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    (Original post by JamieHarris1998)
    My structure is like

    Into defining the key term in question and saying my argument in around 2 mins.

    For each para, I usually get 3 done.

    Point
    Explain
    Example
    Link To Question
    Counter
    Explain
    Link
    Judgement

    Then conclude as quick as possible
    This is what I do also. If done right, it's effectively six paragraphs in a much more clean format and structured more organically - therefore reads better.
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    Can digital democracy be a 25 marker
    You really can't use a lot of examples tbh
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Ah I see, just a quick question what is even the difference in what you cover in the second year? I've seen stuff about America but do you have to do that?


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    Our school does US politics for a2, though there are other topics your school might teach. The amount of content is a hell of a lot more to know and a lot more context needs to be known. It's actually a lot more interesting than UK politics by a mile though.
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    For every 25 mark question they expect at least 4 arguments to get into the final bracket on AO1, but these 4 arguments have to be well explained and analysed. So if you can every point you make say why it can be argued another way and make sure at the end of each paragraph refer back to the question.

    For make a case for/against...
    4 arguments for which ever side it wants you to argue
    For to what extent...
    2 for and 2 against
    The Assess questions it depends how the question is worded
    if it like this one
    Assess The Arguments In Favour Of The Greater Use OfDirect Democracy In The UK (25 Marker)
    You do 4 arguments in favour of greater use of direct democracy

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can digital democracy be a 25 marker
    You really can't use a lot of examples tbh
    The petitions committee was set up in 2015 and a brand new petitions government page was formed

    https://petition.parliament.uk/


    http://www.parliament.uk/business/co...ommittee/role/

    It's really important to know this.
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    (Original post by Pato1)
    Our school does US politics for a2, though there are other topics your school might teach. The amount of content is a hell of a lot more to know and a lot more context needs to be known. It's actually a lot more interesting than UK politics by a mile though.
    Oh okay thanks for letting me know, us politics does sound quite enjoyable


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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can digital democracy be a 25 marker
    You really can't use a lot of examples tbh
    nope. it may be 10 marker / 5 marker only. 25 markers cant be that specific.
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    Hey I just wanted ask how would you answer the question of to what extent is the Labour Party still committed to its traditional principles? please
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    hiya, this is for unit 2 but does anyone have an example of a debate which the government has won with its majority?
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    (Original post by Matty_Lamb)
    To what extent questions are 2 for 2 against
    as a general rule.
    So if the question was ArePressure Groups Becoming More Powerful, Or Less Powerful
    you would do 2 saying they are more powerful and 2 saying they are less powerful
    aren't you meant to have at least 3 on each side?
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    (Original post by tom476zf)
    aren't you meant to have at least 3 on each side?
    4 altogether. 2 for & 2 against is the safest bet.
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    (Original post by Loniel)
    Hey I just wanted ask how would you answer the question of to what extent is the Labour Party still committed to its traditional principles? please
    hi there, teacher sent us this it may be of help.

    The Labour Party in the UK is often definedas a left-of-centre or even left-wing party. It has a constitutional commitmentto socialism and has a focus on traditional principles, which defined the partyin its inception and continue to mould its future.
    However, there have beenquestions raised about the commitment to and degree of relevance of thesetraditional principles.
    The Labour Party is committed to theneeds of the working classes and sees them as the most deserving section ofsociety. As such it has tailored policies to alleviating this section’smaterial poverty. This can be seen in welfare programmes, from welfare benefitsto the minimum wage. The hesitant return of the 10p tax band is a case inpoint.
    However, it is alleged that in order to be more electorally successfulthe Labour Party had had to widen its appeal to all classes and sections ofsociety. In so doing it has reached out to other classes in society and also tothe business and city groups.
    The Labour Party is committed to bepro-state and favours intervention in the economy to secure fairness insociety. The Labour Party has intervened in the economy where possible. It hasnationalised Northern Rock and encouraged banks to merge in order to survive ina global market.
    However, the wide scale nationalisation programme, long acommitment of Labour before and after the Second World War, has gone. It may betrue that the emphasis of the new Clause IV is to control rather than to own.
    Building on from the above, it may beseen that the Labour Party was in favour of a managed economy where theGovernment was a key actor in securing outcomes on its own terms. There hasbeen a move now in the Party to work with a market economy and be bound by therules which a market system dictates, thus rewarding individual merit and hardwork as a prime motivator.
    The Labour Party traditionally was notvery active in terms of constitutional change. It may have favoured reform, butthis was never at its core. Since 1997 the Labour Party has delivered one ofthe most radical constitutional reform programmes in over 100 years and haschanged the political framework of the UK.
    The Labour Party was committed to theprovision of universal benefits. Now either by financial restraint or policydirection benefits are targeted to achieve economic well-being.

    In overview, the Labour Party may be seenas less ideological and focused and more pragmatic. More practical in achievingrealistic outcomes than unobtainable ones.• There is the accusation that Labour hasadopted fully the reforms of Mrs Thatcher and the Conservative Party. The beliefis the so called Third Way is a re-programming of the traditional principles ofthe Labour Party. This can be viewed as part of the change from Old Labour toNew Labour
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can digital democracy be a 25 marker
    You really can't use a lot of examples tbh
    It won't be a 25 marker at all, no where near enough content. If anything, 10 marker.
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    (Original post by Loniel)
    Hey I just wanted ask how would you answer the question of to what extent is the Labour Party still committed to its traditional principles? please
    Just talk about 'old' Labour before Blair/Brown and the 'New Labour' Blair and Brown brought in.
    Also with this question you have to talk in the old Labour section how Corbyn is argubly taking Labour back to how it was before Brown and Blair.
    Make sure you talk about the split that is going on in the Labour party now with Blair supporters and the old Labour supporters, supporting Corbyn
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    (Original post by lilavocado)
    hiya, this is for unit 2 but does anyone have an example of a debate which the government has won with its majority?
    Bombing Syria!!!!
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    4 altogether. 2 for & 2 against is the safest bet.
    so 2 for 2 against for to what extent questions. how many for assess, discuss and evaluate questions?
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    (Original post by Loniel)
    Hey I just wanted ask how would you answer the question of to what extent is the Labour Party still committed to its traditional principles? please
    This question won't be worded like that. I think it'd be, to what extent has the Labour Party abandoned the ideas of New Labour?
    Then you talk about: Re-nationalisation (railway), higher tax (60p additional rate & mansion tax), less authoritarian/pro war (against Syria and against Trident)
    but:
    Both factions believed in high spending on NHS and education (received the highest spending a government has given). Both pro-EU too.
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    (Original post by tom476zf)
    so 2 for 2 against for to what extent questions. how many for assess, discuss and evaluate questions?
    Evaluate the strengths, etc. = 4 strengths, then evaluate at the end of the paragraph
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    (Original post by tom476zf)
    aren't you meant to have at least 3 on each side?
    The Mark Scheme no longer specifies, in like 2011 and before that it said to get into threshold 3(which is the highest bracket) need 4 arguments.
    So my teacher told me that when it says in the new mark scheme balanced it means 2 for 2 against.
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    (Original post by tom476zf)
    hi there, teacher sent us this it may be of help.

    The Labour Party in the UK is often definedas a left-of-centre or even left-wing party. It has a constitutional commitmentto socialism and has a focus on traditional principles, which defined the partyin its inception and continue to mould its future.
    However, there have beenquestions raised about the commitment to and degree of relevance of thesetraditional principles.
    The Labour Party is committed to theneeds of the working classes and sees them as the most deserving section ofsociety. As such it has tailored policies to alleviating this section’smaterial poverty. This can be seen in welfare programmes, from welfare benefitsto the minimum wage. The hesitant return of the 10p tax band is a case inpoint.
    However, it is alleged that in order to be more electorally successfulthe Labour Party had had to widen its appeal to all classes and sections ofsociety. In so doing it has reached out to other classes in society and also tothe business and city groups.
    The Labour Party is committed to bepro-state and favours intervention in the economy to secure fairness insociety. The Labour Party has intervened in the economy where possible. It hasnationalised Northern Rock and encouraged banks to merge in order to survive ina global market.
    However, the wide scale nationalisation programme, long acommitment of Labour before and after the Second World War, has gone. It may betrue that the emphasis of the new Clause IV is to control rather than to own.
    Building on from the above, it may beseen that the Labour Party was in favour of a managed economy where theGovernment was a key actor in securing outcomes on its own terms. There hasbeen a move now in the Party to work with a market economy and be bound by therules which a market system dictates, thus rewarding individual merit and hardwork as a prime motivator.
    The Labour Party traditionally was notvery active in terms of constitutional change. It may have favoured reform, butthis was never at its core. Since 1997 the Labour Party has delivered one ofthe most radical constitutional reform programmes in over 100 years and haschanged the political framework of the UK.
    The Labour Party was committed to theprovision of universal benefits. Now either by financial restraint or policydirection benefits are targeted to achieve economic well-being.

    In overview, the Labour Party may be seenas less ideological and focused and more pragmatic. More practical in achievingrealistic outcomes than unobtainable ones.• There is the accusation that Labour hasadopted fully the reforms of Mrs Thatcher and the Conservative Party. The beliefis the so called Third Way is a re-programming of the traditional principles ofthe Labour Party. This can be viewed as part of the change from Old Labour toNew Labour
    Thank you this was so helpful
 
 
 
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