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    (Original post by TheFuture001)
    Hey I was wondering whether my solution makes sense to Q1 H on the second specimen paper http://www.mathshelper.co.uk/Oxford%...20Test%202.pdf

    What I basically did was bring the quadratic from the right to the LHS, and allowed c = 2 + (x^2 + 1)^10, which I then used the discriminant on. I ended up with -4 -4(x^2 + 1)^10 < 0, thus there are no real solutions. Wanted to know whether it was mathematically correct to do this, claiming the term with the x and power 10 to be part of the constant.
    the left part is more than 1, the right part is less than 0, so there is no solution
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    (Original post by yxcai)
    the left part is more than 1, the right part is less than 0, so there is no solution
    I know that, I do have the solutions. But I did it a different way and arrived at the same conclusion, so was wondering whether mathematically what I did makes sense.
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    on the 2012 paper on question 4


    they get the area of the sector. i worked out the radius fine. but then to get the angle theta, i didnt get what they got. i used cosine rule on the triangle ACB. with two sides being the radius,sqrt(7/4) and the side opposite the angle being 2*sqrt(3/2), 2x as its the distance from the two points A and B which are equidistant from the y-axis.

    why does this not work. and what has the solution done, as i dont understand what method they employed when they did it,
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    (Original post by IceKidd)
    on the 2012 paper on question 4


    they get the area of the sector. i worked out the radius fine. but then to get the angle theta, i didnt get what they got. i used cosine rule on the triangle ACB. with two sides being the radius,sqrt(7/4) and the side opposite the angle being 2*sqrt(3/2), 2x as its the distance from the two points A and B which are equidistant from the y-axis.

    why does this not work. and what has the solution done, as i dont understand what method they employed when they did it,
    Hm, I'm not sure why it doesn't work your way but I made a triangle from A to C to the perpendicular of this. So basically (0,2) to (sqrt(3/2),3/2) and found out tan of theta/2 from that, which came out out to be sqrt 6, which when you draw another triangle out (I like triangles), you get to solve as theta/2 = arccos(1/sqrt(7))
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    Guys, relax a bit. Take a TSA paper for fun, that worked pretty well for me.
    Best of luck for the test, everyone.
    I might not be online here for a while. Loads of chemistry to study.
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    Does anybody know if tasks like in question 2011/5 (v) require an explanation? I am always a bit unsure of how much writing is actually required (especially since 6 credits are awarded for this mentioned question) :/
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    (Original post by souktik)
    Guys, relax a bit. Take a TSA paper for fun, that worked pretty well for me.
    Best of luck for the test, everyone.
    I might not be online here for a while. Loads of chemistry to study.
    Lol on half those questions every answer seems right to me!
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    (Original post by IceKidd)
    Lol on half those questions every answer seems right to me!
    I know, right!
    I got just 41/50 raw, and they scaled my score to 70.5. Are you familiar with TSA Oxford? If you are, can you tell me how 70.5 is for a first timer? I'm curious.
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    (Original post by souktik)
    I know, right!
    I got just 41/50 raw, and they scaled my score to 70.5. Are you familiar with TSA Oxford? If you are, can you tell me how 70.5 is for a first timer? I'm curious.
    no idea lol. my friends sitting it and he tends to get high 40s so i guess 41s pretty good for a first timer....though i think prep is more likely to increase ur score in MAT than that(and i dont think MAT prep does much, once youve sen the format of the paper)
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    Guys, is the 2011 paper ridiculously easy, or have I actually improved? I just scored 72/100 and I don't know if I should be pleased or not...
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    (Original post by Mike_Ross)
    Guys, is the 2011 paper ridiculously easy, or have I actually improved? I just scored 72/100 and I don't know if I should be pleased or not...
    its fairly standard for the later years. thats about average offer holder so well done
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    (Original post by IceKidd)
    its fairly standard for the later years. thats about average offer holder so well done
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    (Original post by IceKidd)
    no idea lol. my friends sitting it and he tends to get high 40s so i guess 41s pretty good for a first timer....though i think prep is more likely to increase ur score in MAT than that(and i dont think MAT prep does much, once youve sen the format of the paper)
    Ooh, I found the explanation of results.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Explanation of TSA Oxford Results
    Total raw scores on Section 1 of the TSA Oxford are converted to scores on a scale which runs roughly from 0 to 100, but which varies to take into account the overall difficulty of the questions included in a test. The use of this scale allows the scores of candidates who have taken different versions of the test to be directly compared. Extreme scores are expected to be comparatively rare. The scale has been designed so that typical applicants to the most highly selective undergraduate university courses in the UK (who are by definition academically very able) will score around 60. The best applicants will score more highly, but 70 represents a comparatively high score and only a few very exceptional applicants will achieve scores higher than 80. A score of 0 could be attributable to the candidate not being matched as an Oxford University applicant.

    Yay! I feel good about a test that I'll never take!
    P.S. You seem to have a friend as brilliant as yourself.
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    (Original post by souktik)
    Ooh, I found the explanation of results.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Explanation of TSA Oxford Results
    Total raw scores on Section 1 of the TSA Oxford are converted to scores on a scale which runs roughly from 0 to 100, but which varies to take into account the overall difficulty of the questions included in a test. The use of this scale allows the scores of candidates who have taken different versions of the test to be directly compared. Extreme scores are expected to be comparatively rare. The scale has been designed so that typical applicants to the most highly selective undergraduate university courses in the UK (who are by definition academically very able) will score around 60. The best applicants will score more highly, but 70 represents a comparatively high score and only a few very exceptional applicants will achieve scores higher than 80. A score of 0 could be attributable to the candidate not being matched as an Oxford University applicant.

    Yay! I feel good about a test that I'll never take!
    P.S. You seem to have a friend as brilliant as yourself.
    well if he didnt get into oxford, i cant think of anyone that can. he works 24/7
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    (Original post by IceKidd)
    well if he didnt get into oxford, i cant think of anyone that can. he works 24/7
    And I blabber on random forums till 4 am when I have 1400 pages of chem to study in 4 days. Gosh, I hate people with a good work ethic!
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    (Original post by TheGoldenRatio)
    Attachment 250795

    can someone explain the largest value parts please??
    I have a question regarding this problem too... can someone explain to me why is Q = 1/root(5) (2, 1)? Thanks!
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    (Original post by Yezi_L)
    I am also feeling quite worried :/ I didn't start much earlier either and the fact that I am studying something other than the A-levels doesn't seem to help much...

    I guess the only thing that we can do right now is to practice a bit more and try our best on that day
    Hello there! Actually I'm studying something other than the British A-levels too! Yep! Let's practise more! Guess I need a bit of luck too
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    (Original post by Mike_Ross)
    Guys, is the 2011 paper ridiculously easy, or have I actually improved? I just scored 72/100 and I don't know if I should be pleased or not...
    I got a good mark on that paper too - 80/100
    But I just finished the 2012 paper and I got 63/100... yet the average scores of the candidates don't fluctuate that much? I guess the problem is there are only four long questions, if I get a "good question" then I will do well, if I don't then I'm done...
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    Sorry for posting so many posts in a row. 2010 is such a difficult paper! Even after reading the solution, I don't understand this question:

    2010 Question 3
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    ii) I don't understand the graph... Are the extra value of x-intercepts not required?
    iii) Why does the line pass through the origin and is tangential to the second hump above the y-axis and tangential in the third quadrant?
    iv) Why is the line y = c tangential with the second positive hump of the y = sin x/x graph??
    v) Maybe if I should understand part ii I'll understand it?

    Thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by MathGirl)
    Sorry for posting so many posts in a row. 2010 is such a difficult paper! Even after reading the solution, I don't understand this question:

    2010 Question 3
    Name:  NX6PQjV.png
Views: 141
Size:  40.2 KB
    ii) I don't understand the graph... Are the extra value of x-intercepts not required?
    iii) Why does the line pass through the origin and is tangential to the second hump above the y-axis and tangential in the third quadrant?
    iv) Why is the line y = c tangential with the second positive hump of the y = sin x/x graph??
    v) Maybe if I should understand part ii I'll understand it?

    Thanks in advance!
    You seem to have started indexing your problems from ii, lol, so I'll do the same.
    ii) It's an incomplete graph, clearly. It only deals with the interval [-3pi,3pi] and the rest of it hasn't been drawn as it is unnecessary. Once you go through the entire solution, I think you'll understand why.
    iii) The line y=cx must pass through the origin because the origin's coordinates (0,0) satisfy the equation. That's because 0=c.0. So the origin is one of the solutions. Now note that both y=sinx and y=cx are odd functions, where plugging in -x instead of x gives -y instead of y. Therefore, if (a,b) is a solution, and it lies in the first quadrant, (-a,-b), the corresponding point in the third quadrant, is also a solution. Therefore, out of the five solutions, one is the origin, and two each are in the first and third quadrants. Now, the line passes through the origin and it must cut the first positive hump once in the first quadrant. That leaves us with one more intersection point in the first quadrant. But if the line cuts the second positive hump, it will do so TWICE, unless IT'S TANGENTIAL to the hump. And then, of course, note the symmetry between the first and third quadrants again so see why it's tangential to the second negative hump of the third quadrant as well.
    iv) If x is a common solution to y=cx and y=sinx, then cx=sinx or c=sinx/x. Now we know that there are just two positive solutions to this. One cuts the positive hump once, what about the second hump? Use logic similar to part iii.
    v) I don't understand, which part ii are you talking about?

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