Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have found myself in a similar situation. For some reason some teachers seem to give a lot of criticism as feedback rather than helpful advice or constructive criticism. Often it's the teacher trying to show that they are in charge and throw their weight around a bit.

    I've had some difficulties with a teacher than never observed me but continued to tell everyone that I wasn't improving. On the rare occasion that I was observed (she only showed up for university observations) she would rip my lesson apart even though I got good feedback from my uni.

    My advice is to persevere as the majority of the course is over. We have one term left and everyone seems happier in the summer anyway! Don't let a bad school / tutor / teacher get you down. If I would've let my mentor bother me I would have left before Christmas. I stuck with it because I love the job and the thought of leaving her behind at the end of the course is what kept me going!!!! :yes:

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Wiki Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by traineeteacher_)
    Thank you! I will definitely try to ask the less critical/ more approachable teachers for advice. Hopefully I can get clearer targets that I can work towards. One teacher has already given me some helpful advice and i recently got very positive feedback from him but I'm not sure if my mentor knows. Of course I try to use the same strategies in my other lessons but the teachers at my school don't always agree with each other. Either way, I will try to talk to the more approachable teachers and hopefully I can get through this somehow.
    Definitely take hold of the situation and ask for more focussed guidance. Fix one or two problems at a time and ask for very specific useful advice or at least the information to tell you where to find that help.

    As an NQT I still receive frequent targets but I always make sure that it's something that's clearly achievable in a yes/no kinda way. My last one was that I could focus on questioning a little further so we set targets for bouncing questions around the room, reading a book and observing another teacher. My questioning is now one of my strongest skills now. So get them to tell you what you need to improve, and what they would recommend to get that stronger. Observing other teachers is an absolute must!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,

    I'm not a frequent visitor/poster to this site/thread, but I posted here a few months ago, and everyone was so kind and helpful. I am struggling again at the moment, so thought I would drop in to see if anyone can give me any advice.

    For those of you that will remember, I was really struggling with anxiety a few months ago due to the course and my auntie passing away from cancer. I managed to power through and am still on the course, and am absolutely determined to finish as my completion date is June 10th, so I am so close!

    BUT I am still having a real problem with lesson planning. I don't know if it's an anxiety thing, or just complete lack of self-confidence, but I just really struggle to plan lessons. I have been sat in front of my work every day since Sunday, and all I have achieved is marking two sets of books, and almost planning my Year 9 lessons for the week. I still need to plan my Year 7, 8 and 10 lessons for next week, and there's so much uni stuff that I haven't done as well, I'm now completely panicking. If I'd been out having fun, I wouldn't feel so bad, but it's the fact that I have sat in front of it all week and not achieved anything that I just feel awful.

    Does anyone have any tips for lesson planning? Anything that particularly works for you? Anywhere that you find is a great source for inspiration / ideas for activities? And any tips for being able to focus I guess, as that must obviously be a problem for me! I am an English trainee, so if there's anything English specific anyone can offer as well that would be particularly helpful
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LittleRed)
    Does anyone have any tips for lesson planning? Anything that particularly works for you? Anywhere that you find is a great source for inspiration / ideas for activities? And any tips for being able to focus I guess, as that must obviously be a problem for me! I am an English trainee, so if there's anything English specific anyone can offer as well that would be particularly helpful
    Wow, you are so close to finishing, I don't finish until July 8th! I'm so pleased you pushed through the hard times, and I hope that you feel like it is worth it, at least in some ways.

    When I plan lessons, I always start with the end. By the end of the lesson, what will they be able to do? What will be the evidence for this? Since I'm primary, there are plenty of subjects which means a range of outcomes, but for my English lessons, it might be a plan for something, or a piece of writing, or some evidence that shows an understanding of a SPAG concept. To help with this, it can be useful to use something like Target Tracker, if your school uses something like this(?). I am fortunate that both my placement schools use Target Tracker, so I am familiar enough to use it in this way - I take an "I can" statement that links to the topic we are doing, and have that as my learning objective.

    Next, I think about where my children are at already - what can they do? What do they struggle with? By mapping where they are, and where I want them to be, it means I have a path for them to follow, which I have to fill in with my lesson plan. I would think that your classes are ability grouped, so you should have a bit of an easier time in terms of differentiation, because there won't be such a broad range of abilities in your classes (from what I understand). Once I have those two things, I then consider the ways in which I can teach the learning objective. I always try to have something interesting and practical or visual for students, but I appreciate that in secondary English that might not be as straightforward.

    By starting with the learning objective, and understanding how far I need to guide my students, I generally end up with a good lesson plan that works. It doesn't take me too long now, although it took me longer at the start. It gets easier, especially when you know the students. Good luck!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LittleRed)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm not a frequent visitor/poster to this site/thread, but I posted here a few months ago, and everyone was so kind and helpful. I am struggling again at the moment, so thought I would drop in to see if anyone can give me any advice.

    For those of you that will remember, I was really struggling with anxiety a few months ago due to the course and my auntie passing away from cancer. I managed to power through and am still on the course, and am absolutely determined to finish as my completion date is June 10th, so I am so close!

    BUT I am still having a real problem with lesson planning. I don't know if it's an anxiety thing, or just complete lack of self-confidence, but I just really struggle to plan lessons. I have been sat in front of my work every day since Sunday, and all I have achieved is marking two sets of books, and almost planning my Year 9 lessons for the week. I still need to plan my Year 7, 8 and 10 lessons for next week, and there's so much uni stuff that I haven't done as well, I'm now completely panicking. If I'd been out having fun, I wouldn't feel so bad, but it's the fact that I have sat in front of it all week and not achieved anything that I just feel awful.

    Does anyone have any tips for lesson planning? Anything that particularly works for you? Anywhere that you find is a great source for inspiration / ideas for activities? And any tips for being able to focus I guess, as that must obviously be a problem for me! I am an English trainee, so if there's anything English specific anyone can offer as well that would be particularly helpful
    Bean brain gives very good advice. Always think "What do I want them to get out of this lesson?" and go from there.

    This may involve thinking "What do I want them to get out of this half term/block of lessons?" And breaking that in to a few objectives. Obviously the speed/objectives might shift as you move through but it helps with coming up with the objective if you're not sure and give you an overview.

    If you have a supportive mentor I'd definitely ask them for how they do it. They may have some very helpful practical tips.

    For things like starters and plenaries you might like to make a list of things to do e.g. specific short games or tasks, and then just pick one for each lesson and apply it to the content you're doing. This can save a lot of time - you don't have to reinvent the wheel every lesson, if something works well with that class then use it again

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LittleRed)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm not a frequent visitor/poster to this site/thread, but I posted here a few months ago, and everyone was so kind and helpful. I am struggling again at the moment, so thought I would drop in to see if anyone can give me any advice.

    For those of you that will remember, I was really struggling with anxiety a few months ago due to the course and my auntie passing away from cancer. I managed to power through and am still on the course, and am absolutely determined to finish as my completion date is June 10th, so I am so close!

    BUT I am still having a real problem with lesson planning. I don't know if it's an anxiety thing, or just complete lack of self-confidence, but I just really struggle to plan lessons. I have been sat in front of my work every day since Sunday, and all I have achieved is marking two sets of books, and almost planning my Year 9 lessons for the week. I still need to plan my Year 7, 8 and 10 lessons for next week, and there's so much uni stuff that I haven't done as well, I'm now completely panicking. If I'd been out having fun, I wouldn't feel so bad, but it's the fact that I have sat in front of it all week and not achieved anything that I just feel awful.

    Does anyone have any tips for lesson planning? Anything that particularly works for you? Anywhere that you find is a great source for inspiration / ideas for activities? And any tips for being able to focus I guess, as that must obviously be a problem for me! I am an English trainee, so if there's anything English specific anyone can offer as well that would be particularly helpful
    Hey. I am not a secondary trainee so cannot offer advice specific to your situation but as someone who is GAD diagnosed and who is currently undertaking CBT, I can completely relate to your feelings of anxiety and feeling of total loss!

    Why don't you ask your mentor for some help with planning and explain that you need some more guidance with this? Or is there another trainee from your course you could plan with to bounce ideas from? Could you perhaps join a group on Facebook? I know there is one for Primary and teachers sometimes post with queries when they are blank for ideas, I am sure you maybe able to get some inspiration from there. Could you look at previous planning at your school for some ideas?

    Also, with the anxiety, I would have some time away from lesson planning which is probably not what you want to read, but it will give you some time to clear your head. You will find you go back to it with a clearer mind and may be able to focus a little better. When you get in one of those states sometimes it is best to just stand up and walk away and come an hour or so later. Go for a walk, listen to music, phone a friend. Whatever it is that can clam you down.

    Keep going! We don't have left long now.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hello all, I'm starting my school direct primary in September and I am just starting to look at getting things like folders in ready to start. For the teaching standards, I've seen some people say a folder for each one and other have it all in one folder. Obviously it will vary according to provider, but what would the general advice be for this? One folder per standard, or one big folder to put it all in? Also, as I'm primary, am I right in thinking that I'll also need one folder per subject to put plans etc. in as part of my evidence?
    Thanks
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shannonbeth)
    Hello all, I'm starting my school direct primary in September and I am just starting to look at getting things like folders in ready to start. For the teaching standards, I've seen some people say a folder for each one and other have it all in one folder. Obviously it will vary according to provider, but what would the general advice be for this? One folder per standard, or one big folder to put it all in? Also, as I'm primary, am I right in thinking that I'll also need one folder per subject to put plans etc. in as part of my evidence?
    Wait until you get to uni, no point getting things now. Providers are so different that you'll never guess what you need.

    For example, we do our standards all online. One table that lists evidence for each standards and where you can find it. We do not have a physical folder solely for standards, nevermind one each.

    For first placement I had a lever arch and a ringbinder. For second placement I have two lever arches and a ringbinder. For lecture notes i had five ringbinders (Maths, English, Professional Studies, Science, Other Subjects). So that's 7 ringbinders and 3 lever arches.

    I'm primary and no way you'd ever need a separate folder for each subject's lesson plans. All my lesson plans from first placement are in one lever arch and it's perhaps half full at most. You'll only teach each foundation subject once or twice per week after all.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shannonbeth)
    Hello all, I'm starting my school direct primary in September and I am just starting to look at getting things like folders in ready to start. For the teaching standards, I've seen some people say a folder for each one and other have it all in one folder. Obviously it will vary according to provider, but what would the general advice be for this? One folder per standard, or one big folder to put it all in? Also, as I'm primary, am I right in thinking that I'll also need one folder per subject to put plans etc. in as part of my evidence?
    Thanks
    I agree with JoannaMilano. It depends on how much freedom you will have to do things the way you want. Some course providers have very specific requirements regarding the organisation of folders. I'm on a School Direct course, but the university is very much in charge rather than the school, so just like the regular PGCE students, we have to have two folders for each placement: a planning folder and an evidence folder. These then have to be organised according to the contents page we are provided for each folder.

    You definitely will not need a planning folder for each subject, though. If it's up to you to decide how to organise the folders, set up a planning folder for each placement and divide it according to subject. I have to organise mine chronologically, which isn't particularly helpful as I forget which week I did certain lessons! Even for evidence, one folder could be enough. I have to maintain a portfolio of my best evidence, which is submitted at the end of the year for assessment. Everything else stays in the individual placement evidence folders.

    You could buy a handful of folders and then just wait and see how things pan out once you have started, but occasionally buying isn't even necessary. My university leaves out a box full of unwanted folders for people to help themselves to, which is quite nice.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pierson)
    I agree with JoannaMilano. It depends on how much freedom you will have to do things the way you want. Some course providers have very specific requirements regarding the organisation of folders. I'm on a School Direct course, but the university is very much in charge rather than the school, so just like the regular PGCE students, we have to have two folders for each placement: a planning folder and an evidence folder. These then have to be organised according to the contents page we are provided for each folder.

    You definitely will not need a planning folder for each subject, though. If it's up to you to decide how to organise the folders, set up a planning folder for each placement and divide it according to subject. I have to organise mine chronologically, which isn't particularly helpful as I forget which week I did certain lessons! Even for evidence, one folder could be enough. I have to maintain a portfolio of my best evidence, which is submitted at the end of the year for assessment. Everything else stays in the individual placement evidence folders.

    You could buy a handful of folders and then just wait and see how things pan out once you have started, but occasionally buying isn't even necessary. My university leaves out a box full of unwanted folders for people to help themselves to, which is quite nice.
    (Original post by JoannaMilano)
    Wait until you get to uni, no point getting things now. Providers are so different that you'll never guess what you need.

    For example, we do our standards all online. One table that lists evidence for each standards and where you can find it. We do not have a physical folder solely for standards, nevermind one each.

    For first placement I had a lever arch and a ringbinder. For second placement I have two lever arches and a ringbinder. For lecture notes i had five ringbinders (Maths, English, Professional Studies, Science, Other Subjects). So that's 7 ringbinders and 3 lever arches.

    I'm primary and no way you'd ever need a separate folder for each subject's lesson plans. All my lesson plans from first placement are in one lever arch and it's perhaps half full at most. You'll only teach each foundation subject once or twice per week after all.
    Ok, thank you both! I have just been reading through blogs and TES etc so I was just taking it from there, I am an eager beaver/stationery lover so I just need to chill I think!

    I'll get a few folders in and see how it goes, I have an induction with my SCITT in July so I will ask then.

    Thanks
    • Offline

      1
      I need some advise here!

      The job I got for September is an independent school. I was reviewing the contract and there's no mention about the induction period in it.

      Before I make any demands to the school I want to make sure that I fully understand the process of gaining full QTS.

      According to the Independent Schools' Teacher Induction Panel (ISTIP), "Each year some 1200 NQTs (newly qualified teachers) begin induction in our schools.Over 80% of them are still there three years later, often at the same school. Before embarking on their induction year, they acquired Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)."

      On the other hand the DfE says"All qualified teachers who are employed in a relevant school in England must, by law, have completed an induction period satisfactorily"

      So I thought that QTS was gained only after the NQT year, provided that you passed the induction period. Does this mean that the induction period is in fact optional? Would I get full QTS status with or without induction on my first year?

      I'm confused
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      My understanding was that we gain QTS the summer we qualify (our uni told us our exam board convenes to provisionally grant it in July and it's made official in September).

      Most of the job ads I've been looking at have said "QTS essential (or obtained by September)". And these are jobs open to NQTS so that seems to confirm we gain QTS upon course completion.


      The NQT induction is separate from qualifying and I'm not sure how it would work moving from private to state. Independent schools have all their own rules so I guess they wouldn't have to offer an NQT induction if they didn't want to.

      But then- and I don't have any source for this, it's just a guess- you might find if you transferred to the state sector later, you'd still have to complete NQT induction? Possibly at an M1 pay level?

      Schools can fast track you through the induction period these days, so if you moved from private to state with enough experience, I'd assume you'd only have the bare minimum NQT induction assuming your practice was good.
      Offline

      20
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by abel.suisse)
      I need some advise here!

      The job I got for September is an independent school. I was reviewing the contract and there's no mention about the induction period in it.

      Before I make any demands to the school I want to make sure that I fully understand the process of gaining full QTS.

      According to the Independent Schools' Teacher Induction Panel (ISTIP), "Each year some 1200 NQTs (newly qualified teachers) begin induction in our schools.Over 80% of them are still there three years later, often at the same school. Before embarking on their induction year, they acquired Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)."

      On the other hand the DfE says"All qualified teachers who are employed in a relevant school in England must, by law, have completed an induction period satisfactorily"

      So I thought that QTS was gained only after the NQT year, provided that you passed the induction period. Does this mean that the induction period is in fact optional? Would I get full QTS status with or without induction on my first year?

      I'm confused
      (Original post by JoannaMilano)
      My understanding was that we gain QTS the summer we qualify (our uni told us our exam board convenes to provisionally grant it in July and it's made official in September).

      Most of the job ads I've been looking at have said "QTS essential (or obtained by September)". And these are jobs open to NQTS so that seems to confirm we gain QTS upon course completion.


      The NQT induction is separate from qualifying and I'm not sure how it would work moving from private to state. Independent schools have all their own rules so I guess they wouldn't have to offer an NQT induction if they didn't want to.

      But then- and I don't have any source for this, it's just a guess- you might find if you transferred to the state sector later, you'd still have to complete NQT induction? Possibly at an M1 pay level?

      Schools can fast track you through the induction period these days, so if you moved from private to state with enough experience, I'd assume you'd only have the bare minimum NQT induction assuming your practice was good.
      You get QTS upon successful completion of your PGCE course or placements etc, you never lose this. You don't lose it if you don't complete your NQT within 50 years let alone 5.

      The downside is that if you don't do it, you can no longer do supply teaching five years after qualifying, which is always a nice option to have.

      The likelihood is that I will never complete mine...ever! This is due to me deciding to teach in FE now I've done my PGCE, and a lot of FE colleges don't offer NQT years. But I will always have QTS.
      • Offline

        1
        (Original post by Airfairy)
        You get QTS upon successful completion of your PGCE course or placements etc, you never lose this. You don't lose it if you don't complete your NQT within 50 years let alone 5.

        The downside is that if you don't do it, you can no longer do supply teaching five years after qualifying, which is always a nice option to have.

        The likelihood is that I will never complete mine...ever! This is due to me deciding to teach in FE now I've done my PGCE, and a lot of FE colleges don't offer NQT years. But I will always have QTS.
        That's great to know!!

        To be honest I'd rather avoid doing the induction year, that would spare me from further observations and paperwork that IMHO does not compensate for the 10% reduction in the timetable. However, I thought there were massive disadvantages with that, most specifically being unable to be a fully qualified teacher.

        I was not too worried about being unable to teach in state schools in the future, especially with the current plan to turn all schools into academies.

        I suppose I won't say anything under these circumstances

        Thanks!
        Offline

        18
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by abel.suisse)
        That's great to know!!

        To be honest I'd rather avoid doing the induction year, that would spare me from further observations and paperwork that IMHO does not compensate for the 10% reduction in the timetable. However, I thought there were massive disadvantages with that, most specifically being unable to be a fully qualified teacher.

        I was not too worried about being unable to teach in state schools in the future, especially with the current plan to turn all schools into academies.

        I suppose I won't say anything under these circumstances

        Thanks!
        It's worth asking anyway. I guess it's comparable to automatic vs manual car licences in a way. You have more freedom and options if you complete it. If you have a job offer you really like it's probably not worth declining for that, especially since you hope to work in private. But if they can offer it it's a positive.

        Regarding paperwork, it's much much more manageable compared to the PGCE so I wouldn't let that put you off. It's just about 6 short obs and 6 action plans for the year, plus keeping a small folder of teaching standards evidencw. You should get simple, easily achievable targets with clear ways to reach them and actually it's really helpful to keep you reflecting and learning new things I'd say it only generates a couple of extra hours work a month.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        • TSR Support Team
        • Wiki Support Team
        • Peer Support Volunteers
        • PS Reviewer
        • Clearing and Applications Advisor
        • Welcome Squad
        Offline

        20
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by kpwxx)
        It's worth asking anyway. I guess it's comparable to automatic vs manual car licences in a way. You have more freedom and options if you complete it. If you have a job offer you really like it's probably not worth declining for that, especially since you hope to work in private. But if they can offer it it's a positive.

        Regarding paperwork, it's much much more manageable compared to the PGCE so I wouldn't let that put you off. It's just about 6 short obs and 6 action plans for the year, plus keeping a small folder of teaching standards evidencw. You should get simple, easily achievable targets with clear ways to reach them and actually it's really helpful to keep you reflecting and learning new things I'd say it only generates a couple of extra hours work a month.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        We don't even have to complete a folder. Just observation, targets and then a tiny evaluation before starting the cycle again. Repeat until 6 observations are done and then we're signed off.

        It all seems oddly school dependent.
        • Study Helper
        Offline

        16
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by abel.suisse)
        That's great to know!!

        To be honest I'd rather avoid doing the induction year, that would spare me from further observations and paperwork that IMHO does not compensate for the 10% reduction in the timetable. However, I thought there were massive disadvantages with that, most specifically being unable to be a fully qualified teacher.

        I was not too worried about being unable to teach in state schools in the future, especially with the current plan to turn all schools into academies.

        I suppose I won't say anything under these circumstances

        Thanks!
        The NQT year varies in workload from school to school. I would say I've spent less than 5 hours in total doing things I wouldn't otherwise do - I've had two pieces of paperwork to fill out and haven't needed a folder, or lesson plans. Over the course of the year I am observed six times, which is nothing really. Don't let that put you off of doing the job - lots of schools will just treat you as a regular teacher on a slightly reduced timetable.
        Offline

        0
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by Rachel147)
        I have found myself in a similar situation. For some reason some teachers seem to give a lot of criticism as feedback rather than helpful advice or constructive criticism. Often it's the teacher trying to show that they are in charge and throw their weight around a bit.

        I've had some difficulties with a teacher than never observed me but continued to tell everyone that I wasn't improving. On the rare occasion that I was observed (she only showed up for university observations) she would rip my lesson apart even though I got good feedback from my uni.

        My advice is to persevere as the majority of the course is over. We have one term left and everyone seems happier in the summer anyway! Don't let a bad school / tutor / teacher get you down. If I would've let my mentor bother me I would have left before Christmas. I stuck with it because I love the job and the thought of leaving her behind at the end of the course is what kept me going!!!! :yes:

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        Thank you! sorry for the late reply, I haven't been very well lately.

        I'm sorry you had such a difficult time yourself I'm glad that you are happy in your job now! Hopefully I will find a job in a nice school too if I manage to get through this.

        It's really hard and I just feel like I can't get anything right anymore. I feel like I'm being bullied but no one will do anything about it.I felt like I had to make my mentor and the university aware of it because it's really affected my confidence but no one seems to believe me. Things are even worse since I mentioned it and I honestly don't know how I can get through this.
        Offline

        0
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
        Definitely take hold of the situation and ask for more focussed guidance. Fix one or two problems at a time and ask for very specific useful advice or at least the information to tell you where to find that help.

        As an NQT I still receive frequent targets but I always make sure that it's something that's clearly achievable in a yes/no kinda way. My last one was that I could focus on questioning a little further so we set targets for bouncing questions around the room, reading a book and observing another teacher. My questioning is now one of my strongest skills now. So get them to tell you what you need to improve, and what they would recommend to get that stronger. Observing other teachers is an absolute must!
        That's what I've tried to do. I will have to ask them for more focuses guidance but it's difficult because they don't really seem to have the time to help me.

        I will have to see if I can observe more other teachers. I don't have any say when it comes to targets, I will have to work on the ones I'm given, which is fine but I think they should be clearer. They will usefully ask if I feel that I achieved them but I don't have much confidence so I normally just agree with whatever they say (even if their judgement seems a little bit harsh at times).
        Offline

        18
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
        We don't even have to complete a folder. Just observation, targets and then a tiny evaluation before starting the cycle again. Repeat until 6 observations are done and then we're signed off.

        It all seems oddly school dependent.
        Thinking back I think the folder may have been a more personal thing. It just helped me to tick off the list of which standards I needed to work on and it was a nice resource for myself to draw on to make an interview portfolio.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
       
       
       
    • See more of what you like on The Student Room

      You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

    • Poll
      What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    • See more of what you like on The Student Room

      You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

    • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

      Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

      Quick reply
      Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.