Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    Me too!
    Send you it when i start typing it up if you could send me any essays would be good too!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Okay, I will send you it in your actual email give me like 25 minutes going to drown my self in red bull to help me live haha!
    thank you so much! i'm comfort eating for this exam so so scared!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone have any idea how many blacks depend on welfare in the USA compared to whites?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Okay, I will send you it in your actual email give me like 25 minutes going to drown my self in red bull to help me live haha!
    have you got any social/wealth inequalities essay yet for wealth and health? thanks
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    OK so i'm pretty happy if: AMS v FPTP comes up or "To what extent does media influence the outcome of elections". Devolution, Scottish representation at WM and success/failures of SP. For section B lifestyle choices limiting good health more than any other factor, collectivist v individualist, for Africa, NGO and conflict limiting development and for America, the American Dream and Ethnic minorities influencing elections. Still got 2 days for a few more so pretty good at this point
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What's everyone doing next year after we all (hopefully) pass Moddies?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nicolagrantgrant)
    Does anyone need collectivist vs. individualist essay? I am typing it up now
    Me please!!!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madmissi)
    What's everyone doing next year after we all (hopefully) pass Moddies?
    Yeah, definitely needing some serious finger crossing for this exam!


    I'm doing Geography (higher) and History, RMPS and Maths (adv higher)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madmissi)
    What's everyone doing next year after we all (hopefully) pass Moddies?
    AH German
    AH French
    AH History
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    AH German
    AH French
    AH History

    TWO
    Modern Languages at AH :eek:

    Jings, that's brave!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hendycfc)
    Big question here for development in Africa.

    What do people think the question will be between

    Political factors influencing development in Africa
    Social factors influencing development in Africa
    Economic factors influencing development in Africa
    ‘Economic issues are the most important factors affecting development in Africa.’ Discuss (Basically any question like this where you compare all three, political, social and economic in one essay)
    Effectiveness of UN in Africa
    Effectiveness of NGOs in Africa

    What do people think are the two most likely as I've seen all mentioned?
    Would anyone be able to answer this question?

    and also would anyone be able to tell me differences between to what extent have ethnic minorities in the USA made social and economic progress and the American Dream question?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Supertwadds)

    TWO
    Modern Languages at AH :eek:

    Jings, that's brave!
    I want to do languages, spefically German and Russian (perhaps with history) at uni, so it's quite fitting
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Adv English, H politics, H art and H geography if i pass everything else :/!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Critically examine the success of government policies to reduce poverty. I got 13/15 on this essay, so thought it might be useful

    It is said that approximately 17% of the population are found to be in poverty at any one time consistently, and so it is important that there are a number of government policies that exist to reduce poverty in the UK. Among the most affected by poverty are children, pensioners, and the low-paid and unemployed. A range of policies exist in order to reduce poverty amongst these groups, such as Working Tax Credits, National Minimum Wage, The New Deal, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, albeit with varying success.
    There are several government policies that exist in order to reduce poverty amongst children in the UK, the main one being Working Tax Credit which is integrated with the Child Tax Credit. For example, reports have revealed that tax credits have enabled 40% of single mothers to escape from poverty, meaning that many children no longer have to suffer the effects of poverty as a result of the implementation of both WTC and CTC. Further highlighting the success of tax credits in the UK, 2012 statistics from the Department of Work and Pensions have stated that child poverty reduced dramatically between 1998/1999 to 2010/2012, with approximately 1.1 million children in the UK being lifted out of poverty, a reduction that was credited to government policies such as WTC and CTC that worked to increase the level of benefits available to both lone parents and two-parent families. Although government policies have had some success in reducing child poverty in the UK, there is still progress that needs to be made. In 1999, when child poverty sat at approximately 3.4 million children, Labour set itself the task of halving child poverty by 2010 and eliminating it by 2020. Government failed to reach its target and instead saw an increase to an estimated 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK in 2012. The sudden increase can be attributed to the on-going economic crisis in the UK which has plunged many more families closer and under the poverty line due to a lack of jobs, frozen pay, increased living costs and spending cuts. Furthermore, under current government policy child poverty is expected to rise with an expected 300,000 more children living in poverty by 2015/2016 and an estimated 4.2 million children living in poverty by 2020. While it is obvious that Working Tax Credits and Child Tax Credits have displayed some success, the current economic crisis has limited that further success and in turn resulted in a rise in child poverty.
    Poverty amongst pensioners is a big concern in the UK, with British pensioners being among Europe’s poorest, and so there are several government policies that aim to reduce poverty for the elderly, namely Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, both of which have helped to reduce poverty amongst the UK’s pensioners. Everyone in the UK is entitled to a state pension, however Pension Credit is an additional payment which boosts the income of UK pensioners living on a low income. Winter Fuel Payments are a one-off annual payment which is used to help reduce fuel poverty and other health problems associated with this. Pension Credits and the Winter Fuel Payments have seen some success since their implementation, with a drop of 700,000 pensioners living in poverty from 1997 to 2005, however since then little progress has been made. Reports have revealed that 9/10 pensioners are aware of the benefits that they are entitled to yet only 2/10 claim their benefits. This could be due to a lack of awareness, a lack of understanding regarding the process of claiming benefits or simply down to the fact that they are reluctant to ask for help, all of these reasons being limitations on the success of the government policies in place which are meant to benefit pensioners. Further highlighting the unsuccessfulness of policies such as Pension Credits are statistics which reveal that 1 in 6 pensioners, approximately 1.8 million, were living in poverty in the UK in 2011, with 1.2 million pensioners living on the edge of poverty. Like the policies in place to aid in reducing child poverty, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments displayed initial success, however there are still many pensioners in the UK living in, or on the edge of poverty, and thus it can only be concluded that Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments have displayed limited success.
    Those who are unemployed and those who are low-paid are another group that can easily fall into poverty in the UK and so there are several government policies in place to prevent that happening, two of them being the New Deal and National Minimum Wage. The New Deal is the Government’s central policy for helping the unemployed into employment through various schemes, whereas NMW aims to remove the problem of poverty pay. It has been reported that NMW has helped to increase the income of over 1 million workers, 75% of whom are women. In April 2013, NMW was raised to £6.31 for those aged 20 and above, to £5.05 for those aged 18-20 and to £3.72 for those aged 16-17, and reports suggest that approximately 1 million workers benefit annually from the rise in NMW. The New Deal has also seen success; since its implementation it has moved approximately 1.8 million off of benefits and into employment and in Scotland, 78% of the long-term unemployed amongst young people moved into sustained jobs. It has been proven that people who live in households where at least one person is unemployed account for 40% of those living in poverty, meaning that government policies like the New Deal and NMW are vital in preventing poverty and the problems that can arise as a result of that. The combination of the New Deal and NMW has helped to increase the employment rate by an average of 2.5%, showing that both policies have been successful to some extent; however as with all the previously mentioned government policies, their success has been limited. Many complain that despite it rising with inflation, NMW is too low. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation identified the minimum standard of living to equate to an hourly pay rate of £7.38, yet in 2010 around 3.5 million workers were paid less than £7 per hour. Similarly, the New Deal has also seen some failings. More people have left the New Deal 25+ scheme and returned to claim Jobseekers Allowance than those who have gained employment and 2/5 people who manage to enter employment are back into unemployment within 6 months. In summary, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst the unemployed and low-paid have seen partial success.
    In conclusion, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst children, the elderly, and the unemployed and low-paid have been successful to some extent. Their partial success can be attributed to the economic crisis which the UK currently faces and which has been too powerful for government policy to counter.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Would anybody like to help me strike up a 'NGOs and African Development' essay plan. I have no idea what to write for this. The only NGO I really know is Water Aid, and then Save The Children and Oxfam aren't really mentioned in the marking scheme. Help please?! Could you private message or email me at [Removed - please use PMs or post here]?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ladymarshmallow)
    I want to do languages, spefically German and Russian (perhaps with history) at uni, so it's quite fitting
    Oh, it all makes sense then! :cool:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Louden69)
    This is what I'm looking for!! Have you heard anything yet?
    the average IQ has halved now your here... right jade revise in this order
    1. social and economic change
    2. opposition to the CCP
    3. human rights extended
    4. democracy improved
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by youjustburnkid)
    Critically examine the success of government policies to reduce poverty. I got 13/15 on this essay, so thought it might be useful

    It is said that approximately 17% of the population are found to be in poverty at any one time consistently, and so it is important that there are a number of government policies that exist to reduce poverty in the UK. Among the most affected by poverty are children, pensioners, and the low-paid and unemployed. A range of policies exist in order to reduce poverty amongst these groups, such as Working Tax Credits, National Minimum Wage, The New Deal, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, albeit with varying success.
    There are several government policies that exist in order to reduce poverty amongst children in the UK, the main one being Working Tax Credit which is integrated with the Child Tax Credit. For example, reports have revealed that tax credits have enabled 40% of single mothers to escape from poverty, meaning that many children no longer have to suffer the effects of poverty as a result of the implementation of both WTC and CTC. Further highlighting the success of tax credits in the UK, 2012 statistics from the Department of Work and Pensions have stated that child poverty reduced dramatically between 1998/1999 to 2010/2012, with approximately 1.1 million children in the UK being lifted out of poverty, a reduction that was credited to government policies such as WTC and CTC that worked to increase the level of benefits available to both lone parents and two-parent families. Although government policies have had some success in reducing child poverty in the UK, there is still progress that needs to be made. In 1999, when child poverty sat at approximately 3.4 million children, Labour set itself the task of halving child poverty by 2010 and eliminating it by 2020. Government failed to reach its target and instead saw an increase to an estimated 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK in 2012. The sudden increase can be attributed to the on-going economic crisis in the UK which has plunged many more families closer and under the poverty line due to a lack of jobs, frozen pay, increased living costs and spending cuts. Furthermore, under current government policy child poverty is expected to rise with an expected 300,000 more children living in poverty by 2015/2016 and an estimated 4.2 million children living in poverty by 2020. While it is obvious that Working Tax Credits and Child Tax Credits have displayed some success, the current economic crisis has limited that further success and in turn resulted in a rise in child poverty.
    Poverty amongst pensioners is a big concern in the UK, with British pensioners being among Europe’s poorest, and so there are several government policies that aim to reduce poverty for the elderly, namely Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, both of which have helped to reduce poverty amongst the UK’s pensioners. Everyone in the UK is entitled to a state pension, however Pension Credit is an additional payment which boosts the income of UK pensioners living on a low income. Winter Fuel Payments are a one-off annual payment which is used to help reduce fuel poverty and other health problems associated with this. Pension Credits and the Winter Fuel Payments have seen some success since their implementation, with a drop of 700,000 pensioners living in poverty from 1997 to 2005, however since then little progress has been made. Reports have revealed that 9/10 pensioners are aware of the benefits that they are entitled to yet only 2/10 claim their benefits. This could be due to a lack of awareness, a lack of understanding regarding the process of claiming benefits or simply down to the fact that they are reluctant to ask for help, all of these reasons being limitations on the success of the government policies in place which are meant to benefit pensioners. Further highlighting the unsuccessfulness of policies such as Pension Credits are statistics which reveal that 1 in 6 pensioners, approximately 1.8 million, were living in poverty in the UK in 2011, with 1.2 million pensioners living on the edge of poverty. Like the policies in place to aid in reducing child poverty, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments displayed initial success, however there are still many pensioners in the UK living in, or on the edge of poverty, and thus it can only be concluded that Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments have displayed limited success.
    Those who are unemployed and those who are low-paid are another group that can easily fall into poverty in the UK and so there are several government policies in place to prevent that happening, two of them being the New Deal and National Minimum Wage. The New Deal is the Government’s central policy for helping the unemployed into employment through various schemes, whereas NMW aims to remove the problem of poverty pay. It has been reported that NMW has helped to increase the income of over 1 million workers, 75% of whom are women. In April 2013, NMW was raised to £6.31 for those aged 20 and above, to £5.05 for those aged 18-20 and to £3.72 for those aged 16-17, and reports suggest that approximately 1 million workers benefit annually from the rise in NMW. The New Deal has also seen success; since its implementation it has moved approximately 1.8 million off of benefits and into employment and in Scotland, 78% of the long-term unemployed amongst young people moved into sustained jobs. It has been proven that people who live in households where at least one person is unemployed account for 40% of those living in poverty, meaning that government policies like the New Deal and NMW are vital in preventing poverty and the problems that can arise as a result of that. The combination of the New Deal and NMW has helped to increase the employment rate by an average of 2.5%, showing that both policies have been successful to some extent; however as with all the previously mentioned government policies, their success has been limited. Many complain that despite it rising with inflation, NMW is too low. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation identified the minimum standard of living to equate to an hourly pay rate of £7.38, yet in 2010 around 3.5 million workers were paid less than £7 per hour. Similarly, the New Deal has also seen some failings. More people have left the New Deal 25+ scheme and returned to claim Jobseekers Allowance than those who have gained employment and 2/5 people who manage to enter employment are back into unemployment within 6 months. In summary, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst the unemployed and low-paid have seen partial success.
    In conclusion, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst children, the elderly, and the unemployed and low-paid have been successful to some extent. Their partial success can be attributed to the economic crisis which the UK currently faces and which has been too powerful for government policy to counter.

    thank you so much! have you got a social and economic one for health and wealth?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by youjustburnkid)
    Critically examine the success of government policies to reduce poverty. I got 13/15 on this essay, so thought it might be useful

    It is said that approximately 17% of the population are found to be in poverty at any one time consistently, and so it is important that there are a number of government policies that exist to reduce poverty in the UK. Among the most affected by poverty are children, pensioners, and the low-paid and unemployed. A range of policies exist in order to reduce poverty amongst these groups, such as Working Tax Credits, National Minimum Wage, The New Deal, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, albeit with varying success.
    There are several government policies that exist in order to reduce poverty amongst children in the UK, the main one being Working Tax Credit which is integrated with the Child Tax Credit. For example, reports have revealed that tax credits have enabled 40% of single mothers to escape from poverty, meaning that many children no longer have to suffer the effects of poverty as a result of the implementation of both WTC and CTC. Further highlighting the success of tax credits in the UK, 2012 statistics from the Department of Work and Pensions have stated that child poverty reduced dramatically between 1998/1999 to 2010/2012, with approximately 1.1 million children in the UK being lifted out of poverty, a reduction that was credited to government policies such as WTC and CTC that worked to increase the level of benefits available to both lone parents and two-parent families. Although government policies have had some success in reducing child poverty in the UK, there is still progress that needs to be made. In 1999, when child poverty sat at approximately 3.4 million children, Labour set itself the task of halving child poverty by 2010 and eliminating it by 2020. Government failed to reach its target and instead saw an increase to an estimated 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK in 2012. The sudden increase can be attributed to the on-going economic crisis in the UK which has plunged many more families closer and under the poverty line due to a lack of jobs, frozen pay, increased living costs and spending cuts. Furthermore, under current government policy child poverty is expected to rise with an expected 300,000 more children living in poverty by 2015/2016 and an estimated 4.2 million children living in poverty by 2020. While it is obvious that Working Tax Credits and Child Tax Credits have displayed some success, the current economic crisis has limited that further success and in turn resulted in a rise in child poverty.
    Poverty amongst pensioners is a big concern in the UK, with British pensioners being among Europe’s poorest, and so there are several government policies that aim to reduce poverty for the elderly, namely Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments, both of which have helped to reduce poverty amongst the UK’s pensioners. Everyone in the UK is entitled to a state pension, however Pension Credit is an additional payment which boosts the income of UK pensioners living on a low income. Winter Fuel Payments are a one-off annual payment which is used to help reduce fuel poverty and other health problems associated with this. Pension Credits and the Winter Fuel Payments have seen some success since their implementation, with a drop of 700,000 pensioners living in poverty from 1997 to 2005, however since then little progress has been made. Reports have revealed that 9/10 pensioners are aware of the benefits that they are entitled to yet only 2/10 claim their benefits. This could be due to a lack of awareness, a lack of understanding regarding the process of claiming benefits or simply down to the fact that they are reluctant to ask for help, all of these reasons being limitations on the success of the government policies in place which are meant to benefit pensioners. Further highlighting the unsuccessfulness of policies such as Pension Credits are statistics which reveal that 1 in 6 pensioners, approximately 1.8 million, were living in poverty in the UK in 2011, with 1.2 million pensioners living on the edge of poverty. Like the policies in place to aid in reducing child poverty, Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments displayed initial success, however there are still many pensioners in the UK living in, or on the edge of poverty, and thus it can only be concluded that Pension Credits and Winter Fuel Payments have displayed limited success.
    Those who are unemployed and those who are low-paid are another group that can easily fall into poverty in the UK and so there are several government policies in place to prevent that happening, two of them being the New Deal and National Minimum Wage. The New Deal is the Government’s central policy for helping the unemployed into employment through various schemes, whereas NMW aims to remove the problem of poverty pay. It has been reported that NMW has helped to increase the income of over 1 million workers, 75% of whom are women. In April 2013, NMW was raised to £6.31 for those aged 20 and above, to £5.05 for those aged 18-20 and to £3.72 for those aged 16-17, and reports suggest that approximately 1 million workers benefit annually from the rise in NMW. The New Deal has also seen success; since its implementation it has moved approximately 1.8 million off of benefits and into employment and in Scotland, 78% of the long-term unemployed amongst young people moved into sustained jobs. It has been proven that people who live in households where at least one person is unemployed account for 40% of those living in poverty, meaning that government policies like the New Deal and NMW are vital in preventing poverty and the problems that can arise as a result of that. The combination of the New Deal and NMW has helped to increase the employment rate by an average of 2.5%, showing that both policies have been successful to some extent; however as with all the previously mentioned government policies, their success has been limited. Many complain that despite it rising with inflation, NMW is too low. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation identified the minimum standard of living to equate to an hourly pay rate of £7.38, yet in 2010 around 3.5 million workers were paid less than £7 per hour. Similarly, the New Deal has also seen some failings. More people have left the New Deal 25+ scheme and returned to claim Jobseekers Allowance than those who have gained employment and 2/5 people who manage to enter employment are back into unemployment within 6 months. In summary, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst the unemployed and low-paid have seen partial success.
    In conclusion, Government policies to reduce poverty amongst children, the elderly, and the unemployed and low-paid have been successful to some extent. Their partial success can be attributed to the economic crisis which the UK currently faces and which has been too powerful for government policy to counter.


    Its great thank you i second somebody elses question whether you have social economic inequalities in health and wealth. thats the one im struggling with!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    For NGO essays how many organisation should you know or does it really matter?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
    Applying to university
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.