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    (Original post by abel.suisse)
    That's great to know!!

    To be honest I'd rather avoid doing the induction year, that would spare me from further observations and paperwork that IMHO does not compensate for the 10% reduction in the timetable. However, I thought there were massive disadvantages with that, most specifically being unable to be a fully qualified teacher.

    I was not too worried about being unable to teach in state schools in the future, especially with the current plan to turn all schools into academies.

    I suppose I won't say anything under these circumstances

    Thanks!
    Like others have said, the NQT isn't like a PGCE year all over again haha. I mean, if I had a choice then I'd do it. I want to do it just because it's official. But from asking around apparently it's fairly common in FE to never do it, and I have no intention whatsoever of going back to secondary so I guess it's not the worst thing for me.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Thinking back I think the folder may have been a more personal thing. It just helped me to tick off the list of which standards I needed to work on and it was a nice resource for myself to draw on to make an interview portfolio.

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    I wish we'd been told to do something similar. It'd have really helped when I have to remember how far I've come.
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    Hi everyone!
    It's been such a long time since I last posted - people weren't kidding when they said doing a PGCE will mean you have literally no time.
    Anyway it's gotten to that time of year where I'm trying to secure a job for September. I have an interview on Tuesday and I was just wondering if anyone has any tips or advice to offer?
    I have to do a 5-minute presentation to the governors on 'Why I'm Unique' (struggling here!), a 20-minutes maths lesson with a Reception class, a short written task and the interview itself. Sigh...
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    (Original post by xjosielr)
    Hi everyone!
    It's been such a long time since I last posted - people weren't kidding when they said doing a PGCE will mean you have literally no time.
    Anyway it's gotten to that time of year where I'm trying to secure a job for September. I have an interview on Tuesday and I was just wondering if anyone has any tips or advice to offer?
    I have to do a 5-minute presentation to the governors on 'Why I'm Unique' (struggling here!), a 20-minutes maths lesson with a Reception class, a short written task and the interview itself. Sigh...

    Not sure about the presentation (what an odd task!) but I would say to be yourself as much as possible (within reason). If you're relaxed and comfortable you'll be more confident. I'd imagine you need to think about the job specification and how you meet it (in terms of your unique experiences and skills) but maybe with a different spin on it.

    For the lesson, I would say:
    -Keep it simple (you've only got 20 minutes) but make sure you show progress. Pick one thing you want pupils to be able to do by the end of the lesson, and think of a plenary that will demonstrate that they can do it.
    -Have a back-up plan/optional activities which can be added in or cut out as timings allow. I always wrote on my plan how I would do it differently in a full 1-hour lesson and interviewers really liked this.
    -It doesn't matter if it doesn't go perfectly (you don't know the kids so it's hard to plan for them properly) - the point is to show that you know how to plan and are reflective. The follow-up conversation about the lesson you taught is just as important as the lesson itself, so be honest about what worked, what didn't work, and what you'd do differently. Schools won't expect you to be perfect, they want you to be someone who can take on board feedback and who is willing to learn.
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    Urgh that presentation sounds awful. It'd probably make me reconsider going unless i loved the school because it's so not my thing and says something about the school. Even as an interview question discussion, I find it challenging nevermind a whole 5 minute talking at people!

    20 minutes is quite a nice time for a reception maths lesson, considering their attention spans. Much more realistic than 'a 20 minute lesson for year 4 on descriptive writing' which is frustrating! For my interview I found they cared more about building relationships and how you talk to the children than actual subject knowledge or even lesson planning. They commented in feedback that they were surprised there was so much content! So I'd focus on that as much as lesson planning.
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    After your lesson, write a quick evaluation. Literally what went well, how you would improve it. Gives you something to discuss and shows you as a proactive, reflective practitioner
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    Hi everyone! I have an interview in two days I am so nervous about. I have to do a 20 minute lesson (literally no guidelines besides that they're at ks3). I also have to do a presentation on myself, and the interview itself, as well as literacy/numeracy tests, but I'm mostly super lost on the lesson itself. Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated!
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    Had my first child lose their tooth in a lesson, complete with updates on the state of the bleeding from the sink every two seconds. The joys of key stage one! :top:
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    After a discussion at uni today I was interested to get the thoughts of people on this thread :teeth:
    As your final grade for PGCE doesn't actually count towards potential jobs and doesn't really count for anything many people on my course have decided they want to do the bare minimum to get by and scrape through with a 3. I really don't agree with this as I think it's good to make effort and use initiative rather than scrape through and take the easy route?!??!?

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    (Original post by Rachel147)
    After a discussion at uni today I was interested to get the thoughts of people on this thread :teeth:
    As your final grade for PGCE doesn't actually count towards potential jobs and doesn't really count for anything many people on my course have decided they want to do the bare minimum to get by and scrape through with a 3. I really don't agree with this as I think it's good to make effort and use initiative rather than scrape through and take the easy route?!??!?

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    I didn't think you got a classification for pgce, since its only half a master's... When I did my master's, you got a pass, merit or distinction...

    The coursework expectation in pgce is quite low - in quality, well imo... So I guess I'd agree with doing what you need to pass... My focus is on the teaching and not the crap assignments uni dish out tbh...
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    (Original post by Rachel147)
    After a discussion at uni today I was interested to get the thoughts of people on this thread :teeth:
    As your final grade for PGCE doesn't actually count towards potential jobs and doesn't really count for anything many people on my course have decided they want to do the bare minimum to get by and scrape through with a 3. I really don't agree with this as I think it's good to make effort and use initiative rather than scrape through and take the easy route?!??!?

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    Making an continued effort and working hard means that, as an NQT, the hard work you have to put in is less likely to come as a surprise, in my view. I know a lot of people on my (SD) course were very lax with their last PGCE assignment, which struck me as stupid, since being too relaxed about it means that you might have to redo it at a lower level... In my opinion, everyone is best to take on as much as they can without compromising anything, and get as much good experience out of it as they possibly can.

    On the other hand with our course, the course manager is basically fixated on everyone achieving an 'Outstanding' grade. As much as I would like to achieve this, it bugs me how hard she seems to be pushing for everyone to get there. If you think about the meaning of 'Outstanding', it means that people are significantly above average. If everyone ends up as significantly above average, surely that means that average needs to be moved??? Obviously this would need to happen on a national level for it to be changed, but my point stands - in the law of averages, not everyone should achieve Outstanding. In fact, not everybody [u]should[/] be able to achieve it.

    Maybe I'm getting irritated over nothing, but it still bugs me...
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    At my uni, a 3 isn't considered a pass. Like, I'm not sure technically if you still get the PGCE if you're on a 3 but we're put on report and given extra observations if we're a 3 or a 4. After all, 3 is "requires improvement" now, not "satisfactory" like it used to be.

    Even leaving aside the course technicalities, I think it's an awful attitude. How can you stand in front of children and push them and demand the best from them, when you're phoning it in yourself? Of course some days you'll end up with less than stellar plans or just wing it- you're human after all. But to deliberately do so is the definition of unprofessional behaviour for a teacher imo.

    I have to admit, I don't think this applies to the essays and paperwork side. I'm. Definitely not stressing over the essays as much as I did at undergrad. My comments about professionalism are solely about people who are deliberately doing the bare minimum teaching-wise
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    I think there's a distinction here between essays (where at my uni it was also pass and fail, pass being equivalent to, I think, a 2:1 or above) and placements (where many unis use ofsted grades for trainees, an idea which I still think is unnecessarily confusing).

    I totally agree that trainees should always be trying their hardest at the teaching side. Of course, as mentioned above, this doesn't mean getting it perfect all the time, nor does it mean sacrificing your own well being. But it does mean not purposely putting in less effort.

    I'm guessing from the way the OP said about the grades not counting for jobs, they were originally referring to the academic side of the PGCE. While I do agree that the teaching itself should be the main focus and the essays should not get in the way of this, the essays should be designed by your training provider to give you a deeper insight in to teaching, so I think it's wise to still do your best. In terms of practicalities, if you had an essay due and plans for tomorrow needed you'd choose the plans to focus on, but hopefully no uni is silly enough to schedule deadlines in the middle of placements...

    I think it's important to remember the purpose of the PGCE. It's designed to teach you to be a good teacher, not just show you someone else doing it and get you to copy them. Good teaching requires a high level of reflection and a deep understanding of human learning, behaviours and child development. This is what training to teach is really about (more so, I think, than learning specific methods, tips and tricks or subject knowledge). And the assignments set by your uni should help you achieve that if the uni is worth its salt. Having said all that, being very reflective and reading widely etc doesn't necessarily reflect in the grading of the assignment if that individual doesn't take well to the format it's in e.g. essay, so I would say it's more the effort and learning that should be focussed on. If you work hard and learn a lot but the grade is lower than you'd hoped it is not such a big deal.

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    I have a feeling I will fail my PGCE - I failed my 2nd PGCE assignment and will have to resubmit

    I passed my first one! But this second one I failed =/

    I want to ask - can you fail your PGCE but still be recommended QTS? Cos, my school placement marks are fine.

    At this stage I just want my QTS(!) =/
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    Lots of very interesting comments, thank you!

    I was thinking more about the teaching side of PGCE, some people on my course suggested that they could still pass by just getting "meeting the standards" which is equivalent to a 3 which is a pass, but only just. These people say that they would happily do the bare minimum in their PGCE year because they'll still pass and it'll be easier..... I couldn't believe it! I am busting my guts here trying to be the best I can be and some people will still pass but by doing the absolute least that they can?!

    I didn't mean it in terms of assignments and the academic side. As a school direct trainee it's hard to commit as much time to essays as I did for my undergraduate degree but I still make a damn good effort as I would much rather submit something that I am happy with!

    Thanks for your replies!

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    (Original post by xjay1234)
    I have a feeling I will fail my PGCE - I failed my 2nd PGCE assignment and will have to resubmit

    I passed my first one! But this second one I failed =/

    I want to ask - can you fail your PGCE but still be recommended QTS? Cos, my school placement marks are fine.

    At this stage I just want my QTS(!) =/
    Yes, iirc it is possible to get just the one or the other. Do check your course handbook/ask your tutor about that though. And remember some courses will have assignments that count towards both (for example my course had QTS elements and Masters elements of each assignment, and each was graded separately). You needed the QTS elements to be passes to get QTS.

    (Original post by Rachel147)
    Lots of very interesting comments, thank you!

    I was thinking more about the teaching side of PGCE, some people on my course suggested that they could still pass by just getting "meeting the standards" which is equivalent to a 3 which is a pass, but only just. These people say that they would happily do the bare minimum in their PGCE year because they'll still pass and it'll be easier..... I couldn't believe it! I am busting my guts here trying to be the best I can be and some people will still pass but by doing the absolute least that they can?!

    I didn't mean it in terms of assignments and the academic side. As a school direct trainee it's hard to commit as much time to essays as I did for my undergraduate degree but I still make a damn good effort as I would much rather submit something that I am happy with!

    Thanks for your replies!

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    In that case, it seems ridiculous! Perhaps these people are not planning on going in to teaching afterwards? You can and should most certainly refer to how well you did on placement for job applications and interviews.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Yes, iirc it is possible to get just the one or the other. Do check your course handbook/ask your tutor about that though. And remember some courses will have assignments that count towards both (for example my course had QTS elements and Masters elements of each assignment, and each was graded separately). You needed the QTS elements to be passes to get QTS.
    Yes - well it is pointless to have a PGCE without the QTS as you can not teach without the QTS.

    Assignments can count towards certain standards, as evidence. But, it is what you do in the school and your teacher file.

    I just feel to dejected, at the moment. ¬_¬
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    That's what I thought! Others seemed to think that it was a waste of energy and they should just muddle through with as little effort as possible... These people were some of the first to get an NQT post for September. Shocker.

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    (Original post by beanbrain)

    On the other hand with our course, the course manager is basically fixated on everyone achieving an 'Outstanding' grade. As much as I would like to achieve this, it bugs me how hard she seems to be pushing for everyone to get there. If you think about the meaning of 'Outstanding', it means that people are significantly above average. If everyone ends up as significantly above average, surely that means that average needs to be moved??? Obviously this would need to happen on a national level for it to be changed, but my point stands - in the law of averages, not everyone should achieve Outstanding. In fact, not everybody [u]should[/] be able to achieve it.

    Maybe I'm getting irritated over nothing, but it still bugs me...
    You have every right to be irritated by it & your analysis is correct - and your course manager probably said much the same thing as you when her line manager set her those targets!
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    (Original post by xjay1234)
    Yes - well it is pointless to have a PGCE without the QTS as you can not teach without the QTS.

    Assignments can count towards certain standards, as evidence. But, it is what you do in the school and your teacher file.

    I just feel to dejected, at the moment. ¬_¬
    Try and stay as positive as possible. As you said, the important part for you is the QTS, and you're doing well at that, so that's great. In my experience, the uni will also do whatever they can to get you a pass on the assignments. Basically, they want you to show that knowledge and understanding. If it doesn't come through in the assignment they will give you another chance to show it some other way e.g. vivas.
 
 
 
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