i want to do would be ideal, assuming youre just rich and not famous so no paparazzi or general media coverage.
    Nah Pippa loves being in the papers so it's royalty + famous or rich + famous.
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    Any tips on how to resign from my part time job? I think policy dictates at least a weeks notice, but do I need to write a letter or is my word enough?
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    (Original post by The Wavefunction)
    Any tips on how to resign from my part time job? I think policy dictates at least a weeks notice, but do I need to write a letter or is my word enough?
    When I worked at Primark and was offered a job at the hospital, even though I started like 6 weeks after it was offered to me.. I called Primark and said "I've been offered a full time job and they need me to start tomorrow" and they just did a leaving interview over the phone and that was that :lol:

    Unless you need a reference from them it doesn't really matter. If you do, it does need to be in writing so just write a short resignation letter and sign it.

    Technically because you've signed a contract (if you have) that says that you need to give notice.. You do on paper but they don't have the time and energy to hold you to it. Much easier to recruit another part timer for them
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    (Original post by The Wavefunction)
    Any tips on how to resign from my part time job? I think policy dictates at least a weeks notice, but do I need to write a letter or is my word enough?
    Just tell them verbally and ask if they want it in writing too.

    Will you be doing the week's notice? Usually they're more annoyed if you quit and just say you're not coming back for your next shift.
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    (Original post by SA-1)
    When I worked at Primark and was offered a job at the hospital, even though I started like 6 weeks after it was offered to me.. I called Primark and said "I've been offered a full time job and they need me to start tomorrow" and they just did a leaving interview over the phone and that was that :lol:

    Unless you need a reference from them it doesn't really matter. If you do, it does need to be in writing so just write a short resignation letter and sign it.

    Technically because you've signed a contract (if you have) that says that you need to give notice.. You do on paper but they don't have the time and energy to hold you to it. Much easier to recruit another part timer for them
    (Original post by Zerforax)
    Just tell them verbally and ask if they want it in writing too.

    Will you be doing the week's notice? Usually they're more annoyed if you quit and just say you're not coming back for your next shift.
    I'm currently down for working on Saturdays and Sunday's, with the odd midweek shift every now and again. I think I'd give my notice on the Saturday, and then work the shifts I have up until the following Sunday, which would be 8 days, but I wouldn't be in again until the Saturday after that which would be 2 weeks, so I could technically give 2 weeks notice whilst only working for a week.

    My main concern is that the company is changing the way it operates, so everyone needs to be trained according to that, which goes live in September. I was originally planning on staying up until then, but it would be pointless me staying and being trained only to then quit and them have to hire someone who isn't trained, hence I need to sort this out quickly.
 
 
 
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