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    (Original post by xxvine)
    What uni you off too and snag grades do you need?
    Lincoln hopefully. I need 3 Bs but I'm not gonna get it in politics.
    Don't suppose anyone of you know or heard of someone who went to uni with an E. I just want to know what my options will be.
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Omg small world
    What course....
    They will let you in with those grades....
    My mate got in with A*BD
    Studying LLB law, that is if I get the grades, I really am dreading this exam.
    What are you planning on studing?
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    (Original post by Annie.humair)
    Lincoln hopefully. I need 3 Bs but I'm not gonna get it in politics.
    Don't suppose anyone of you know or heard of someone who went to uni with an E. I just want to know what my options will be.
    you should be fine
    that uni are kinda flexible with grades
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    (Original post by studentyear13)
    Studying LLB law, that is if I get the grades, I really am dreading this exam.
    What are you planning on studing?
    same course!!!!! this is too strange

    i am actually worried though because i don't think I'm going to get the grades

    last year they were in clearing for law and people i know with ABB were accepted....
    Don't think they will budge any lower however:
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    (Original post by NOP97)
    Am I the only one doing ideologies for unit 3, and America for unit 4? haha
    I'm doing Unit 3 Ideologies and unit 4 US!

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    (Original post by xxvine)
    same course!!!!! this is too strange

    i am actually worried though because i don't think I'm going to get the grades

    last year they were in clearing for law and people i know with ABB were accepted....
    Don't think they will budge any lower however:
    I wanna study LLB law as well.
    Just explain your situation to them and see what they say. If not I'm sure you can always go somewhere else
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    (Original post by Annie.humair)
    I wanna study LLB law as well.
    Just explain your situation to them and see what they say. If not I'm sure you can always go somewhere else
    Yeah I'll wait till i get my grades
    With all these things it depends
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    same course!!!!! this is too strange

    i am actually worried though because i don't think I'm going to get the grades

    last year they were in clearing for law and people i know with ABB were accepted....
    Don't think they will budge any lower however:
    That is such a coincidence haha, previous years they have been lenient with grades but recently as SOAS has been becoming more popular I have a feeling they won't be as lenient with the entry grades, I feel as though they'll be more strict.
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    I don't expect anyone to be awake rn (:emo:) but for the question 'how and why have liberals supported the fragmentation of political power?' would you only reference constitutionalism? I have no idea how this would be structured...
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    I don't expect anyone to be awake rn (:emo:) but for the question 'how and why have liberals supported the fragmentation of political power?' would you only reference constitutionalism? I have no idea how this would be structured...
    Talk about how they believe power tends to corrupt because humans are self seeking and if they have power they are likely to use it against others and abuse it to their advantage.
    The greater the power, the more scope people have to use it over others and benefit themselves.
    This is why they believe power leads to corruption.
    Fragmentation of power has two advantages:
    1 ensures those who have power only have limited power which means limited ability to control others and therefore preventing absolute power.
    2 fragmented political power creates a network of checks and balances ensuring power is a check on power.
    Fragmentation therefore creates internal constraints that prevent govt from becoming a tyranny against individuals.
    Examples include separation of power, parliamentary govt, judicial independence etc
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    I don't expect anyone to be awake rn (:emo:) but for the question 'how and why have liberals supported the fragmentation of political power?' would you only reference constitutionalism? I have no idea how this would be structured...
    First of of talk about why. (I think the question says why first)
    So liberals fear the concentration of power and individuals are egotistical. As a result individuals in government may become corrupted and use the power invested in them for their own gains at the expense of others
    •Thinker: Lord Acton "power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely"
    - risk of a totalitarian government that may encroach on individuals' freedom, the market etc

    How?
    Constitutionalism: laws and rights that limit government and protect citizens as they are enshrined in law. Government must adhere to the constitution.
    Consent: regular fair election that hold government accountable and ensures government is illegitimate. If government become oppressive or totalitarian the electorate may vote it out. -> social contact theory l
    Seperatuon of powers: judicial, legislative and executive should be carried out by different personal and political institutions
    Federalism: in essence, a devolution of power between Central bodies that prevent the concentration of power and holds government accountable to other political institutions
    • Thinker: Montesquieu "power should be a check to power"
    Liberals believe that these checks and balance ensures government will not become tyrannical, thus government can continue to fulfil its role of serving national interest.
    Did this before I got in the shower :^)
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    (Original post by Annie.humair)
    Talk about how they believe power tends to corrupt because humans are self seeking and if they have power they are likely to use it against others and abuse it to their advantage.
    The greater the power, the more scope people have to use it over others and benefit themselves.
    This is why they believe power leads to corruption.
    Fragmentation of power has two advantages:
    1 ensures those who have power only have limited power which means limited ability to control others and therefore preventing absolute power.
    2 fragmented political power creates a network of checks and balances ensuring power is a check on power.
    Fragmentation therefore creates internal constraints that prevent govt from becoming a tyranny against individuals.
    Examples include separation of power, parliamentary govt, judicial independence etc
    Nice, didn't see your reply. You got it ;D
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    What sort of plan do any of you have for the question 'To what extent do conservatives believe in tradition and continuity?'? Not looking for anything overly detailed, just wondering what sort of layout an essay like that would have, since I'm not really sure how I could stretch something like that out over 5 or so pages. Thanks
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    (Original post by needanewusername)
    What sort of plan do any of you have for the question 'To what extent do conservatives believe in tradition and continuity?'? Not looking for anything overly detailed, just wondering what sort of layout an essay like that would have, since I'm not really sure how I could stretch something like that out over 5 or so pages. Thanks
    I'm literally looking at this question right now Basically you talk about traditional conservatives' views on tradition - it helps psychologically and intellectually imperfect humans, and that tradition is a form of natural law. This shows that traditional conservatives generally are suspicious of change, and only support it when necessary, e.g. One Nationism.

    Then you talk about the New Right, and how neo-liberals are against tradition due to their belief in the rational human. On the other hand, their belief in 19th century economics implies that they dislike what the economy has changed to and so supports a 'traditional' economy. Neo-conservatives, however, also support tradition, as shown by their belief in traditional values.

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    (Original post by blackdiamond97)
    I'm literally looking at this question right now Basically you talk about traditional conservatives' views on tradition - it helps psychologically and intellectually imperfect humans, and that tradition is a form of natural law. This shows that traditional conservatives generally are suspicious of change, and only support it when necessary, e.g. One Nationism.

    Then you talk about the New Right, and how neo-liberals are against tradition due to their belief in the rational human. On the other hand, their belief in 19th century economics implies that they dislike what the economy has changed to and so supports a 'traditional' economy. Neo-conservatives, however, also support tradition, as shown by their belief in traditional values.

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    Okay thanks for the help didn't think about that with neo-liberals and the economy
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    If there was a 15 marker that said distinguish between classic and modern view on individualism, how would you guys answer it?
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    (Original post by Annie.humair)
    Talk about how they believe power tends to corrupt because humans are self seeking and if they have power they are likely to use it against others and abuse it to their advantage.
    The greater the power, the more scope people have to use it over others and benefit themselves.
    This is why they believe power leads to corruption.
    Fragmentation of power has two advantages:
    1 ensures those who have power only have limited power which means limited ability to control others and therefore preventing absolute power.
    2 fragmented political power creates a network of checks and balances ensuring power is a check on power.
    Fragmentation therefore creates internal constraints that prevent govt from becoming a tyranny against individuals.
    Examples include separation of power, parliamentary govt, judicial independence etc
    (Original post by Zilein)
    First of of talk about why. (I think the question says why first)
    So liberals fear the concentration of power and individuals are egotistical. As a result individuals in government may become corrupted and use the power invested in them for their own gains at the expense of others
    •Thinker: Lord Acton "power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely"
    - risk of a totalitarian government that may encroach on individuals' freedom, the market etc

    How?
    Constitutionalism: laws and rights that limit government and protect citizens as they are enshrined in law. Government must adhere to the constitution.
    Consent: regular fair election that hold government accountable and ensures government is illegitimate. If government become oppressive or totalitarian the electorate may vote it out. -> social contact theory l
    Seperatuon of powers: judicial, legislative and executive should be carried out by different personal and political institutions
    Federalism: in essence, a devolution of power between Central bodies that prevent the concentration of power and holds government accountable to other political institutions
    • Thinker: Montesquieu "power should be a check to power"
    Liberals believe that these checks and balance ensures government will not become tyrannical, thus government can continue to fulfil its role of serving national interest.
    Did this before I got in the shower :^)
    Thank you so much guys! :woo:
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    (Original post by Annie.humair)
    If there was a 15 marker that said distinguish between classic and modern view on individualism, how would you guys answer it?
    all liberals believe individuals are unique and have different abilities but still have the power of free will. Differentiate between methodological and ethical individualism

    classical - egoistical so maximum freedom of choice/privacy (Mill's 'harm principle') and minimal state because individuals want to be self-reliant and (because of reason) they are the only ones who know their needs, not the state (negative freedom). Then you could link it to meritocracy and having the same chance to rise and fall in society so you have foundational/formal equality so everyone has the same foundations.

    modern - developmental so human flourishing which needs state intervention and an enabling state to allow humans to reach their full potential (positive freedom) instead of being hindered by social circumstances. This leads to equality of opportunity so there's a level playing field through welfare, e.g. 1942 Beveridge Report

    not sure if I've missed anything out but here's what I would put!
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    Could you get a 15 marker on human imperfection? Has that ever come up?
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    so is anybody in this thread doing America? Horrible, horrible topic which Im clueless about, feel like I could do a better essay on these ideology questions which I haven't even studied
 
 
 
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