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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    Out of interest, does anyone know what the salary is like for STP positions in London?
    Depends on where in London.


    The STP is band 6, which currently starts at £26,041 a year (although this could go up in April). Inner London gets an extra 20% and outer London gets 15%, so you'd be on £31,249 or £29,947 respectively.
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    (Original post by k3ro)
    Thanks for this. I've signed up to go to a med phys open day in Wirral. Bit of a trek (currently in Newcastle) but hopefully it'll be worth it. It's an entire day (10-4) even without any stuff regarding application tips etc so I hope they'll give tips for the interviews.
    There are open days after the submission date? The timing feels strange, most of the info you get at them is useful for the application (particularly the question where it asks "Describe what actions you have undertaken to increase your knowledge, experience and understanding of healthcare science and the training programme for your chosen specialism".
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    (Original post by alex83)
    Depends on where in London.


    The STP is band 6, which currently starts at £26,041 a year (although this could go up in April). Inner London gets an extra 20% and outer London gets 15%, so you'd be on £31,249 or £29,947 respectively.
    On Oriel it states: " Salary c. £25, 000 plus location allowance where applicable".
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    (Original post by greendragonfly)
    On Oriel it states: " Salary c. £25, 000 plus location allowance where applicable".
    Circa means approximately, so the band 6 salary mentioned is likely to be accurate.
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    (Original post by alex83)
    There are open days after the submission date? The timing feels strange, most of the info you get at them is useful for the application (particularly the question where it asks "Describe what actions you have undertaken to increase your knowledge, experience and understanding of healthcare science and the training programme for your chosen specialism".
    Yeah. There's a med phys one on the 23rd, aka this coming Tuesday.

    I asked the coordinator what would be involved and he sent me a schedule for the day. It involves an introduction to some of the topics in the med phys course, and also covers things such as electives, the student experience, and a couple of QA sessions. I suppose it will be very insightful and I'd like to ask a few questions, but yeah, I was also thinking if I get to interview they might ask why I never bothered going to an open day lmao.
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    (Original post by FUNEX?)
    that sucks, surely if it doesn't increase your salary then the Hospital won't have to pay any more, why wouldn't they want you to advance your training (other than it costing them more once you gain additional qualifications - but the threat of losing you because they're holding you back should be more worrisome to them!)?
    You would think so right? I think it's the fact they would have to let me attend lectures and I have a lot of work to cover as it is. Sadly I think there might be a bit of snobbery too as my degree isn't purely physics...
    Anyway I thought I best apply now before I have to take a bigger wage drop in the future if I wanted to do the stp
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    Guess this thread will be pretty quiet until everyone hears something in March. Just need to keep busy these next few weeks so we don't go mad!
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    My friend received an alert about location preference. He tried to select something but then it went to a blank page. He says it was a glitch but now I'm paranoid haha
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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    My friend received an alert about location preference. He tried to select something but then it went to a blank page. He says it was a glitch but now I'm paranoid haha
    If its like last year you only need to do location preference if you have been shortlisted or a reserve for interview
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    (Original post by MrB810)
    If its like last year you only need to do location preference if you have been shortlisted or a reserve for interview
    Yes it was odd that he would receive an alert now though since it's not meant to be until March. But he couldn't actually select anything, hence why he hoped it was a good sign but maybe just a mistake.
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    Hi all,

    I applied for the STP and have been longlisted (for genomics and genomic counselling), however I am pretty much resigned to the fact that I won't get an interview (a lot of the person spec wasn't in my application).

    I am currently a Biology teacher and am frantically trying to get out of education and into healthcare. I have been looking for other jobs in healthcare/scientific fields but am coming up blank for any that I have the relevant qualifications for.

    I came on here because I know a lot of you are currently working in lab/healthcare environments, and so I thought I'd ask your advice. What jobs do you do and how did you find/get into them?

    Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated, I can't even begin to explain how desperate I am to get out of teaching and into healthcare, and kicking myself that I didn't go down the healthcare route in the first place isn't doing any good!!!

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    (Original post by <Ryan>)
    Well the term healthcare covers such a huge number of disciplines, I think you need to narrow down the fields that you are particularly interested in. For example, I'm a paramedic. Is that something you'd be interested in, or would you prefer a job in a clinic or a lab? Think about what you really want. For example, do you want to study the brain, the heart, infectious diseases, the body as a whole? Try not to rush into something just to get away from your current job. Starting a new career based solely on meeting the essential personal specs doesn't seem like a very good idea to me. It may take you a while to gain the relevant qualifications for your dream job, but it would be worth it in the end.
    Thank you for your reply - I definitely want to work in a patient facing role, hence why genetic counseling is my first choice. The prospect of linking my love for science and for helping people (however cheesy) is what drove me to it. I applied for the job because I know it's what I want to do and I know I would be really good at it - however because I don't meet the lab-based sections of the person spec I know I will be unlikely to get in (even though I won't be primarily lab based!) Ideally I am looking for a job that will build my experience so that I can reapply to the STP next year. But I might have to hold out and wait (even though my school have put an advert in for my job already - which isn't helping the stress!!) Thank you for the advice though, the last point in particular has resonated I know that short term misery will be worth it for long term happiness haha!!
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    Hi

    I have applied for the same stream as you, and have really looked into how to get into genetics (my main love).
    Why haven't you considered applying to genetic counselling msc? I think it is only available at manchester and cardiff. That is the standard route into genetic counselling and people from various disciplines get in. The STP program is looking for scientists, and unusually opened a genetic counselling route. so the entry requirements are high and the competition is fierce.. for the GC masters you don't do the aptitude tests etc. Its 2 years unpaid vs 3 years paid STP so that is missions but ...

    Also, they are a university course which means that they provide all information ie you can speak to the admissions team and get proper feedback and try get yourself as prepared as possible to get in. Whereas the STP admissions team is a totally different situation.

    If its any comfort - my a level bio teacher did the GC Msc and has recently graduated so there is hope! She applied while she was teaching...

    And i know this is often said, but work experience is the best way forward - to help narrow down what you want to do.. Personally i did a lot of varied work experience, all in patient contact roles, but only very recently came to my conclusions. For example, only on GC work exp did i see the variation and now i know specifically in the field what i would want to do. Get as much as you can! Speak to everyone possible.. its attractive to employers if you have a very clear image of what you want
    BESt of luck!!
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    (Original post by Sarahtoninx)
    Hi all,

    I applied for the STP and have been longlisted (for genomics and genomic counselling), however I am pretty much resigned to the fact that I won't get an interview (a lot of the person spec wasn't in my application).

    I am currently a Biology teacher and am frantically trying to get out of education and into healthcare. I have been looking for other jobs in healthcare/scientific fields but am coming up blank for any that I have the relevant qualifications for.

    I came on here because I know a lot of you are currently working in lab/healthcare environments, and so I thought I'd ask your advice. What jobs do you do and how did you find/get into them?

    Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated, I can't even begin to explain how desperate I am to get out of teaching and into healthcare, and kicking myself that I didn't go down the healthcare route in the first place isn't doing any good!!!

    Hey there,

    First of all - don't give up hope on the STP - I'm sure you will have done fine!

    I am also a former Biology teacher who has escaped education (after 1 year teaching). And also kicking myself about not going for lab work/ healthcare route sooner.

    I left at the end of a fixed term contract so I was slightly different in that I was out of work for about 6 months after teaching. I applied for a lot of jobs in that time leading up to me leaving and after I left but was not getting many interviews - I think mainly because I didn't have any lab experience (apart form undergrad work) which seemed to be key for most jobs. I eventually got an entry level job at a Clinical Research Unit as a lab technician - although it is basic and was a large pay cut I was promoted within 6 months and have been given a lot of extra responsibility quickly. Overall it has given me the vital lab experience but also loads of other skills which will be beneficial for me when I look for future lab jobs.

    There are many places to look for jobs: University websites, NHS jobs, normal job websites (Monster, Reed etc.) so have a look round, I found mine on indeed.

    Also the application for teaching jobs is quite different to most jobs so I used the National Careers Service to help me improve my CV as I hadn't needed one when applying for teaching posts.

    I had to take a pay cut, but it wasn't a problem as I didn't have any financial obligations. I would suggest you open yourself up to this as some lab jobs don't pay the best and also you may have to start low down just so you can get the experience of working in a lab that a lot of jobs want you to have.

    I hope this helps you even a little bit. If you want to ask me any more questions feel free to message me!
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    (Original post by MrB810)
    Hey there,

    First of all - don't give up hope on the STP - I'm sure you will have done fine!

    I am also a former Biology teacher who has escaped education (after 1 year teaching). And also kicking myself about not going for lab work/ healthcare route sooner.

    I left at the end of a fixed term contract so I was slightly different in that I was out of work for about 6 months after teaching. I applied for a lot of jobs in that time leading up to me leaving and after I left but was not getting many interviews - I think mainly because I didn't have any lab experience (apart form undergrad work) which seemed to be key for most jobs. I eventually got an entry level job at a Clinical Research Unit as a lab technician - although it is basic and was a large pay cut I was promoted within 6 months and have been given a lot of extra responsibility quickly. Overall it has given me the vital lab experience but also loads of other skills which will be beneficial for me when I look for future lab jobs.

    There are many places to look for jobs: University websites, NHS jobs, normal job websites (Monster, Reed etc.) so have a look round, I found mine on indeed.

    Also the application for teaching jobs is quite different to most jobs so I used the National Careers Service to help me improve my CV as I hadn't needed when when applying for teaching posts.

    I had to take a pay cut, but it wasn't a problem as I didn't have any financial obligations. I would suggest you open yourself up to this as some lab jobs don't pay the best and also you may have to start low down just so you can get the experience of working in a lab that a lot of jobs want you to have.

    I hope this helps you even a little bit. If you want to ask me any more questions feel free to message me!
    It's comforting to know that there are some teachers out there who desire different career paths, and it's not all roses and sunshine like some of my old university acquaintances make out when they took it up. I want to throw a fit every time someone suggests to me 'become a teacher' because of a nice salary and to right the wrongs I experienced during my dreadful secondary education. I respect teachers and understand you have to really want to dedicate yourself to be a good one. But frankly I hated school and have no desire to go back, even if I can't get a scientific job.
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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    It's comforting to know that there are some teachers out there who desire different career paths, and it's not all roses and sunshine like some of my old university acquaintances make out when they took it up. I want to throw a fit every time someone suggests to me 'become a teacher' because of a nice salary and to right the wrongs I experienced during my dreadful secondary education. I respect teachers and understand you have to really want to dedicate yourself to be a good one. But frankly I hated school and have no desire to go back, even if I can't get a scientific job.
    I would never suggest going into teaching to somebody but at the same time I wouldn't discourage anyone who wanted to, although I would tell them my story (the good and the bad) and tell them to get experience and think about it long and hard. You should only go into it because you want to not because it sounds good. Whilst the pay sounds good - when your working all day every day with little rest its not worth it especially when it is affecting your health.
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    Here is a list of shortlisting criteria for stp. Hope this helps
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc shortlisting scoring for STPfinal (2) (1).doc (137.0 KB, 266 views)
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    (Original post by sharpsri)
    Here is a list of shortlisting criteria for stp. Hope this helps
    I get confused as to the degree requirements. I'm pretty sure when posts are advertised, the NSHCS says those with a 2.2 plus an MSc or PhD can apply, but shortlisting criteria states you absolutely need a First or Upper Second, with a second degree (assuming postgraduate) is desirable. Which is it?! I was told by a consultant in Clinical Biochemistry to still apply even if I had mixed grades since passion for science and commitment to the NHS is more important. But I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time if it doesn't even meet the shortlisting criteria. :'(

    Also is all of this including full descriptions of referenced works by candidates, calibrating equipment, troubleshooting, IT skills etc meant to be taken from the application form before interview? I don't see how everything could have been included given the strict word limit.
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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    I get confused as to the degree requirements. I'm pretty sure when posts are advertised, the NSHCS says those with a 2.2 plus an MSc or PhD can apply, but shortlisting criteria states you absolutely need a First or Upper Second, with a second degree (assuming postgraduate) is desirable. Which is it?! I was told by a consultant in Clinical Biochemistry to still apply even if I had mixed grades since passion for science and commitment to the NHS is more important. But I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time if it doesn't even meet the shortlisting criteria. :'(

    Also is all of this including full descriptions of referenced works by candidates, calibrating equipment, troubleshooting, IT skills etc meant to be taken from the application form before interview? I don't see how everything could have been included given the strict word limit.
    Yeah I was just thinking of the same - it would have been IMPOSSIBLE to include full descriptions of all of them parts; surely ability to calibrate equipment etc. are best to test in an interview rather than cram into a short application form.
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    (Original post by sharpsri)
    Here is a list of shortlisting criteria for stp. Hope this helps
    That's amazing, thank you. It helps to get a picture of what they want at least for next year, if this year doesn't work out 😀
 
 
 
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