Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JoannaMilano)
    No, that was so helpful and reassuring! I've actually only been teaching them for a week now so you've really reminded me that I'm absolutely being too harsh on myself. It's so easy to lose perspective, especially when I seem to have a much more challenging class than a lot of my friends so I feel so crap when they're getting Goods and I'm Inadequate.

    Theyre known as a tough class through the school. They had four teachers last year (Year 3) and three during Year 1. And they're very low ability in general, and way behind on the curriculum to boot. So it seems an odd choice to put them with me. I don't mean that as in "poor me getting a tough class", but thinking of whats best for the kids. They've had a lack of stability and are playing catch up big time on the curriculum- is it good for them to have a trainee teacher right now? I really don't know.
    When I wrote that reply I had just been posting on the NQT thread and I forgot I'd switched to the PGCE thread, so my advice about not beating yourself up is increased tenfold if you've only had them a week! Good lord, no wonder you can't handle them! And it's not at all fair of the school to have given you the class, not on you and not on them either, unless there really was no alternative. It smacks of a mentor deciding to give themselves some time off, rather than considering what is best for all parties, but of course I don't know the circumstances or the rationale behind it.

    If it's any consideration, a tough time on first practice is usually followed by a compensatory nice placement on the second, and it feels doubly good because you've learned a lot the hard way in a short space of time on the first one. In the meantime, give yourself permission to be a beginner!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Well done Joanna, a positive spin and outlook on a very tricky placement. Good luck. X


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks guys, I'll just keep my chin up until Christmas I'll have a KS1 class next term, so if nothing else my stern teacher persona that I'm developing now will probably be a bit more effective on them!
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Just found out where my second School Direct placement will be, come the spring term. It's so different in terms of demographics, to my current school, so I'm pretty excited. Thankfully, one of the others on my course is in the class currently, so I'll be able to get the low down from her before I go!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I feel like freaking out: 2 weeks left in the current non-teaching TA type placement, and the brief moments I tried to face the class alone (like lining up after break) had been disastrous. I find myself re-teaching them at group time (who came up with the idea of doing column additions with Y2s?!) resulting in little questions done in the books. Although the CT and other staff had been really nice, and would like me back for teaching placement, I am just so not confident about behaviour management for the whole class. I have built good relationship with some pupils (even a couple of more challenging ones) but a few of them I'm not connecting at all. The teaching placement will start in 3 weeks but I am still clueless about teacher presence etc. The uni sessions were not much help on this.

    Anyone else can shed lights on working in inner-city schools with high deprivation? I found that the staff who manage them 'better' are 'rougher' and louder, but I am naturally soft spoken. Is there another way to manage without a complete change of personality? We do have traffic lights, points, songs, tambourine, waiting for silence, praising good behaviour etc. but they don't always work.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hana&feather)
    I feel like freaking out: 2 weeks left in the current non-teaching TA type placement, and the brief moments I tried to face the class alone (like lining up after break) had been disastrous. I find myself re-teaching them at group time (who came up with the idea of doing column additions with Y2s?!) resulting in little questions done in the books. Although the CT and other staff had been really nice, and would like me back for teaching placement, I am just so not confident about behaviour management for the whole class. I have built good relationship with some pupils (even a couple of more challenging ones) but a few of them I'm not connecting at all. The teaching placement will start in 3 weeks but I am still clueless about teacher presence etc. The uni sessions were not much help on this.

    Anyone else can shed lights on working in inner-city schools with high deprivation? I found that the staff who manage them 'better' are 'rougher' and louder, but I am naturally soft spoken. Is there another way to manage without a complete change of personality? We do have traffic lights, points, songs, tambourine, waiting for silence, praising good behaviour etc. but they don't always work.
    It really depends in the children as individuals and as a group. For some classes being calm and quiet (but still clear and confident) will work wonders.

    If you are female though, do try to keep your tone low rather than high.

    Moat of all don't worry. You're at a very early point. Reading and hearing about theory is a good thing to do (the essence... Be positive, emphasise the child's choice, and try and figure out the root cause of behaviour in the long run) but ultimately the confidence and quick thinking to actually get good behaviour from a class is just one of those things that comes with practise. It will be very scary at first, there will be disastrous lessons where you spend the whole time crowd controlling and completely miss the learning, there will be a lot of frustration, but it will get better and better over the months and years Keep reminding yourself of your small triumphs... You will be amazed how far you've come by the end of the year!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Feel so
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Feel so
    Can we help?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I am holding down this PGCE well, so far!

    Just sucks that I have not been able to crack on with my uni assignment due to school work...... =/
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hana&feather)
    I feel like freaking out: 2 weeks left in the current non-teaching TA type placement, and the brief moments I tried to face the class alone (like lining up after break) had been disastrous. I find myself re-teaching them at group time (who came up with the idea of doing column additions with Y2s?!) resulting in little questions done in the books. Although the CT and other staff had been really nice, and would like me back for teaching placement, I am just so not confident about behaviour management for the whole class. I have built good relationship with some pupils (even a couple of more challenging ones) but a few of them I'm not connecting at all. The teaching placement will start in 3 weeks but I am still clueless about teacher presence etc. The uni sessions were not much help on this.

    Anyone else can shed lights on working in inner-city schools with high deprivation? I found that the staff who manage them 'better' are 'rougher' and louder, but I am naturally soft spoken. Is there another way to manage without a complete change of personality? We do have traffic lights, points, songs, tambourine, waiting for silence, praising good behaviour etc. but they don't always work.
    I've started my teacher training this year but because I'm on the schools direct route I have been teaching for over a month. The relationship you have with the children will change when the children start to see you as a teacher instead of a TA, Obviously, in an ideal world a TA would command the same respect as a teacher but that isn't the world we live in. The transition between the TA and teaching period was a difficult time for me but it wasn't long until the children started to see me as a teacher. It will probably be the same for you.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    It really depends in the children as individuals and as a group. For some classes being calm and quiet (but still clear and confident) will work wonders.

    If you are female though, do try to keep your tone low rather than high.

    Moat of all don't worry. You're at a very early point. Reading and hearing about theory is a good thing to do (the essence... Be positive, emphasise the child's choice, and try and figure out the root cause of behaviour in the long run) but ultimately the confidence and quick thinking to actually get good behaviour from a class is just one of those things that comes with practise. It will be very scary at first, there will be disastrous lessons where you spend the whole time crowd controlling and completely miss the learning, there will be a lot of frustration, but it will get better and better over the months and years Keep reminding yourself of your small triumphs... You will be amazed how far you've come by the end of the year!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by wildrover)
    I've started my teacher training this year but because I'm on the schools direct route I have been teaching for over a month. The relationship you have with the children will change when the children start to see you as a teacher instead of a TA, Obviously, in an ideal world a TA would command the same respect as a teacher but that isn't the world we live in. The transition between the TA and teaching period was a difficult time for me but it wasn't long until the children started to see me as a teacher. It will probably be the same for you.
    Thank you - this week it has been so much better as I gave some positive points first thing in the morning - that got some of them to behave. They are still a challenge (even for their normal CT) at times but at least I'm no longer focusing on the bad incidents. Shame only 1 more week left and I'll miss them...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys!!

    I've been offered a place at UEL, and also have an interview coming up at UCL IOE. I'm leaning towards IOE atm as I'd like to go into academia later on, but UEL placements would be much more convenient for me...

    I haven't been able to find experiences of UEL anywhere - did anyone train there/is anyone there currently? Would you recommend? How academic is the course?
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hana&feather)
    I feel like freaking out: 2 weeks left in the current non-teaching TA type placement, and the brief moments I tried to face the class alone (like lining up after break) had been disastrous. I find myself re-teaching them at group time (who came up with the idea of doing column additions with Y2s?!) resulting in little questions done in the books. Although the CT and other staff had been really nice, and would like me back for teaching placement, I am just so not confident about behaviour management for the whole class. I have built good relationship with some pupils (even a couple of more challenging ones) but a few of them I'm not connecting at all. The teaching placement will start in 3 weeks but I am still clueless about teacher presence etc. The uni sessions were not much help on this.

    Anyone else can shed lights on working in inner-city schools with high deprivation? I found that the staff who manage them 'better' are 'rougher' and louder, but I am naturally soft spoken. Is there another way to manage without a complete change of personality? We do have traffic lights, points, songs, tambourine, waiting for silence, praising good behaviour etc. but they don't always work.
    There are always some pupils you aren't going to connect with; I'm afraid that's just a reality in teaching (although moreso in Secondary, to be fair). Dynamics with the class can't really be taught, as they're so unique to an individual - it'll come with practice and trying things out. It'll come on really quickly, and will always be improving. Don't worry too much about it at first, just look forward to getting the opportunity to try things out.

    I was placed in a tough inner-city comp on my second placement, and can assure you that being gruff and aggressive is not the only way to go. Some teachers are really good at being softly spoken and menacing, and some do well by being disappointed. And different approaches will work with different classes.Definitely don't feel pushed into aggression - I got through my entire training year without shouting at an individual pupil, and have only done so once overall (calculated, for effect on a particularly tough class).

    (Original post by ChancedTravels)
    Hi guys!!

    I've been offered a place at UEL, and also have an interview coming up at UCL IOE. I'm leaning towards IOE atm as I'd like to go into academia later on, but UEL placements would be much more convenient for me...

    I haven't been able to find experiences of UEL anywhere - did anyone train there/is anyone there currently? Would you recommend? How academic is the course?
    I can offer advice from the other side - I attended the IoE despite a really inconvenient commute. The IoE are pretty good at finding placements, even really far away from the university (a fair few people were placed in SE London/Kent, for example). And for the quality of the instruction, the inconvenience is definitely worth it in my opinion.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tory88)
    There are always some pupils you aren't going to connect with; I'm afraid that's just a reality in teaching (although moreso in Secondary, to be fair). Dynamics with the class can't really be taught, as they're so unique to an individual - it'll come with practice and trying things out. It'll come on really quickly, and will always be improving. Don't worry too much about it at first, just look forward to getting the opportunity to try things out.

    I was placed in a tough inner-city comp on my second placement, and can assure you that being gruff and aggressive is not the only way to go. Some teachers are really good at being softly spoken and menacing, and some do well by being disappointed. And different approaches will work with different classes.Definitely don't feel pushed into aggression - I got through my entire training year without shouting at an individual pupil, and have only done so once overall (calculated, for effect on a particularly tough class).



    I can offer advice from the other side - I attended the IoE despite a really inconvenient commute. The IoE are pretty good at finding placements, even really far away from the university (a fair few people were placed in SE London/Kent, for example). And for the quality of the instruction, the inconvenience is definitely worth it in my opinion.
    Thank you! Hearing a lot of good things about IOE... So just hoping I get a place now!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    How is everyone getting on? Can't believe there's only 4 weeks until Christmas!

    I'm actually really enjoying placement and the Pgce in general so far, though having spent over a year reading horror stories on the internet I now feel almost stressed about not being stressed!? I know that sounds ridiculous but I feel like I must be doing something wrong to not feel like that? :/

    Also planning on getting my mentor a thank you/Christmas present but should I be getting something for the other teachers whose classes I take? Not sure if there is an established etiquette?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    How do teaching bursaries (specifically high ones) affect student finance and any bursaries the university may give you? Does it class as an income?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Bursaries have no bearing on student finance. I doubt that the university will be willing to offer you a bursary in addition to the subject bursary. Bursaries are tax-free so don't count as income.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by magic_box)
    How is everyone getting on? Can't believe there's only 4 weeks until Christmas!

    I'm actually really enjoying placement and the Pgce in general so far, though having spent over a year reading horror stories on the internet I now feel almost stressed about not being stressed!? I know that sounds ridiculous but I feel like I must be doing something wrong to not feel like that? :/

    Also planning on getting my mentor a thank you/Christmas present but should I be getting something for the other teachers whose classes I take? Not sure if there is an established etiquette?
    I feel the same way - not too stressed at all, although sometimes I feel like the weekends aren't long enough! We got told on Friday that if we weren't doing some work in the evenings, we weren't working hard enough... which I felt a bit annoyed about, because I specifically don't work every evening, but spend most of the weekend doing or thinking about lessons.

    Not sure about Christmas presents... Since I'm at a small school, I think presents are out in favour of the meal out together. In terms of a thank you present, I'll be giving him that at the end of the year - he has to get me through it before I thank him, lol!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by magic_box)
    How is everyone getting on? Can't believe there's only 4 weeks until Christmas!

    I'm actually really enjoying placement and the Pgce in general so far, though having spent over a year reading horror stories on the internet I now feel almost stressed about not being stressed!? I know that sounds ridiculous but I feel like I must be doing something wrong to not feel like that? :/

    Also planning on getting my mentor a thank you/Christmas present but should I be getting something for the other teachers whose classes I take? Not sure if there is an established etiquette?
    I felt the same to be honest. Second placement was more stressful but nothing unbearable.

    The hardest thing about the pgce (and pretty much teaching in general) for me is the constant criticism. I never feel like I'm good enough even if I get outstanding. I guess that's just how it is though.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It's good to hear that you have good placements! I found out that I'm still in the same school and same key stage for my next placement up until Feb half-term. The challenge will be re-establishing myself as a 'teacher' rather than a TA/student.

    Been spending hours doing my assignment and pulling together evidence for the Standards file then my coloured printer is not working. The pictures look horrible in B&W. This weekend has been absolutely packed but hopefully I'll get some breathing space next week after Tutor grading of first placement.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.