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    (Original post by member841230)
    Kinda random perhaps, but I've been pondering whether to try teaching, and the process has involved a lot of forum-surfing! I remember you from a thread a year or two old, where you were thinking seriously about finding another career. If it's not too intrusive, could I ask whether you still feel that way? And if not, what has changed?
    Hi. No problem. Impressive memory. Probably every 1 in 4 posts of mine on this thread were me wanting to leave :awesome: .

    Anyway. I didn't necessarily change my mind - the thought still continually runs laps around my mind! However, the thought has significantly dulled down since my second placement. I hated first placement and I have no doubts that if that school was my second (longer) placement, I'd not have finished the course. It is amazing the effect that a good placement school and mentor can have on your confidence and enjoyment. I also made a lot of growth on my second placement and it made me believe that I am actually good at teaching. Lets face it, everyone enjoys things that they are good at and have confidence in.

    However, to put a downer on things, I must say that the number one reason as to why I haven't left teaching is a lack of alternative for me. I do not have a useful degree so the alternative careers are not clear cut. I do plan to move into a pastoral role eventually though. My current job is half teaching half pastoral so I'll be well qualified to move over to pastoral if something comes up hopefully. College starts next week and I can't wait to be a personal tutor but I'm dreading the actual lessons. That is a sign for me. I have found that I have a genuine want to work in education and help students, just not necessarily by teaching. I have lacked confidence in my subject knowledge and what I'm actually qualified to teach, which can leave me feeling a bit aimless when it comes to delivering a subject. Don't underestimate how important it is to have a passion for the subject you are teaching!

    Sorry if I ranted. If you want any advice just ask.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Hi. No problem. Impressive memory. Probably every 1 in 4 posts of mine on this thread were me wanting to leave :awesome: .

    Anyway. I didn't necessarily change my mind - the thought still continually runs laps around my mind! However, the thought has significantly dulled down since my second placement. I hated first placement and I have no doubts that if that school was my second (longer) placement, I'd not have finished the course. It is amazing the effect that a good placement school and mentor can have on your confidence and enjoyment. I also made a lot of growth on my second placement and it made me believe that I am actually good at teaching. Lets face it, everyone enjoys things that they are good at and have confidence in.

    However, to put a downer on things, I must say that the number one reason as to why I haven't left teaching is a lack of alternative for me. I do not have a useful degree so the alternative careers are not clear cut. I do plan to move into a pastoral role eventually though. My current job is half teaching half pastoral so I'll be well qualified to move over to pastoral if something comes up hopefully. College starts next week and I can't wait to be a personal tutor but I'm dreading the actual lessons. That is a sign for me. I have found that I have a genuine want to work in education and help students, just not necessarily by teaching. I have lacked confidence in my subject knowledge and what I'm actually qualified to teach, which can leave me feeling a bit aimless when it comes to delivering a subject. Don't underestimate how important it is to have a passion for the subject you are teaching!

    Sorry if I ranted. If you want any advice just ask.
    Thanks - really helpful!
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    That's normal. I was thinking about Wakes Weeks and places like Wigan and Oldham, which used to have that pattern of holidays. Probably don't these days. I go back a long way...
    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I'm in Lancashire and we start back on the 3rd September. That's normal right? I never considered it not to be!

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    I'm in Lancashire and I go back on the 8th! We got a lovely 7 week holiday this year

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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    I'm in Lancashire and I go back on the 8th! We got a lovely 7 week holiday this year

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    Not jealous at all...

    I've been in from the 17th August as they have two week staff training (for all staff not just nqts). I'm sure that's not typical.

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    Same time last year I was so nervous about starting the PGCE, now I am about to start my NQT year. A lot has happened In one year.

    For all those who are starting your PGCE in September, make sure you have a restful summer holiday(what's left of it anyway). Try and not worry about the course. I didn't do any reading before and am glad I did not! Honestly,you will be taught everything from scratch once you start the course.

    Before I started, I thought the course would be notoriously difficult as I've heard it so many times. Now I've experienced it myself and I want to offer my 2 cents on it. You will be occupied with tasks from the minute you step into uni on your first day until the day you finish(get used to having to add more items on your growing to-list) , you're being trained to become a teacher, so expect the course to be busy and full on.

    You will probably cry at least once during the course(more than once in my case haha) .There were moments in this course where I was totally stressed(see earlier posts) and was completely out of my depth. It was a challenging year in which ultimately boils down to on how organised you are. But do remember you are not alone, I was lucky to have such supportive PGCE-ers in my course and colleagues in school. Also, I can't thank this thread enough( thank you everybody, especially @Carnationlilyrose for being such a hero to us all).

    Overall, during the PGCE you experience plenty of highs and lows, make sure you constantly reflect on those experience and learn from those.Also, try and take on board the teaching feedback given by your tutors and mentors(as well as classroom teachers observing you). I know it's easier said than done, some feedback given to me were pretty hard to swallow. But,If you can take feedback on board and be able to implement it, then you will go very far.

    The course was really enjoyable, you will meet interesting people from all walks of life. It was such a great experience and I've learnt so much about myself.

    I am currently preparing myself for the NQT Year and the new challenges I will encounter. I am kind of nervous(and tad bit scared),but I know that the PGCE year has given me all the confidence in the world to take on this new challenge.

    Good luck. It will be all worth it in the end.

    Sorry the the long post ;p
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    I guess i count as this now, I've registered and start in 2 weeks... Exciting.
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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Also, I can't thank this thread enough( thank you everybody, especially @Carnationlilyrose for being such a hero to us all)
    Aw, sweetheart! Thank you! Now, go out and be great and be happy.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Aw, sweetheart! Thank you! Now, go out and be great and be happy.
    I don't think you realise how much you've helped people on here. We all really appreciate it. :hugs:
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I don't think you realise how much you've helped people on here. We all really appreciate it. :hugs:
    That's such a lovely thing to hear! Thank you, too!
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    Hi all,
    I guess I can finally call myself a current student - due to start on Monday 7th

    It's been a rocky road even getting to this point (I was due to start my PGCE last year but had to defer due to a bereavement) and I've been following the thread for a good couple of years, but I'm so exited to be starting soon, no matter the tears and trials to come!

    I think I've gone overboard with buying new clothes and stationary ... Still, better to be overstocked!
    Good luck to all the new NQTs from the thread this year
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    (Original post by magic_box)
    Hi all,
    I guess I can finally call myself a current student - due to start on Monday 7th

    It's been a rocky road even getting to this point (I was due to start my PGCE last year but had to defer due to a bereavement) and I've been following the thread for a good couple of years, but I'm so exited to be starting soon, no matter the tears and trials to come!

    I think I've gone overboard with buying new clothes and stationary ... Still, better to be overstocked!
    Good luck to all the new NQTs from the thread this year
    Welcome! I can promise you you will find support here.
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    Well, I'm up and running! First few lessons done. Started with a year 7 class, so of course we were as nervous as each other, but luckily I can pretend not to be!

    I was unsure about the idea of teaching from the first day (because I'm on Schools Direct in a school that believes in getting straight into teaching) before I've had any real input on the training side. But in reality, there was a lot of support. Lesson plans were checked thoroughly by my mentor, lots of advice given and discrete encouragement during the lessons. Because I'm a mature starter, I don't think the yr 7's had any idea I was a trainee.....though the year 8's were more canny about what the situation was, I think! Anyhow, in both cases the kids were great and I enjoyed my first experiences.

    So I've got through the first-night nerves of doing my first lessons, and I now know the mountain of learning and development I need to do to become an effective teacher. That does mean that when the Uni stuff starts shortly, I will already have some experience to relate back to.

    Of course, the reality also now kicks in that I have to do it all again, from next Tuesday!

    Good luck to everyone who is starting next week
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    (Original post by neilcn)
    Well, I'm up and running! First few lessons done. Started with a year 7 class, so of course we were as nervous as each other, but luckily I can pretend not to be!

    I was unsure about the idea of teaching from the first day (because I'm on Schools Direct in a school that believes in getting straight into teaching) before I've had any real input on the training side. But in reality, there was a lot of support. Lesson plans were checked thoroughly by my mentor, lots of advice given and discrete encouragement during the lessons. Because I'm a mature starter, I don't think the yr 7's had any idea I was a trainee.....though the year 8's were more canny about what the situation was, I think! Anyhow, in both cases the kids were great and I enjoyed my first experiences.

    So I've got through the first-night nerves of doing my first lessons, and I now know the mountain of learning and development I need to do to become an effective teacher. That does mean that when the Uni stuff starts shortly, I will already have some experience to relate back to.

    Of course, the reality also now kicks in that I have to do it all again, from next Tuesday!

    Good luck to everyone who is starting next week

    Fantastic, well done
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    (Original post by neilcn)
    Well, I'm up and running!
    ...
    Good luck to everyone who is starting next week
    Congratulations! Wow, I didn't realise schools direct meant teaching from the very first week!

    I'm starting to get nervous about my week long placement. I'm going back to my old junior school, and I kind of wish I wasn't now just because it'll be strange.

    One of my actual teachers is still there and I feel they might think it's nice to put me in her class. I was terrified of her as a kid, so it'll be weird either way- either to find out I'm still intimidated by her (haha) or find out she's really nice.

    And on an "even sillier concerns" front, the only time I could get my hair coloured is the Monday night so I'll start my placement with mousey hair and come back the second day with red (auburn, not Ronald mcdonald). God, what if the pupils bully me for being a ginger...?! Ha. :mmm:
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    When people were looking at universities to study a PGCE at what criteria were you looking at to help you pick?
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    When people were looking at universities to study a PGCE at what criteria were you looking at to help you pick?
    Atmosphere, attitude to teaching and learning, impression I got from open events, structure of the course, testimonials.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    When people were looking at universities to study a PGCE at what criteria were you looking at to help you pick?
    I just picked a city I really wanted to live and work in once I'm qualified, because obviously it gives you a chance to get to know an area and get an idea of schools etc. I didn't really want to do a PGCE and then move again for NQT. I don't really understand people who talk about going to certain universities for the 'name' because it's fairly irrelevant with teacher training. Then as the OP said you get a feel for the place from the way they interview you, admissions etc and can decide if that suits you.


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    (Original post by laura.a.c265)
    I just picked a city I really wanted to live and work in once I'm qualified, because obviously it gives you a chance to get to know an area and get an idea of schools etc. I didn't really want to do a PGCE and then move again for NQT. I don't really understand people who talk about going to certain universities for the 'name' because it's fairly irrelevant with teacher training. Then as the OP said you get a feel for the place from the way they interview you, admissions etc and can decide if that suits you.


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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Atmosphere, attitude to teaching and learning, impression I got from open events, structure of the course, testimonials.

    Xxx

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    Thanks guys, one of my main reasons was I like the collegiate system we use in Durham. Seems most of my shortlist are similar to Durham (Old, has collegiate system, traditional). Having spent 4 years at Durham and lived in a small village I dont think a big city university i.e Manchester would suit me. I guess this comes down to atmosphere and attitude with me not really wanting to go to a vastly different university.
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    When people were looking at universities to study a PGCE at what criteria were you looking at to help you pick?
    Kind of the only thing I looked at was location because I knew I was living at home for my PGCE and that narrowed it down to two unis really.

    Name doesn't matter at all for a PGCE, so I didn't take that into account.
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    Hi all!

    For anyone who's interested, I'm writing a blog over the course of the year where I will be talking about my experiences as a School Direct trainee in a secondary school teaching Modern Languages (although it should apply to most trainee teachers).

    I really hope this doesn't come across as a cheap advertisement, it's just in case any current or prospective PGCE students want an outlook on other people's experiences as it can be quite a daunting and pretty confusing thing to take on.

    https://myschooldirectpgceexperience.wordpress.com/

    Best of luck to everyone with your teaching.
 
 
 
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