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Current Year 12 Thread Mark I (2013-2014) Watch

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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    To be fair that's most likely due to the fairly terrible standards of pre-16 education making most students unprepared for A Levels. They only need to make it a bit better, it's not even that bad.

    Having said that, Fish doesn't understand the plights of the less capable very well :mmm:

    (I hope that was phrased in as least an insulting way as possible.)
    :rofl:

    That was mean!
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    Ah okay. I wasn't judging, again, I was just confused given the previously attested rigour of the IB.
    We started with complex numbers... not sure what order my teacher's following but we're not doing any calculus at all until this summer so ._.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    :rofl:

    That was mean!
    (Kind of accurate)

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    (Original post by Obiejess)
    (Kind of accurate)

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    I didn't say otherwise not that I'm saying it either.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I didn't say otherwise not that I'm saying it either.
    Yeah well, you don't.
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    Yeah well, you don't.
    I do, I just don't see why they're like that.

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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Which a levels?

    Geography is a complete joke (I think you do it, no offence) and I dropped it because it was just too easy and dull.

    And to think it's a respected one.
    I find geography pretty easy too - not much of a step up from GCSE. But I've heard that it gets a lot harder when you move onto A2...
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    I pissed off a royalist by complaining that I would have to swear allegiance to a monarchy I detest to become a UK citizen :mmm:
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    (Original post by Georgiecat)
    I find geography pretty easy too - not much of a step up from GCSE. But I've heard that it gets a lot harder when you move onto A2...
    I would hope so!
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I would hope so!
    Sadly, I plan to drop it at the end of AS, but ah well. What subjects are you taking again?

    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    To be fair that's most likely due to the fairly terrible standards of pre-16 education making most students unprepared for A Levels. They only need to make it a bit better, it's not even that bad.

    Having said that, Fish doesn't understand the plights of the less capable very well :mmm:

    (I hope that was phrased in as least an insulting way as possible.)
    That's somewhat true, but you have to remember we spend our lives on a forum dedicated to studying - most of us are going to be pretty academically capable. Some people, even people who got pretty high grades at GCSE, do find A levels really, really difficult.
    *unpopular opinion time* I think pre-16 education isn't actually that bad, given its purpose - to educate everyone, regardless of academic ability, to a reasonable standard. GCSEs are General Certificates of Secondary Education - they're meant to show that you were educated to secondary level. If I were Mr Gove, I'd make students sit the equivalent of GCSEs - but at a very slightly lower level - in year 10, and then they could spend year 11 bridging the gap between GCSE and A level.
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    (Original post by Georgiecat)
    Sadly, I plan to drop it at the end of AS, but ah well. What subjects are you taking again?



    That's somewhat true, but you have to remember we spend our lives on a forum dedicated to studying - most of us are going to be pretty academically capable. Some people, even people who got pretty high grades at GCSE, do find A levels really, really difficult.
    *unpopular opinion time* I think pre-16 education isn't actually that bad, given its purpose - to educate everyone, regardless of academic ability, to a reasonable standard. GCSEs are General Certificates of Secondary Education - they're meant to show that you were educated to secondary level. If I were Mr Gove, I'd make students sit the equivalent of GCSEs - but at a very slightly lower level - in year 10, and then they could spend year 11 bridging the gap between GCSE and A level.
    We also need more ability orientated schooling. Even Grammar Schools. :yep:

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    (Original post by Obiejess)
    We also need more ability orientated schooling. Even Grammar Schools. :yep:

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    I'm quite dubious of grammar schools. They effectively hinge on students wanting to be academically successful at the start of their careers. I was pretty ambivalent towards education before say, Year 10, although I was always academically capable. But there are people who only show ability when they show effort. It wouldn't be fair.
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    I'm quite dubious of grammar schools. They effectively hinge on students wanting to be academically successful at the start of their careers. I was pretty ambivalent towards education before say, Year 10, although I was always academically capable. But there are people who only show ability when they show effort. It wouldn't be fair.
    I agree the system would need to be altered and there would be a need for more flexibility but I think it's a good concept

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    (Original post by Obiejess)
    I agree the system would need to be altered and there would be a need for more flexibility but I think it's a good concept

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    How flexible though? Not flexible enough, and there won't be enough opportunities for changeover. Students will change their attitudes at different times, probably not coinciding with any designated changeover opportunities. But make it so flexible that one could change at any time and there would be so many administrative and bureaucratic problems it's not funny.

    Then you have space requirements. What if there are no spaces left in a grammar school for an exceptional student whose attitude has changed?
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    (Original post by Georgiecat)
    Sadly, I plan to drop it at the end of AS, but ah well. What subjects are you taking again?



    That's somewhat true, but you have to remember we spend our lives on a forum dedicated to studying - most of us are going to be pretty academically capable. Some people, even people who got pretty high grades at GCSE, do find A levels really, really difficult.
    *unpopular opinion time* I think pre-16 education isn't actually that bad, given its purpose - to educate everyone, regardless of academic ability, to a reasonable standard. GCSEs are General Certificates of Secondary Education - they're meant to show that you were educated to secondary level. If I were Mr Gove, I'd make students sit the equivalent of GCSEs - but at a very slightly lower level - in year 10, and then they could spend year 11 bridging the gap between GCSE and A level.
    The three sciences and French! and f maths to be.

    French is by far the hardest!
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    HEY GUYS! How is everyone? All pumped for Christmas???? (Yes I'm excited now it's not too early any more) ^-^
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    The three sciences and French! and f maths to be.

    French is by far the hardest!
    Ah, very nice

    (Original post by Obiejess)
    We also need more ability orientated schooling. Even Grammar Schools. :yep:

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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    I'm quite dubious of grammar schools. They effectively hinge on students wanting to be academically successful at the start of their careers. I was pretty ambivalent towards education before say, Year 10, although I was always academically capable. But there are people who only show ability when they show effort. It wouldn't be fair.
    As a grammar school student myself, I'm also pretty sceptical about them - for one, all the "good" teachers seem to end up teaching at grammar schools, and I'm very much against the quality of education you get depending upon your academic ability (or anything else, for that matter). There's also pressure put on you to get high grades - often unattainably high grades - and even when you're be in the top 10% of the population academically, you're made to feel stupid for getting a B, or even an A. This isn't necessarily deliberate, it's just a side effect of putting a lot of teenagers of similarly high academic intelligence in a building together.
    Oh, and there's also the fact that you're only taught to achieve in a very specific environment - once you go to uni or get a job, you're going to be working with a variety of different people, and there are a lot of people in my school who genuinely can't explain a relatively simple concept (e.g. how the lungs work, or how to balance an equation, or how to write French in the past tense) in simple terms.
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    (Original post by Georgiecat)
    Oh, and there's also the fact that you're only taught to achieve in a very specific environment - once you go to uni or get a job, you're going to be working with a variety of different people, and there are a lot of people in my school who genuinely can't explain a relatively simple concept (e.g. how the lungs work, or how to balance an equation, or how to write French in the past tense) in simple terms.
    An independent grammar school Sixth Form student here.

    I think what you describe is more of an effect of the 'exam factory' culture that some schools have rather than specifically grammar schools. Even now, my teachers say 'it's all about the exam technique; getting you the most marks' which is fine in their context, but when you think about it... is this really a good education?

    Also, I'll climb on the bandwagon that says Fish doesn't understand the plight of the less capable.
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    (Original post by NikolaT)
    Also, I'll climb on the bandwagon that says Fish doesn't understand the plight of the less capable.
    I'll climb on too
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    (Original post by Georgiecat)
    Ah, very nice





    As a grammar school student myself, I'm also pretty sceptical about them - for one, all the "good" teachers seem to end up teaching at grammar schools, and I'm very much against the quality of education you get depending upon your academic ability (or anything else, for that matter). There's also pressure put on you to get high grades - often unattainably high grades - and even when you're be in the top 10% of the population academically, you're made to feel stupid for getting a B, or even an A. This isn't necessarily deliberate, it's just a side effect of putting a lot of teenagers of similarly high academic intelligence in a building together.
    Oh, and there's also the fact that you're only taught to achieve in a very specific environment - once you go to uni or get a job, you're going to be working with a variety of different people, and there are a lot of people in my school who genuinely can't explain a relatively simple concept (e.g. how the lungs work, or how to balance an equation, or how to write French in the past tense) in simple terms.
    I guess that this is very true.
 
 
 
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