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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    I can actually understand him a little, but there are plenty of opportunities in the industry that are client centric rather than sit at a screen all day or he could have just used the degree to get into something else.
    I don't think you understand either.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    You don't though, don't even try to BS for one minute that you think you do.

    Your definition was hacking into 'ancient computer systems' that has bugger all to do with modern day software engineering.

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    oh really, yawnnn
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    I don't think you understand either.
    Enlighten me then, o' wise one. Pretty much everyone in this industry at some point as thought about quitting it all for something more simple (I hear this every day). His reasoning is perfectly understandable, he doesn't like sitting in front of a screen and prefers interacting with people. He should have used his degree to do something else/done something different in the first place yeah but maybe he realized too late (loads of people do). Infact loads of people realize this and still work in this industry. Also you are describing supermarket checkouts as reptitive, yet coding is not. I'm beginning to get the impression you've either not been working for long or have never worked in this field before.
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    If you're complacent working in a checkout then fair dues to you, but for many of us that'd be worse than anything we could ever imagine.

    We've spent a lot of money on our degree and many of us have dreams, big dreams. Mine is to one day own a software company, at the very least I want to work in a top firm because otherwise I feel I am wasting my potential.

    I am sorry if I offended you with my comments, they were insensitive, I do think though that you should really think about if you want to work in a checkout for the rest of your life.... I'm pretty sure you're better than that
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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    Enlighten me then, o' wise one. Pretty much everyone in this industry at some point as thought about quitting it all for something more simple (I hear this every day). His reasoning is perfectly understandable, he doesn't like sitting in front of a screen and prefers interacting with people. He should have used his degree to do something else/done something different in the first place yeah but maybe he realized too late (loads of people do). Infact loads of people realize this and still work in this industry. Also you are describing supermarket checkouts as reptitive, yet coding is not. I'm beginning to get the impression you've either not been working for long or have never worked in this field before.
    Just for some insight, I am in the industry and I can tell you the last thing coding is, is repetitive, coding is problem solving at a high level constantly, it's constant problem solving and very mind intensive. I come home absolutely shattered mentally but I love it because It's a career, i'm getting better every day and I'm learning more each day about the art that is coding.

    I think comparing a degree in software engineering to a checkout is a massive stretch. It's not easy, but it's high paid. My managers get paid upwards of 60k and they do basically what I do, they just have more experience, you can have a very comfortable life as a programmer, it's a rewarding career.

    I understand why people wouldn't want to stare at a screen all day, but in most white collar jobs they're going to be doing that anyway, at least in coding often what you're doing is so highly technical your non-coder managers have no idea what how you do works and you can pace yourself and even chill and waste time. It's in bad taste and I'd not recommend going over the top, but I spend a fair amount of my time just chilling at work because I'm a good software architect and therefore I can make the required components very easily with a lot of free time.
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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    Enlighten me then, o' wise one. Pretty much everyone in this industry at some point as thought about quitting it all for something more simple (I hear this every day). His reasoning is perfectly understandable, he doesn't like sitting in front of a screen and prefers interacting with people. He should have used his degree to do something else/done something different in the first place yeah but maybe he realized too late (loads of people do). Infact loads of people realize this and still work in this industry. Also you are describing supermarket checkouts as reptitive, yet coding is not. I'm beginning to get the impression you've either not been working for long or have never worked in this field before.
    Coding involves more skill, more thought, more creativity and maybe a tiny bit more intelligence to do well. You've clearly never even opened an IDE.

    Computer science... Computers... Screens... The link is quite obvious.

    Again using some concocted statistics won't help make your point any more truthful.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Buyers remorse with law degrees. I did a law degree with the OU years ago. Big waste of four years of my spare time!!

    Good alternative? Thought about supply chain management, procurement, contract administration?
    Thank you.

    I am going to look into the above. I regret my law degree. I wish I k ew what I wanted to do when I was 18
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    If you're complacent working in a checkout then fair dues to you, but for many of us that'd be worse than anything we could ever imagine.

    We've spent a lot of money on our degree and many of us have dreams, big dreams. Mine is to one day own a software company, at the very least I want to work in a top firm because otherwise I feel I am wasting my potential.

    I am sorry if I offended you with my comments, they were insensitive, I do think though that you should really think about if you want to work in a checkout for the rest of your life.... I'm pretty sure you're better than that
    What sort of company do you work for?
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    (Original post by Silly_Monkey)
    Thank you.

    I am going to look into the above. I regret my law degree. I wish I k ew what I wanted to do when I was 18
    I wouldn't worry about it. Not many people truly do know what they want to do when they're 18. You've got plenty of time to add more qualifications and evolve in other directions.

    I started out in construction management but later on I picked up an OU law degree, (never found it very useful) became a Chartered Quantity Surveyor (membership void because I haven't paid my yearly fees in years!) briefly trained as an osteopath (quit that), trained in theology and became an ordained deacon (quit that), got certified as an Arbitrator (never practiced though), spent time as a volunteer water engineer in Guatemala (short stint), worked in a home for street kids (even shorter stint!), did a course in gemology (ironically not enough money to be made in diamonds) joined the TA (loathed it and left as soon as I could)

    I always ended up coming back to construction management - seems to be what I'm best at and I guess this is my destiny - but I've certainly had a lot of fun trying out different things for size.

    My point is that your law degree isn't going to define who you are or what you do or can do for the rest of your life!
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Just for some insight, I am in the industry and I can tell you the last thing coding is, is repetitive, coding is problem solving at a high level constantly, it's constant problem solving and very mind intensive. I come home absolutely shattered mentally but I love it because It's a career, i'm getting better every day and I'm learning more each day about the art that is coding.

    I think comparing a degree in software engineering to a checkout is a massive stretch. It's not easy, but it's high paid. My managers get paid upwards of 60k and they do basically what I do, they just have more experience, you can have a very comfortable life as a programmer, it's a rewarding career.

    I understand why people wouldn't want to stare at a screen all day, but in most white collar jobs they're going to be doing that anyway, at least in coding often what you're doing is so highly technical your non-coder managers have no idea what how you do works and you can pace yourself and even chill and waste time. It's in bad taste and I'd not recommend going over the top, but I spend a fair amount of my time just chilling at work because I'm a good software architect and therefore I can make the required components very easily with a lot of free time.
    That's awesome and some of what you say is correct but you're just in the industry. I've been in it for 6 years and am now a senior architect. Also as someone who is also earning 60,000 + a 15% bonus on top. I can tell you the difference in cost is well justified. A junior dev almost never contributes a net profit to a company.

    The more specialized you go the more this rings true, also developers generally don't architect frameworks and deal with the requirements elicitations and whatnot/generally have very minimal input.
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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    That's awesome and some of what you say is correct but you're just in the industry. I've been in it for 6 years and am now a senior architect. Also as someone who is also earning 60,000 + a 15% bonus on top. I can tell you the difference in cost is well justified. A junior dev almost never contributes a net profit to a company.

    The more specialized you go the more this rings true, also developers generally don't architect frameworks and deal with the requirements elicitations and whatnot/generally have very minimal input.
    See this ladies and gentlemen, in 6 years you can look at earning 60k from programming.

    I'm excited for life now, cheers.

    Yeah Juniors don't really do much of the heavy lifting, the pay gap is totally justified, besides, coding is a highly skilled thing, I think this is something people forget, the world NEEDS coders, and there's so few of them, and it's something that will always remain few because not a lot of poeple have the resolve or patience, or even time to become good enough to be professional coders. And even if you are good, the people who have years on your, (like you do on me) are far more valuable to a company because of their specialization
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    See this ladies and gentlemen, in 6 years you can look at earning 60k from programming.

    I'm excited for life now, cheers.

    Yeah Juniors don't really do much of the heavy lifting, the pay gap is totally justified, besides, coding is a highly skilled thing, I think this is something people forget, the world NEEDS coders, and there's so few of them, and it's something that will always remain few because not a lot of poeple have the resolve or patience, or even time to become good enough to be professional coders. And even if you are good, the people who have years on your, (like you do on me) are far more valuable to a company because of their specialization
    One of my cousins was a programmer for a blue chip company headed his own department earned well over 100k per year. Left to open a coffee shop, just didn't want to do it any more. He's moved to Canada now and set up a day care with his wife (kids).

    I would never glamorize such a career path, it is what it is.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    One of my cousins was a programmer for a blue chip company headed his own department earned well over 100k per year. Left to open a coffee shop, just didn't want to do it any more. He's moved to Canada now and set up a day care with his wife (kids).

    I would never glamorize such a career path, it is what it is.
    Some of us have other dreams, It wouldn't matter my salary, even if it was 1m per year, I'd probably leave to start my own thing one day, it's my dream to have my own software company.
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    Surely if the OP didn't like programming then he could just do something a bit more client facing, like being an IT consultant, or moving into academia? :confused:
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    Surely if the OP didn't like programming then he could just do something a bit more client facing, like being an IT consultant, or moving into academia? :confused:
    I've suggested this as well as project management and business anlalysis i dont know why everyone in this thread seems to think you cant have a healthy IT career without programming.
    part of me thinks the thread starter is trolling because he doesnt respond to legitamte advice only people who are critizing him
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I wouldn't worry about it. Not many people truly do know what they want to do when they're 18. You've got plenty of time to add more qualifications and evolve in other directions.

    I started out in construction management but later on I picked up an OU law degree, (never found it very useful) became a Chartered Quantity Surveyor (membership void because I haven't paid my yearly fees in years!) briefly trained as an osteopath (quit that), trained in theology and became an ordained deacon (quit that), got certified as an Arbitrator (never practiced though), spent time as a volunteer water engineer in Guatemala (short stint), worked in a home for street kids (even shorter stint!), did a course in gemology (ironically not enough money to be made in diamonds) joined the TA (loathed it and left as soon as I could)

    I always ended up coming back to construction management - seems to be what I'm best at and I guess this is my destiny - but I've certainly had a lot of fun trying out different things for size.

    My point is that your law degree isn't going to define who you are or what you do or can do for the rest of your life!
    Wow. I was thinking of joining the army or something as I loathe law. I will look into supply chain, procurement etc... But some of them ask for engineering or maths experience.
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    Aren't jobs in computer science/ IT increasing and will continue to increase?
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    (Original post by CosmicAero)
    Aren't jobs in computer science/ IT increasing and will continue to increase?
    Unis don't teach you to write code which actually gets you employed. CS degrees are usually very generalist.

    Also the employment rate for lower rated unis is much lower because the courses are less good.
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    I do agree there with the low Unis but there are other jobs you can get in the field of computer science without that much coding. Though a large chunk is coding I think computer science being a wide field is a benefit as there are a variety of different types of jobs
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    Unis don't teach you to write code which actually gets you employed. CS degrees are usually very generalist.

    Also the employment rate for lower rated unis is much lower because the courses are less good.
    By lower rated unis, what do you mean?

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