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    (Original post by Grant2007)
    Poly pockets can be a pest as you have to take everything out to read the contents. Also if you need to make notes and changes on them it is annoying too! For that reason I don't use them in my class either.


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    For study and especially for portfolios, I usually have everything visible through the wallets anyway . I didn't for planning though, but still found them easier as they grouped each weeks planning and I could just grab it out and spread out, rather than having to go through loads of loose pages or buy hundreds of dividers.


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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    What's wrong? :hugs: Feel free to post on here or PM me. Use this thread as a rant base! That's what we all did.
    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Can I help?
    (Original post by Samus2)
    Feel free to drop me a PM
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    My tutor did too, she said they reminded her of slimy things. I still had everything in them though lol.



    Same as others, happy to listen if you want. Hugs!



    KS1 can be very like that. They very much bounce off each other and if you have lots of children showing challenging behaviour in the class it's even tougher. I had a KS1 placement in a school with lots of behaviour challenges and I completely empathise with the "while you get one quiet the others start!" thing. The thing is, they're still little so even if they want to learn and enjoy it and know the expectations, if they're bored waiting for another pupil to stop talking they will lose focus and join in, plus they'll feel like, what's the point in waiting when others don't?

    I guess clear expectations are key. If you show them what you expect when they work with you that doesn't undermine the teacher. We all know that from remembering how we would know what different teachers expected when we were at school. It's not like they can say "Mrs X let's us talk!" because the teacher doesn't allow it, they just aren't stopping it all the time if that makes sense!

    Remember it's still early in the year. Building positive relationships is so so so important, so I'd focus on that, and remember that the teacher will still be working on that. Once you have that you can interact with them better, and you will know them more, allowing you to figure out each child's needs and how to support them in making good choices.

    Oh also that. Find out as much as possible about the schools behaviour policy then follow it. If possible I'd recommend using the language "Make a good choice" and praising good choices, and emphasising the positive child and all the good things about them. It really really works if you can do it consistently and also it's nice! Saves you stress, makes them feel positive about themselves.

    A lot of challenging behaviour at that age is about either attention, self image or stress and worry at home, and the above works for all those. Make school somewhere safe and happy for all your pupils. Also, always look to the root... What is the behaviour for - it's aim right now - and then what us the deeper cause or reason for this. It's much easier to tackle with that knowledge.

    Don't panic, keep calm. If it all goes horribly wrong (and it will) there's always next lesson. They are forgiving and learn quickly, treat it as a clean slate and they will too. Praise them. Keep their learning active and interesting. Use your voice well, if you need to attract attention during a time when they are talking LOWER your tone, don't go higher!

    Most of all, don't let anything get to you, and give yourself a break. It's hard but it will get better and better and better! Talk it through, go over strategies in your head or out loud if it helps. And look after yourself.

    Hope some of this helps! Good luck.

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    (Original post by tory88)
    As with everyone else, if you want a chat I'm available. (Or just post on here with quotes and we'll all see it)
    (Original post by neilcn)
    I alternate between loving the teaching and being overwhelmed by the workload and uncertainty of what is required for improvement. I rather think that at this stage, feeling overwhelmed for some, if not most of the time is common to us all........it certainly is amongst the SD trainees in my school!

    I'm having a good night tonight after a good observation today.......but from my experience over the past few weeks I'm sure the next cliff to climb will be coming into view tomorrow! .
    Thanks everyone. I think the main thing is the timetable. Kpsxx knows that I'm in a slightly different position because I teach TEFL. I feel like people are running rings around me and they get annoyed if I can't give them the time slot they want. Most of them have kids too which complicates matters. I don't want to be working all hours.

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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Thanks everyone. I think the main thing is the timetable. Kpsxx knows that I'm in a slightly different position because I teach TEFL. I feel like people are running rings around me and they get annoyed if I can't give them the time slot they want. Most of them have kids too which complicates matters. I don't want to be working all hours.

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    How do they organise the lessons - do they book in person with you?

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    How do they organise the lessons - do they book in person with you?

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    No they go through an academy. I do have my own private students too who do book in person with me. I try to keep to the same day and time every week.


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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    No they go through an academy. I do have my own private students too who do book in person with me. I try to keep to the same day and time every week.


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    Then I would say it's on the academy to deal with this (after all, isn't that supposed to be one of the benefits of working through them? They take care of the bookings and that side of the admin?). If students are trying to give you issues just keep cool and apologise, say that all bookings are handled through the academy and if there are any issues it's them they need to consult.
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    Thanks so much - this has defo helped to clear everything up for me. I've spent the past week putting everything together & organising my files based on what you said


    (Original post by Samus2)
    lesson plans, lessons obs, your own obs of other staff, seating plans, worksheets, photocopies of student work to show your marking
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Assuming this is a folder for assessing you, a good way to do it if you have no guidelines is print off the full teaching standards and have a section for each one. As you move through the year add evidence that related to each bit to the relevant section. Then you can easily see that you've got evidence for them all, and which ones are lacking as you move through. Just don't panic as you won't have evidence for some of them until much later in the year.

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    (Original post by hana&feather)
    We spent 3 hours talking about the prof standards and we got a chance to look at some graduates' files. While we are in Primary it's possibly similar for secondary. We were told to get 9 sections for each of the standards and subdivide into each sub-section - a plastic pocket for each sub-section, and start collecting evidence as we go along (there'll be a selecting process towards the end to choose the best evidence. We'll write for each sub-section how the evidence show that we meet the standards). Echoing others, evidence can be lesson plans, observation notes, children's work, classroom display, code of conduct, uni's comment on professionalism, etc. We're expected to have something for 8 sub-standards by the end of our first placement (working with one child and groups), then getting 50% by Feb half-term. Some standards say 'consistent' and the evidence for that should be collected over a period of time, etc.

    On top of it my uni wants a teaching file with school + class details, personal learning journal, all lesson plans + resources, assessments, medium and LT plans, observation notes etc. for each placement. That is of course in addition to our subject portfolios.

    That was a daunting afternoon: one person hasn't returned since it seems. So I'm a bit surprised that your provider hasn't talked about it in depth yet. We do have a book on our list by Achieving QTS series, which explains the standards very well and has some case examples - but I haven't got the time to read it properly!

    Those trolleys are excellent, unlessunpopular like me you use the London Underground - proved to be very unpopular and hazardous with my steering skill.
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    HELP PLEASE!

    I am a mixed race trainee teacher and while I am aware that nationally BME teachers are low in numbers I have never felt it was a problem for me.
    During a lesson a Y9 pupil asked me where I am from...innocent enough. I responded with my by telling him my hometown and he kept hammering the question - where am i from? I told him that we could talk about that at break but now we'll do the work. From my previous experience this question either leads to two directs: an interest of my family heritage or potential racism.
    The next day the same student asked the same questions again except this time he went further and called me a negro. I promptly told him that it was unacceptable language to use and that was the end of that.

    The problem is...I found the word deeply offensive and it did upset me, and it made me feel uncomfortable. I know its not PC but I didn't feel i could tell the class teacher because I wasn't sure if she would understand how i feel.

    The question is - do you think the word negro is offensive. should i tell the teacher if it happens again? am i making a fuss out of nothing?Do i have a valid point or not. (if you disagree with me - please only civilized responses, no hating!)
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    (Original post by shanzy_91)
    HELP PLEASE!

    I am a mixed race trainee teacher and while I am aware that nationally BME teachers are low in numbers I have never felt it was a problem for me.
    During a lesson a Y9 pupil asked me where I am from...innocent enough. I responded with my by telling him my hometown and he kept hammering the question - where am i from? I told him that we could talk about that at break but now we'll do the work. From my previous experience this question either leads to two directs: an interest of my family heritage or potential racism.
    The next day the same student asked the same questions again except this time he went further and called me a negro. I promptly told him that it was unacceptable language to use and that was the end of that.

    The problem is...I found the word deeply offensive and it did upset me, and it made me feel uncomfortable. I know its not PC but I didn't feel i could tell the class teacher because I wasn't sure if she would understand how i feel.

    The question is - do you think the word negro is offensive. should i tell the teacher if it happens again? am i making a fuss out of nothing?Do i have a valid point or not. (if you disagree with me - please only civilized responses, no hating!)
    You certainly shouldn't feel bad for feeling upset about the use of this word. As a trainee or teacher you have a right to work without feeling harassed or uncomfortable due to things like this.

    Of course, working as a teacher you will have times when you experience things like this, especially for secondary pupils who are very much figuring out what's ok and what's not, including exploring language. So being able to keep calm and try and detach yourself personally is a good skill which you can work on throughout your career. However, that doesn't mean its OK for the pupil to do it, or that it should be ignored. I would certainly tell the class teacher - there may be a specific policy or way of recording the incident that you need to know about. She is a professional, and should deal with the matter in a professional way. It sounds like you handled it really well at the time, so give yourself a big pat on the back for that.


    The pupil probably knows full well the potential connotations of the use of the word, although there is a chance they don't and have just heard it through family or friends who never mentioned its potential to offend. For an example, I had heard a potentially offensive term for a mixed race person used by a friend, but not often, as a teenager - I come from an area with a very high percentage of white Caucasian citizens. I had no idea that the term was considered offensive for around a year after I first heard it! So it can happen.

    The most important thing is consistency... If the pupil says something with an intent to offend or upset a teacher, the response should be the same.

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    Accidental double post, sorry! Can't delete on App.
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    (Original post by shanzy_91)
    HELP PLEASE!

    I am a mixed race trainee teacher and while I am aware that nationally BME teachers are low in numbers I have never felt it was a problem for me.
    During a lesson a Y9 pupil asked me where I am from...innocent enough. I responded with my by telling him my hometown and he kept hammering the question - where am i from? I told him that we could talk about that at break but now we'll do the work. From my previous experience this question either leads to two directs: an interest of my family heritage or potential racism.
    The next day the same student asked the same questions again except this time he went further and called me a negro. I promptly told him that it was unacceptable language to use and that was the end of that.

    The problem is...I found the word deeply offensive and it did upset me, and it made me feel uncomfortable. I know its not PC but I didn't feel i could tell the class teacher because I wasn't sure if she would understand how i feel.

    The question is - do you think the word negro is offensive. should i tell the teacher if it happens again? am i making a fuss out of nothing?Do i have a valid point or not. (if you disagree with me - please only civilized responses, no hating!)
    I agree with kpwxx, it sounds to me like you handled the situation really well, considering you were upset by it! So congrats on that, it's probably the one thing that a lot of trainees on my course would struggle with.

    In my opinion, I wouldn't think that the word negro is offensive... but that's my opinion as a caucasian, and as an adult I accept that my opinion differs from other people. But another opinion that I hold is that being offended by things is a waste of energy, and so I don't often find myself offended by things because I don't want to be (maybe I'm just too lazy!).

    If something is offensive to you, you have every right to talk to the class teacher about it, if for no other reason than she can give you advice on how best to deal with situations like that. Even if she doesn't fully understand how you feel about this particular incidence, chances are that she has felt similar about something.

    My advice here is to continue reacting as appropriately as you did - by saying that any language you find offensive is unacceptable, and put a stop to it that way. But at the same time, measure your reaction based on whether you feel that the student is being deliberately offensive, or if they are unaware that they have offended you. And before another situation like this can occur, talk to other teachers about how they handle things that may be perceived as racist or offensive. They have a lot to teach you, and not all of it can be learned by just watching them teach!
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    I'd say the word negro is definitely offensive and can't imagine that the student doesn't know so as well. You don't get to 13/14 without realising that at the very least it isnt a common word for a black person and should be considering why that is.

    Combined with the persistent badgering about where you come from, I don't see any reason to give the student the benefit of the doubt.

    Definitely tell your mentor what happened. It could be that this pupil has a history of behaviour like this that won't be dealt with if no one reports them.

    I also think emotional things like this come better from an established teacher. As a trainee, you don't need any extra problems that could come from the kids gossipping that "Sir/Miss made a fuss". Whereas an outsider telling them they were offensive can have more impact. It's a disappointing fact of bigotry that often the victims are considered to be oversensitive until someone else stands with them.
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    (Original post by Georgiacosta)
    Heyyy all! I have read through the last few pages just to see everyone's experience thus far! I think it's evident people are struggling with folders etc. Being quite OCD I would prefer to have a physical copy of everything and put them in allocated folders but my course leader is very technical and so he just set up a DropBox account and we upload everything in there! So no mahoosive folders!

    I am doing Secondary English and have just finished my second week at uni. I don't go into school until next Wednesday so probably won't start teaching until after half term! First two weeks at uni were intense though! I cannot imagine what school life would be like lol

    What is everyone's school like? All my experience is in well managed, well behaved schools where I never had to use behaviour management techniques but my placement school is quite the contrary so I am very nervous! I have a lecture on this issue on Monday so hopefully will put my nerves at ease and I have been reading every article, journal, book, Internet site etc I could get my hands on!

    Tonight is my first night where I have tried not to think about school or uni and planned to have a bottle of wine and Netflix but lol I am thinking about is school, school, school! Lol

    [SIZE=1][URL=http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/app]Posted f[
    Relax! Give yourself some more hours over the weekend too, or ideally a whole day.

    Don't panic. The lecture will help a bit but behaviour is a huge topic and you will still likely feel a bit unprepared... That's normal! It's something that honestly just takes practice, and it will get better every day (mostly!).

    You will already have been doing behaviour management, just in a positive way. Try and think of all the reasons WHY the pupils you've worked with before behaved in a positive way, and that will help you get an idea of what you're aiming for.

    Also, as people said to me many times, if you're in a tough placement school behaviour wise it will set you up very well for the future. You'll know you can do anything! In my job interviews people basically assumed my behaviour management was great because I had good grades for placement at a tough school. It really does help with jobs, as well as building more experience and strategies.

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    You will already have been doing behaviour management, just in a positive way. Try and think of all the reasons WHY the pupils you've worked with before behaved in a positive way, and that will help you get an idea of what you're aiming for.
    The main reasons why will be to do with their upbringing: completely out of teachers' control. No matter how good your behaviour management techniques are, there's no substitute for teaching kids who've been raised to be polite, or kids that have had a bed-time enforced by their parents so they come to school after having had a good night's sleep.

    What you say in your last paragraph is very true though. It's definitely brilliant experience to be training in a school with tougher behaviour than you want to be dealing with, though it may put you off the profession.
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    To the PGCErs, I have one valuable tip for you...Do NOT worry about finding evidence for your teaching standards for now! At this stage it's about finding your feet with life at uni(lectures, and the odd assignment) and your school placement.
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    For applications would it be bad to have your reference from a head of department at a private school? I have an amazing placement at one where I get supervised teaching with feedback
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    How and Why are there still places being advertised for 2015 entry????
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    You certainly shouldn't feel bad for feeling upset about the use of this word. As a trainee or teacher you have a right to work without feeling harassed or uncomfortable due to things like this.Of course, working as a teacher you will have times when you experience things like this, especially for secondary pupils who are very much figuring out what's ok and what's not, including exploring language. So being able to keep calm and try and detach yourself personally is a good skill which you can work on throughout your career. However, that doesn't mean its OK for the pupil to do it, or that it should be ignored. I would certainly tell the class teacher - there may be a specific policy or way of recording the incident that you need to know about. She is a professional, and should deal with the matter in a professional way. It sounds like you handled it really well at the time, so give yourself a big pat on the back for that. The pupil probably knows full well the potential connotations of the use of the word, although there is a chance they don't and have just heard it through family or friends who never mentioned its potential to offend. For an example, I had heard a potentially offensive term for a mixed race person used by a friend, but not often, as a teenager - I come from an area with a very high percentage of white Caucasian citizens. I had no idea that the term was considered offensive for around a year after I first heard it! So it can happen.The most important thing is consistency... If the pupil says something with an intent to offend or upset a teacher, the response should be the same.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you for your advice - you've given me the courage to mention it to the class teacher and see how it goes from there. Thank you for being sympathetic and supportive towards me.

    (Original post by beanbrain)
    I agree with kpwxx, it sounds to me like you handled the situation really well, considering you were upset by it! So congrats on that, it's probably the one thing that a lot of trainees on my course would struggle with.In my opinion, I wouldn't think that the word negro is offensive... but that's my opinion as a caucasian, and as an adult I accept that my opinion differs from other people. But another opinion that I hold is that being offended by things is a waste of energy, and so I don't often find myself offended by things because I don't want to be (maybe I'm just too lazy!).If something is offensive to you, you have every right to talk to the class teacher about it, if for no other reason than she can give you advice on how best to deal with situations like that. Even if she doesn't fully understand how you feel about this particular incidence, chances are that she has felt similar about something.My advice here is to continue reacting as appropriately as you did - by saying that any language you find offensive is unacceptable, and put a stop to it that way. But at the same time, measure your reaction based on whether you feel that the student is being deliberately offensive, or if they are unaware that they have offended you. And before another situation like this can occur, talk to other teachers about how they handle things that may be perceived as racist or offensive. They have a lot to teach you, and not all of it can be learned by just watching them teach!
    Thanks for your insight. I'm not one to get offended easily and tend not to take offense easily at things but I think the unexpected element of the comment took me by surprise. If it happens again I will mention it to the class teacher and see what advice they have for me. Thank you for being supportive.


    (Original post by JoannaMilano)
    I'd say the word negro is definitely offensive and can't imagine that the student doesn't know so as well. You don't get to 13/14 without realising that at the very least it isnt a common word for a black person and should be considering why that is.Combined with the persistent badgering about where you come from, I don't see any reason to give the student the benefit of the doubt.Definitely tell your mentor what happened. It could be that this pupil has a history of behaviour like this that won't be dealt with if no one reports them.I also think emotional things like this come better from an established teacher. As a trainee, you don't need any extra problems that could come from the kids gossipping that "Sir/Miss made a fuss". Whereas an outsider telling them they were offensive can have more impact. It's a disappointing fact of bigotry that often the victims are considered to be oversensitive until someone else stands with them.
    Thanks for seeing where I am coming from. The school that I am placed at has a lower than national average BME pupils and I am the only BME staff...but obviously I don't want to come across that I am the one causing the problems, as they've never had any issues at the school before. I will talk to my mentor about this - I hadn't considered that an established teacher in the school having this chat with a pupil might have the desired impact. Thank you for your advice.
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    For applications would it be bad to have your reference from a head of department at a private school? I have an amazing placement at one where I get supervised teaching with feedback
    I don't see how it would make any difference what type of school the teacher works in. So long as they can vouch for you and have positive things about your capacity to be a teacher and work with children/young people then you should be set. Good luck with your application!
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    For applications would it be bad to have your reference from a head of department at a private school? I have an amazing placement at one where I get supervised teaching with feedback
    It will be fine but private school experience doesn't count towards the 2 week experience needed for most PGCE courses - it needs to be a state school
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    (Original post by Samus2)
    It will be fine but private school experience doesn't count towards the 2 week experience needed for most PGCE courses - it needs to be a state school
    Right now I have:
    5 days state secondary
    5 days state primary
    5 days HMC independent
    5 days ISC independent girls only
    3 days ISC grammar

    going to be volunteering next term in state secondary teaching assistants to boost up the secondary experience.

    Oxford want 1 day, Cambridge 5-10, Durham 10. Am I lacking in experience in the state area? (I'm applying for shortage subject).
 
 
 
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