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    (Original post by youjustburnkid)
    If I were to revise S + E inequalities that exist in the USA, the gov. policies in place to reduce them, and the effectiveness of the policies, would I technically be able to write a S+E inequalities essay and an american dream one?
    Yeah I would think so except the American dream you include political inequalities I I think :/
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    Does anyone have an essay on ethnic minorities influencing outcome of elections????


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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    I mailed uu
    Sorry but could you please mail me it aswell ?? I've got some if you want
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    Very recent article (from only 6 hours ago!) on the immigration debate in the US and its implications:
    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013...ls-for-reform/
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    (Original post by Beccabarrow)
    Yeh of course ill do that the now! Thanks so much would appreciate it so much
    Could I get them too, please? @beccabarrow
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)

    What topics are you doing?
    voting systems/attitudes, health and wealth, America and Africa you?
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    does anyone have any idea what to mention in question about devolution like 2007 and 2010, i've talked about the Scotland Act and the extent of reserved powers but no idea what else
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    FPTP VS AMS
    The first past the post system is used in west minster elections. There is 650 Constituencies each constituency elects one MP. The MP then represents the constituency in Parliament. Contrary, the Additional Member System is used in Scottish elections. It is a hybrid system of FPTP+PR. The Scottish parliament has 129 MSSP (73 constituency MSPS+ 56 regional list MSPs.)
    FPTP is a single majoritarian system and for this, many weaknesses are seen. To become an MP a candidate only has to win more votes than any other single candidate. To be elected no quota has to be achieved. This creates multiple ‘near winners’ meaning the winner wins with a small share of the vote. For example, Angus McNeil held the western Isles (2010) for the SNP with only 6,723 votes. There was over 1,000 unsuccessful candidates who won more votes than he did. On the contrary, AMS is broadly proportional- meaning that the results reflect broadly the will of the people. For example, in the 2011 election the SNP won 45.4% of the votes and gained 53 seats. This means that Holy Rood reflects public opinion broadly.
    AMS offers voters more choice. With AMS voters receive 2 votes- one for a candidate and one for a party. A voter may choice to vote for a Liberal Dem candidate in the constituency vote, but vote Green in the party vote. However, with FTPT voter choice is limited. Using FPTP the voter is only able to vote for one candidate. For example, in the 2010 UK general election in the Banff and Buchan constituency, voters could only chose one candidate from a list of five which included one candidate from each of the Labour, Conservative, Lib Dem and the BNP parties. There AMS has the advantage that it offers more choice to the people with regard to elections.
    A main advantage of first past the post is that it retains a close geographical link between constituents and MP’s which makes them more accountable to problems and scandals. For example Jacqui Smith the former Home secretary, lost her seat in the 2010 general election because of the expense scandal. However, even though AMS gives voters more representatives ( 1 MSP and 7 Regional) the role of the regional list MSP is obscure. To whom are they accountable? The Voters or their party? It is important to note that the party list MSP’s gives huge power to parties- they choose the names on the list and the order not the voters. This is particularly important as ‘loyalty points’ are often associated with Conservative ideology.
    In the event of an MP dying or resigning, by elections can be held under FTPT offering more choice for the voter. As the country is split into constituencies under FPTP the public can easily choose someone to replace an MP for their constituency. For example, Ian Mckenzie, won the Inverclyde by election to the UK parliament following the death of Labour MP David Cairns in May 2011. Whereas, there is no by election facility for list MSP’s under the AMS. The party leadership decided the placing of candidates on the party list. If a list MSP resigns it is the next person on the list who takes up the seat. For example, when Conservative MSP Mary Scanlon stood down as a list MSP for the Highland and Island in 2006, David Petrie took up the seat as he was listed on the party list. This shows that voters have more choice that they representatives are under FPTP by elections.
    It could be argued that FPTP is more responsive to the will of the people as it usually produces a majority government. This means that the government can pass bills easily in the house of commons without any rebellion or over use of the whip system. Prior to 2010, the previous 7 elections had produced a decisive result. This is good as it provides a stable government and provides stability in terms of economy as many people know where they stand in terms of economy, taxation, interest rates and currency. However, a proportional system like AMS usually produces coalitons although this is not the case with the current SNP government in Scotland. However, there is a huge weakness associated with the threat of a coalition. For example, using the AMS system in the 2007 Scottish parliament election no party had a working majority. The liberal democrats refused to join SNP resulting in the SNP forming a minority government.
    The AMS could be seen is more responsive to the British people as ‘top up’ votes are used. The list MSP’s ‘top up’ the constituency MSP’s to make the result overall, within a region of approximately with the wishes of the electrocrate. For example, in the 2011, Scottish Parliamentary election Labour received 3 ‘top up’ MSP to reflect its level of support across the North east regions as it received 44,000 in the 2nd vote. Unlike this system, FPTP offers no prizes for coming second. In the 2010 Westminster election, UKIP received 900,000 votes, but received no seats using this system as there support was spread out throughout different constituencies.
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Typing it up now be 5 mins
    i emailed you btw!
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    can someone please explain a government policies to reduce wealth and health inequalities? is this even a question?

    I know how to do one on poverty (wealth), like unemployment, low wages, gender, race, age.

    health is diet, exercise, smoking, drinking then you could talk about health inequalities between gender/race/age

    can you get a question on the two?
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    Big question here for development in Africa.

    What do people think the question will be between

    Political factors influencing development in Africa
    Social factors influencing development in Africa
    Economic factors influencing development in Africa
    ‘Economic issues are the most important factors affecting development in Africa.’ Discuss (Basically any question like this where you compare all three, political, social and economic in one essay)
    Effectiveness of UN in Africa
    Effectiveness of NGOs in Africa

    What do people think are the two most likely as I've seen all mentioned?
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    FPTP VS AMS
    The first past the post system is used in west minster elections. There is 650 Constituencies each constituency elects one MP. The MP then represents the constituency in Parliament. Contrary, the Additional Member System is used in Scottish elections. It is a hybrid system of FPTP+PR. The Scottish parliament has 129 MSSP (73 constituency MSPS+ 56 regional list MSPs.)
    FPTP is a single majoritarian system and for this, many weaknesses are seen. To become an MP a candidate only has to win more votes than any other single candidate. To be elected no quota has to be achieved. This creates multiple ‘near winners’ meaning the winner wins with a small share of the vote. For example, Angus McNeil held the western Isles (2010) for the SNP with only 6,723 votes. There was over 1,000 unsuccessful candidates who won more votes than he did. On the contrary, AMS is broadly proportional- meaning that the results reflect broadly the will of the people. For example, in the 2011 election the SNP won 45.4% of the votes and gained 53 seats. This means that Holy Rood reflects public opinion broadly.
    AMS offers voters more choice. With AMS voters receive 2 votes- one for a candidate and one for a party. A voter may choice to vote for a Liberal Dem candidate in the constituency vote, but vote Green in the party vote. However, with FTPT voter choice is limited. Using FPTP the voter is only able to vote for one candidate. For example, in the 2010 UK general election in the Banff and Buchan constituency, voters could only chose one candidate from a list of five which included one candidate from each of the Labour, Conservative, Lib Dem and the BNP parties. There AMS has the advantage that it offers more choice to the people with regard to elections.
    A main advantage of first past the post is that it retains a close geographical link between constituents and MP’s which makes them more accountable to problems and scandals. For example Jacqui Smith the former Home secretary, lost her seat in the 2010 general election because of the expense scandal. However, even though AMS gives voters more representatives ( 1 MSP and 7 Regional) the role of the regional list MSP is obscure. To whom are they accountable? The Voters or their party? It is important to note that the party list MSP’s gives huge power to parties- they choose the names on the list and the order not the voters. This is particularly important as ‘loyalty points’ are often associated with Conservative ideology.
    In the event of an MP dying or resigning, by elections can be held under FTPT offering more choice for the voter. As the country is split into constituencies under FPTP the public can easily choose someone to replace an MP for their constituency. For example, Ian Mckenzie, won the Inverclyde by election to the UK parliament following the death of Labour MP David Cairns in May 2011. Whereas, there is no by election facility for list MSP’s under the AMS. The party leadership decided the placing of candidates on the party list. If a list MSP resigns it is the next person on the list who takes up the seat. For example, when Conservative MSP Mary Scanlon stood down as a list MSP for the Highland and Island in 2006, David Petrie took up the seat as he was listed on the party list. This shows that voters have more choice that they representatives are under FPTP by elections.
    It could be argued that FPTP is more responsive to the will of the people as it usually produces a majority government. This means that the government can pass bills easily in the house of commons without any rebellion or over use of the whip system. Prior to 2010, the previous 7 elections had produced a decisive result. This is good as it provides a stable government and provides stability in terms of economy as many people know where they stand in terms of economy, taxation, interest rates and currency. However, a proportional system like AMS usually produces coalitons although this is not the case with the current SNP government in Scotland. However, there is a huge weakness associated with the threat of a coalition. For example, using the AMS system in the 2007 Scottish parliament election no party had a working majority. The liberal democrats refused to join SNP resulting in the SNP forming a minority government.
    The AMS could be seen is more responsive to the British people as ‘top up’ votes are used. The list MSP’s ‘top up’ the constituency MSP’s to make the result overall, within a region of approximately with the wishes of the electrocrate. For example, in the 2011, Scottish Parliamentary election Labour received 3 ‘top up’ MSP to reflect its level of support across the North east regions as it received 44,000 in the 2nd vote. Unlike this system, FPTP offers no prizes for coming second. In the 2010 Westminster election, UKIP received 900,000 votes, but received no seats using this system as there support was spread out throughout different constituencies.
    Thanks so much!
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    Is anyone using the 2013 England council elections as examples in an STV essay?
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    Anyone studying China?
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    (Original post by JackoGeddes)
    can someone please explain a government policies to reduce wealth and health inequalities? is this even a question?

    I know how to do one on poverty (wealth), like unemployment, low wages, gender, race, age.

    health is diet, exercise, smoking, drinking then you could talk about health inequalities between gender/race/age

    can you get a question on the two?
    i don't get that either
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    Does anyone need collectivist vs. individualist essay? I am typing it up now
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Does anyone need collectivist vs. individualist essay? I am typing it up now
    meeeee!!
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    (Original post by Beccabarrow)
    meeeee!!
    Okay, I will send you it in your actual email give me like 25 minutes going to drown my self in red bull to help me live haha!
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    (Original post by Confused!)
    What are people predicting for China?
    This is what I'm looking for!! Have you heard anything yet?
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    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Does anyone need collectivist vs. individualist essay? I am typing it up now
    Me too!
 
 
 
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