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    (Original post by Wangers)
    So, after a term of studying embryology with embryologists, I have decided that embryology is awesome
    Embryology is pretty cool :p:

    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Embryology is effort. Its also really rushed when it is "taught" here too - I think we had like one (maybe two) lectures max on it, and the rest was apparently "taught" in our learning landscape (anatomy practicals). Lies.
    Should have done the SSC

    It was a brilliant SSC
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    Oh god, i'm such a wasteman. Sat in my room with a stack of pharmacology notes for 6 hours and all i've accomplished is a new Doodle Jump high score. FFS I have exams in 3 weeks...!
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    (Original post by Vulpes)
    British airways lost my luggage when I arrived in the UK. Flying back, they did the same thing... :cry:
    Stop flying with BA - problem solved!

    Do you fly out from heathrow or manchester? Heathrow in general loses luggage. I too have had my bag lost before when flying in to London. I've had friends who also lost their bags, but apparently sometimes the bag gets put on the wrong belt so next time take a look around before you go to the counter.
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    I think im going to drive myself insane - Im beginning to crack up because of all the worrying!!
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    (Original post by magichearts)
    Stop flying with BA - problem solved!

    Do you fly out from heathrow or manchester? Heathrow in general loses luggage. I too have had my bag lost before when flying in to London. I've had friends who also lost their bags, but apparently sometimes the bag gets put on the wrong belt so next time take a look around before you go to the counter.
    Manc -> Heathrow. Heathrow -> HK.

    Well it was kinda understandable. My Manchester flight was delayed by 2 hours, so basically there was a shuttle bus waiting right where we got off the plane and all of us were rushed off to Terminal 5. Express ticket collection and everything. There was no way they could have gotten our luggage onto the plane on time.

    Already booked all tickets for this year with BA and CX...
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6f2igKCG0s

    Holy ****, imagine if med school interviews were like this. If I ever get involved in interviews later I'm going to be a complete *******
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    3 weeks 3 days to revise for a set of really flipping important exams.

    Time to get on my hardcore hat. I facepalm myself everytime this happens, but if I start earlier I just forget it ffs.
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    (Original post by magichearts)
    Theifrow in general loses luggage.
    FTFY

    r
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Yeah, FPAS clearly demonstrated that at least for foundation jobs, it doesn't really matter if you intercalate or not. It's such a gamble as it is....I wrote my answers doing 70 hour weeks on the floor using a laptop that had a dysfunctional keyboard here and there eight time zones away and got 82, whereas some GEPs, graduates and intercalaters I know spent literally days on each question, sentence by sentence and got like their 10th choice.

    I got 82 and I have no publications, degrees, posters etc....just a straight school leaver. I'm not being blase, I didn't really care where I went and so I didn't put as much effort in it as if I was desperate to stay in London.

    Fair system? Don't think so!
    Bear in mind that a BSc is more useful for later job applications, particularly registrar jobs where the competition gets heavy.

    (also, I don't know if it's changed from my year, but the marking standard was heavily dependent on target foundation schools. In particular, it seemed the London schools were harsher than non-London ones)
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    (Original post by carcinoma)
    How is the MedEd iBSc going? and that is pure reflective gold, haha.
    It's all good on my end. First term has been busy and some parts of it I did find boring and irrelevant (similar to the usual MBBS course). FFC and Rollerball have had to bear my complaints and moans at some points though, but then again almost everyone intercalating that I have spoken to (at least at BL) finds some/all aspects of their course boring and "misses medicine", myself included.

    The first module was comparing traditional courses with PBL, the reasons behind PBL, what motivates students to learn (i.e. would medical students still learn even if there was no exam at the end of the year?), and professionalism/portfolios, all of which was kinda fun. The second module though was so much better! We looked at selection for medical school (and got to design our ideal medical school selection system), widening access, gender/social class/educational/culture/ethnicity demographics at medical school and in particular specialities (O&G, Paeds and Ortho in particular), transformation from student to doctor and the "hidden" curriculum. The third module we start in Jan will be looking at examinations and how fair they are. Our fourth module, which sorta runs throughout the year is the Teaching module where we get to facilitate PBL sessions, give lectures, teach clinical skills, facilitate simulation exercises, facilitate comm skills, teach anatomy, and do some teacher observations. Probably the best module tbh because its very hands on.

    We have a somewhat opinionated group (12 of us) which I think is fantastic - I actually look forward to our group sessions and we all really do get along with each other. D'awwww. :p: Like I said in an earlier post, there aren't usually any right or wrong answers with Med Ed so long as you can justify your answer with some educational theory, so its really nice to bounce ideas and opinions off each other. It's like real life TSR really, and I quite like it tbh. :p:

    Main problems for me are the stacks and stacks of reading to do (we get about half an inch of double sided, multiple-sheets-per-page reading to do each week :yawn:), the non-stop essay assignments (which apparently reduce drastically next term), and the reflective writing we have to keep up with on top of all the teaching/learning/assessments. Sometimes, I do think this should be a BA and not a BSc, but having completed the first term (which is apparently the hardest/most tedious) with an exam on the first day back in Jan, I'd like to think its going ok so far. :p:

    Second year now? How is that? Still gunning for Peninsula as always? :p:
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    Why the medical school feels the need to slot in random, out-of-context learning objectives about nerves when we don't start the nervous system next year is beyond me. :argh:
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    ...
    Note I said "douchebag gunners" - I'm not talking about the lovely nice people that happen to do well in exams that you aspire to be - I mean braggy douchebags
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    It's all good on my end. First term has been busy and some parts of it I did find boring and irrelevant (similar to the usual MBBS course). FFC and Rollerball have had to bear my complaints and moans at some points though, but then again almost everyone intercalating that I have spoken to (at least at BL) finds some/all aspects of their course boring and "misses medicine", myself included.

    The first module was comparing traditional courses with PBL, the reasons behind PBL, what motivates students to learn (i.e. would medical students still learn even if there was no exam at the end of the year?), and professionalism/portfolios, all of which was kinda fun. The second module though was so much better! We looked at selection for medical school (and got to design our ideal medical school selection system), widening access, gender/social class/educational/culture/ethnicity demographics at medical school and in particular specialities (O&G, Paeds and Ortho in particular), transformation from student to doctor and the "hidden" curriculum. The third module we start in Jan will be looking at examinations and how fair they are. Our fourth module, which sorta runs throughout the year is the Teaching module where we get to facilitate PBL sessions, give lectures, teach clinical skills, facilitate simulation exercises, facilitate comm skills, teach anatomy, and do some teacher observations. Probably the best module tbh because its very hands on.

    We have a somewhat opinionated group (12 of us) which I think is fantastic - I actually look forward to our group sessions and we all really do get along with each other. D'awwww. :p: Like I said in an earlier post, there aren't usually any right or wrong answers with Med Ed so long as you can justify your answer with some educational theory, so its really nice to bounce ideas and opinions off each other. It's like real life TSR really, and I quite like it tbh. :p:

    Main problems for me are the stacks and stacks of reading to do (we get about half an inch of double sided, multiple-sheets-per-page reading to do each week :yawn:), the non-stop essay assignments (which apparently reduce drastically next term), and the reflective writing we have to keep up with on top of all the teaching/learning/assessments. Sometimes, I do think this should be a BA and not a BSc, but having completed the first term (which is apparently the hardest/most tedious) with an exam on the first day back in Jan, I'd like to think its going ok so far. :p:

    Second year now? How is that? Still gunning for Peninsula as always? :p:
    That does actually sound like a really interesting iBSc, It is one Id definitely consider If Im offered Intercalation.

    Yea, this year is so much more challenging. The contact hours have only increased slightly but the shear amount of content which has be put into those hours is mind numbing. I can barely cover the expected content, and sometimes I just full on leave stuff out and try to do it during SSC or Consolidation Weeks (which failed lol)


    Yea I guess I still am. Although it annoys me a little that they listened to our feedback on certain aspects of our course and made changes. For example they changed the Evidence Based Practice/Clinical Decision making aspect of the course, so the current first years will get better and far more relevant teaching than we were given.


    Having done the reading and research around your first module, are people still motivated with the absence of an end of year exam?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Why the medical school feels the need to slot in random, out-of-context learning objectives about nerves when we don't start the nervous system next year is beyond me. :argh:
    "Please rate some other members before rating this member again."
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    Speaking of gunners, there's a rumour about some of the Surgical iBSc lads from Imperial last year.

    Rumour goes, that two guys doing surgery for the iBSc found out this particular "must have" text book(s) for the exams for the course. They conspired together and went and checked out every single copy of this/these book(s) from every single library campus for Imperial and kept them out for the whole year.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Speaking of gunners, there's a rumour about some of the Surgical iBSc lads from Imperial last year.

    Rumour goes, that two guys doing surgery for the iBSc found out this particular "must have" text book(s) for the exams for the course. They conspired together and went and checked out every single copy of this/these book(s) from every single library campus for Imperial and kept them out for the whole year.
    But other students must've put them on hold, therefore they can't keep the books longer than a fortnight...
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    But other students must've put them on hold, therefore they can't keep the books longer than a fortnight...
    I don't know why I didn't think of this, but I do know that it has nothing to do with the fact that I haven't checked out a book since 2009.
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    (Original post by gozatron)
    Oh god, i'm such a wasteman. Sat in my room with a stack of pharmacology notes for 6 hours and all i've accomplished is a new Doodle Jump high score. FFS I have exams in 3 weeks...!
    87,572 :smug:
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    What I plan to happen over christmas:

    1. Get fit (haven't been to the gym in too long and I have a lot of races coming up).
    2. Catch up on work (pretty much everything from this term).
    3. Write my Global Health SSC essay

    What will actually happen over Christmas:

    1. Get fat.
    2. Procrastinate
    3. Procrastinate
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    (Original post by SMed)
    I don't know why I didn't think of this, but I do know that it has nothing to do with the fact that I haven't checked out a book since 2009.
    I still have a book from semester 3. Semester 3 was 1.5 years ago. I don't even want to ask how much I owe
 
 
 
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