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    *Possibly


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    (Original post by cem101)
    My GCSE's were a bit lacklustre as I wasn't serious about my life back then, and I carried that into AS as well oh well can't dwell... onwards and upwards.
    To be fair, I didn't take GCSEs or AS (at the beginning) that seriously either. Still, you did well to end up with A*AB
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    What job, which company and how can you get a grad offer before you have even started your degree lol Also what are you studying and where
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    Anything above 25k. I'm happy.

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    at my peak 50k+
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    Around 20k for start. I'd start for less if it got me to a job paying 20k after some month, weeks.

    Further down the line I'd be looking to starting my own business instead of grinding my way up the career ladder.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    To be fair, I didn't take GCSEs or AS (at the beginning) that seriously either. Still, you did well to end up with A*AB
    yeah... my B makes me sad though (not to sound arrogant)
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    Hey everyone,

    Money isn't the be all and end all I used to think it was. I used to want to earn 50k+ but I truly don't mind anymore. So long as I earn between 20k-30k I know I can live, be happy and have a fulfilling life. It's not all about the wonga, it's about your life quality!!

    :-)
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Lonely? My life IS lonely, right now. And I'm trying to get myself OUT of this disassociation I've had with all of London. I like the idea of succeeding academically and doing stuff. And I know what to do even if I fail academically and don't become some high-flyer. Sell my house, flip it/make a couple of £k profit, keep going till I can invest more. Sell all my possessions if the transportation costs become too much. Develop my current coding skills. Be positive.

    If I fail, I will not reproduce. Give max pleasure for myself, and wither away and die. I'll just cycle about, go to the gym. Do nothing. Die.

    **** such thoughts. I've got stretch my brain now. I have a deep desire to actually have people think I am a capable being too. Not wise, but bright. I want to walk down the street with a confidence, knowing I achieved A*AA+ and am off to an elite uni. It's a lack of pride and belief in myself atm that drives me...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Genuine question: are you autistic?

    The way you view relationships, friends and life is very far removed from normal. You also seem to have highly obsessive thought patterns - a great majority of the posts I've seen from you are the same sentiments repeated over and over again.

    You come across as either autistic, extremely depressed, or both. If it's the latter, seek treatment asap - your aims will only be harder to achieve if you let your depression go untreated. Seriously: depression is an illness just like any other disease, and usually responds very well to modern day drugs. If it's the former, then sorry to say but banking is not the career for you.
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    (Original post by ClickItBack)
    Genuine question: are you autistic?

    The way you view relationships, friends and life is very far removed from normal. You also seem to have highly obsessive thought patterns - a great majority of the posts I've seen from you are the same sentiments repeated over and over again.

    You come across as either autistic, extremely depressed, or both. If it's the latter, seek treatment asap - your aims will only be harder to achieve if you let your depression go untreated. Seriously: depression is an illness just like any other disease, and usually responds very well to modern day drugs. If it's the former, then sorry to say but banking is not the career for you.
    +1

    I've mentioned to him already that he should get off TSR, I've noticed his posts getting more and more worrying, but I think given the kind of people (and discussions) that are common on TSR his obsessions have become significantly worse (and seriously detracting from time he'd be better off spending on revising/studying, or even on anything else really).
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    No idea what I'm going to do after uni yet but according to the internet the average maths/physics graduate has a starting salary of 23K, there's a lot of places to go with that degree choice though so IDK what I'll actually end up getting.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    +1

    I've mentioned to him already that he should get off TSR, I've noticed his posts getting more and more worrying, but I think given the kind of people (and discussions) that are common on TSR his obsessions have become significantly worse (and seriously detracting from time he'd be better off spending on revising/studying, or even on anything else really).
    Yeah, for people susceptible to obsession or depression stemming from comparing yourself to others, TSR is only likely to exacerbate those issues. But I myself and numerous others have told him already to stop obsessing and to try and rectify his view of relationships and self worth, but he keeps up with the same stuff. Which is why I thought he may be on the autistic spectrum, or depressed. Or a masterful troll .
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    (Original post by ClickItBack)
    Yeah, for people susceptible to obsession or depression stemming from comparing yourself to others, TSR is only likely to exacerbate those issues. But I myself and numerous others have told him already to stop obsessing and to try and rectify his view of relationships and self worth, but he keeps up with the same stuff. Which is why I thought he may be on the autistic spectrum, or depressed. Or a masterful troll .
    I can relate to him in a very mild aspect (in regards to wanting to prove to people you're capable etc.) and the sad thing is getting top A-Level grades and into an 'elite' university didn't change any of it one bit for me (and, if anything, once you get there those kind of confidences vanish anyway among the kind of calibre student at a top university, where you just start comparing yourself to those on your course). I can't even begin to imagine how someone feeling like that at AS/A2 would feel if they went to an 'elite' university.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I can relate to him in a very mild aspect (in regards to wanting to prove to people you're capable etc.) and the sad thing is getting top A-Level grades and into an 'elite' university didn't change any of it one bit for me (and, if anything, once you get there those kind of confidences vanish anyway among the kind of calibre student at a top university, where you just start comparing yourself to those on your course). I can't even begin to imagine how someone feeling like that at AS/A2 would feel if they went to an 'elite' university.
    Well fair enough, many people and particularly those on TSR want to be high achievers and prove themselves. However not many take it to the obsessive levels that he does. That's beyond the point of normality and healthiness, in my opinion.

    And I agree totally about the way you feel once you get to university. I, and most people I knew at Cambridge, felt like morons most of the time we were there. It was quite startling, in fact, when I actually got to experience the real world again in my summer internship - even though it was a competitive programme and almost all of the other interns were from top unis, I actually felt like the smart one again.

    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Okay... It's very hard for me to express this in as believable a way as could be possible, in words, but I am sane, and certainly not autistic. Far from it, actually. Most of my friends consider me to have a good to high EQ (literally, they all like, listen and talk to me, and one has literally mentioned this as an opinion of theirs). You are right, however, that I am moderately depressed of a few things. Anyway, I'm getting more positive, confident and optimistic as I study more these days. Also, I've been 'networking' (if you want to call it that) with some pretty directly connected/wealthy people. I've developed better friendships with some.

    I'm actually going to pursue deleting this TSR account soon. I'll put out my strangers' email before I go lol (I'm just open-minded, you never know, someone may want to contact me).

    I understand autism would be linked to being incredibly stubborn about things... And, well, I have, unfortunately; and I cringe very badly at most of the things I've now said on TSR... But no, I can categorically say I've never even had the suggestion of being autistic. I'm very far from it. I'm articulate, and have slightly twisted views. That's all.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Fair enough, I believe you. I asked not to insult you but out of a desire to help. You do seem to have an over-obsessive mindset though. Just dial it down a touch is my advice - the level you're at now is probably an impediment to achieving what you want.
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    (Original post by ClickItBack)
    Well fair enough, many people and particularly those on TSR want to be high achievers and prove themselves. However not many take it to the obsessive levels that he does. That's beyond the point of normality and healthiness, in my opinion.

    And I agree totally about the way you feel once you get to university. I, and most people I knew at Cambridge, felt like morons most of the time we were there. It was quite startling, in fact, when I actually got to experience the real world again in my summer internship - even though it was a competitive programme and almost all of the other interns were from top unis, I actually felt like the smart one again.



    Fair enough, I believe you. I asked not to insult you but out of a desire to help. You do seem to have an over-obsessive mindset though. Just dial it down a touch is my advice - the level you're at now is probably an impediment to achieving what you want.
    I agree that the point it has got to doesn't seem to be too healthy.

    That might half explain why I'm enjoying my current summer internship at the university :lol: (even though I'm working with a Cambridge grad and my boss went to Yale). Did that feeling carry on over from the summer internship to when you worked as a trader after graduating?
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I agree that the point it has got to doesn't seem to be too healthy.

    That might half explain why I'm enjoying my current summer internship at the university :lol: (even though I'm working with a Cambridge grad and my boss went to Yale). Did that feeling carry on over from the summer internship to when you worked as a trader after graduating?
    Yes, but to a smaller extent. Grads are generally sharper than interns because (at least in my day) 50% of interns didn't get an offer. Also I'm only comparing to other interns/grads here - most VP or MD-level traders (though by no means all) are sharper than grads (as you would expect). And of course they'll know seemingly infinitely more than you about markets when you're new.

    Most of them are also very well qualified, and you'll certainly have a fair bit of Oxbridge representation, but you don't often get the ridiculously smart ones on desks. You know, the ones who correct the PhD students in tutorials/supervisions. The ones attending 3rd year lectures in 1st year. I think they prefer to go into research, and thank goodness for that .
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    (Original post by compliance1)
    I'm 10 months out of University (23) and earning £95,000 working as a Compliance Officer in an Investment Bank - have a law degree and worked seriously hard getting jobs during my degree.
    Having audited payroll for investment banks in my younger days, I find it extremely unlikely that you would be earning this much in a compliance role so soon after graduating. Your later comment that compliance is full of old people is also indicative to me that you either don't work in compliance or work for a very small operation because it's simply not an accurate observation of most compliance departments (have you ever tried networking with compliance professionals from other firms?). The only ways you could conceivably earn this much is 1) it's a small firm and you're personally connected to the owners or senior management (i.e. nepotism); 2) you've lied about your experience or 3) you work in an overseas jurisdiction and are quoting your $ earnings in £s.

    When I used to audit payroll back in 2006, the head of compliance typically earned around the £60k mark. That's just under £80k now taking inflation into account. Also, there's a bit of a premium on compliance professionals at the moment so you can probably increase that amount by 25% to about £100k. That's roughly what a Head of Compliance will earn. In larger organisations, MDs might hit £150k and get good bonuses and will earn a lot more.

    An entry level compliance grad can expect a little over £30k in London although it is not normal to start your career in compliance. Normally you get experience in the field first, and then transition to compliance (those that go direct tend to spend their early careers on the broader, generalist stuff like compliance with the code of conduct).

    I am a compliance professional myself and the little of your background you have mentioned is unremarkable. A law degree is vaguely useful, although compliance is not a legal career. It's far more important to develop product knowledge and the workings of the regulator than the standard fare of a law degree to be successful. Besides, if you have a legal query, you have to go to a lawyer anyway. An LLB doesn't qualify you to give legal advice.

    I'm firmly middle management in my career and my outside of London salary is £50k. In London it would be more like £60k because of commuting and cost of living allowances. I hope to eventually aspire to a head of compliance level salary, although not the mega bucks of a big firm (the extra cash would no doubt come at a cost to my time and general health!).
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    According to statistics the majority of salaries being quoted here lie somewhere near the top 10%. So either 9 out of 10 are lying or are just overly ambitious and will never reach their intended salary, OR this thread has attracted only egotistical big shots who love to talk about their salaries. I'm imagining in the majority of cases it's the first.

    Personally I've got an offer of 27K as a starting graduate up north, however my final year is just beginning so I'm still applying around for graduate schemes. That might see that figure rise by 3-8k depending on if I move down south. I'd be very happy if I got above 50K in my 20s (I'm 21 now), not to say I will or I won't. A more short term target would be to break 40K before I'm 25.
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    (Original post by Matty.W)
    According to statistics the majority of salaries being quoted here lie somewhere near the top 10%. So either 9 out of 10 are lying or are just overly ambitious and will never reach their intended salary, OR this thread has attracted only egotistical big shots who love to talk about their salaries. I'm imagining in the majority of cases it's the first.

    Personally I've got an offer of 27K as a starting graduate up north, however my final year is just beginning so I'm still applying around for graduate schemes. That might see that figure rise by 3-8k depending on if I move down south. I'd be very happy if I got above 50K in my 20s (I'm 21 now), not to say I will or I won't. A more short term target would be to break 40K before I'm 25.
    The population on TSR is not representative of the population though, it tends to attract people interested in degrees and professional qualifications. Combined, this group makes up 50% of the population. This is further reduced because a lot of people aren't interested enough to discuss salaries. Low earners are going to be underrepresented or not represented at all here.

    I would estimate with these variances that about 3 in 10 are lying, and one of them is obviously Compliance1.
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    (Original post by AW1983)
    Having audited payroll for investment banks in my younger days, I find it extremely unlikely that you would be earning this much in a compliance role so soon after graduating. Your later comment that compliance is full of old people is also indicative to me that you either don't work in compliance or work for a very small operation because it's simply not an accurate observation of most compliance departments (have you ever tried networking with compliance professionals from other firms?). The only ways you could conceivably earn this much is 1) it's a small firm and you're personally connected to the owners or senior management (i.e. nepotism); 2) you've lied about your experience or 3) you work in an overseas jurisdiction and are quoting your $ earnings in £s.

    When I used to audit payroll back in 2006, the head of compliance typically earned around the £60k mark. That's just under £80k now taking inflation into account. Also, there's a bit of a premium on compliance professionals at the moment so you can probably increase that amount by 25% to about £100k. That's roughly what a Head of Compliance will earn. In larger organisations, MDs might hit £150k and get good bonuses and will earn a lot more.

    An entry level compliance grad can expect a little over £30k in London although it is not normal to start your career in compliance. Normally you get experience in the field first, and then transition to compliance (those that go direct tend to spend their early careers on the broader, generalist stuff like compliance with the code of conduct).

    I am a compliance professional myself and the little of your background you have mentioned is unremarkable. A law degree is vaguely useful, although compliance is not a legal career. It's far more important to develop product knowledge and the workings of the regulator than the standard fare of a law degree to be successful. Besides, if you have a legal query, you have to go to a lawyer anyway. An LLB doesn't qualify you to give legal advice.

    I'm firmly middle management in my career and my outside of London salary is £50k. In London it would be more like £60k because of commuting and cost of living allowances. I hope to eventually aspire to a head of compliance level salary, although not the mega bucks of a big firm (the extra cash would no doubt come at a cost to my time and general health!).
    Lawyered.

    Literally.
 
 
 
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