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    (Original post by Trainee_teach74)
    So not even the school office staff will be in?

    I'm applying for a primary teaching post.

    Just to clarify I'm applying for the actual teaching position and not for the PGCE course so UCAS won't be necessary.
    There will probably be a member of staff in school during some point in the half term, but I wouldn't rely on it. Best thing to do is to email the person in charge of the applications (usually the headteacher in my experience) and ask if it would be possible to visit the school.

    However, ideally you'd be visiting the school you're applying to during the term time. That way you get a feel for it and how the place works. If you haven't done this already and there is time before the applications close, I advise visiting during school hours.

    If you have visited, then just send the application any which way - email or post is fine, delivering it in person probably won't get you any brownie points since it'll literally be handed over to the school office and nothing else will come of it.
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    Every job application I've seen has specified in the ad how to send the app. Usually email, occasionally post. I've never heard of anyone handing it in in person, and I don't see the value of doing it.

    Either you just hand it to the office staff, or you're interrupting the slt for no real reason.
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    (Original post by Trainee_teach74)
    So not even the school office staff will be in?

    I'm applying for a primary teaching post.

    Just to clarify I'm applying for the actual teaching position and not for the PGCE course so UCAS won't be necessary.
    I don't think so, phone them Tuesday morning and check .
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    (Original post by Trainee_teach74)
    I'm doing a PGCE.

    I'm just wondering in terms of job applications who should I put as my references?

    Should they be my personal tutor on my course, a reference from a placement or a previous employer (I worked for a couple of years between undergrad and PGCE).
    For your references, your uni's handbook should have guidance on who to put. For example, at my uni, our personal tutors wrote our references but we had to put down the head of school. This is because they were checked regularly so that references could be dealt with swiftly, rather than there being a chance of it sitting in our tutor's pigeon hole for a week while they were out visiting schools etc.

    It's also a good idea to let whoever at your uni writes it know you've applied and they might expect a request soon. You can let them know (in a few lines) the key things about the job so that they can tailor the reference if they feel it's appropriate.

    For my other reference, I used my mentor from the most relevant PGCE placement. They've seen you teach and can comment on that.
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    I don't think so, why you don't give them a call on Tuesday.
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    Counting down the lessons... Only a few weeks to go... Wow, been a bloody tough year! 😂
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    I want to use the Tales of Beedle the Bard in my next Literacy topic... does anyone think that would be a problem given that I am currently teaching year 2 and 3???
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    I want to use the Tales of Beedle the Bard in my next Literacy topic... does anyone think that would be a problem given that I am currently teaching year 2 and 3???
    If the pupils are interested in Harry Potter then it sounds like you're onto a winner. Even if not I imagine it could lead to some interesting discussions. Just be sure to read the book through thoroughly to check for anything that could be inappropriate. If in doubt, ask your mentor.
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    I want to use the Tales of Beedle the Bard in my next Literacy topic... does anyone think that would be a problem given that I am currently teaching year 2 and 3???
    Unless you have a class set of the books, check carefully that you comply with the copyright regulations when copying the text. Your school should have a licence which allows a certain amount to be copied, but it's carefully stated how much you can use on the licence itself. Usually 10% of a text or no more than a chapter.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    If the pupils are interested in Harry Potter then it sounds like you're onto a winner. Even if not I imagine it could lead to some interesting discussions. Just be sure to read the book through thoroughly to check for anything that could be inappropriate. If in doubt, ask your mentor.
    Yeah, there are some bits in there which could be very inappropriate, but since both of those stories are ones that I would be more likely just to read to them instead of giving them any text versions. That way I could easily edit them to make them less horrible! Plus, some of the language might be a little complex, but if I'm reading then I can easily reword it for them. I figured it would be a more interesting text to use than the traditional fairy tales or some random folktales...

    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Unless you have a class set of the books, check carefully that you comply with the copyright regulations when copying the text. Your school should have a licence which allows a certain amount to be copied, but it's carefully stated how much you can use on the licence itself. Usually 10% of a text or no more than a chapter.
    That's really interesting! I wasn't planning on photocopying very much of it, since it is more of a speaking and listening module - I'd be reading them the stories, they'd map out the key points and then they re-tell it in their own words... Or use the morals and lessons to create their own stories. Thanks for the info!
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    Yeah, there are some bits in there which could be very inappropriate, but since both of those stories are ones that I would be more likely just to read to them instead of giving them any text versions. That way I could easily edit them to make them less horrible! Plus, some of the language might be a little complex, but if I'm reading then I can easily reword it for them. I figured it would be a more interesting text to use than the traditional fairy tales or some random folktales...



    That's really interesting! I wasn't planning on photocopying very much of it, since it is more of a speaking and listening module - I'd be reading them the stories, they'd map out the key points and then they re-tell it in their own words... Or use the morals and lessons to create their own stories. Thanks for the info!
    Sounds like a cool module, would be really interesting to compare them to traditional folk and fairy tales and see what's similar and what's different. If you haven't already, look up the home-away-home structure, qualifying tests and the actantial model. There's lots of stuff there that could perhaps be adapted down for that age group.

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Sounds like a cool module, would be really interesting to compare them to traditional folk and fairy tales and see what's similar and what's different. If you haven't already, look up the home-away-home structure, qualifying tests and the actantial model. There's lots of stuff there that could perhaps be adapted down for that age group.

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    That's really cool - I had no idea such things existed, which maybe I would have done if I'd listen to my (English Lit) flatmate at university! I might be able to make use of that...

    I had thought of making comparisons between traditional tales, since those are the ones that they will already know of. By using made up ones, I want to challenge their abilities and broaden their horizons. Plus it means a bit more Harry Potter in my life, which is always a good thing!
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    That's really cool - I had no idea such things existed, which maybe I would have done if I'd listen to my (English Lit) flatmate at university! I might be able to make use of that...

    I had thought of making comparisons between traditional tales, since those are the ones that they will already know of. By using made up ones, I want to challenge their abilities and broaden their horizons. Plus it means a bit more Harry Potter in my life, which is always a good thing!
    I only know about them from the free online course I just did on Hans Christian Andersen's stories!

    More Harry Potter is always good. Always.

    I think it's a great idea, and would be really interesting to look at what JK might be trying to say, the morals and messages, compared to old fairy tales. And could even use the bit where Dumbledore discusses how the tales were changed to be nicer to discuss that with them!

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    I only know about them from the free online course I just did on Hans Christian Andersen's stories!

    More Harry Potter is always good. Always.

    I think it's a great idea, and would be really interesting to look at what JK might be trying to say, the morals and messages, compared to old fairy tales. And could even use the bit where Dumbledore discusses how the tales were changed to be nicer to discuss that with them!

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    If I get an upper KS2 class next year (fingers crossed!) I will try and use this idea again in some way, at which point I will definitely go into detail with the Dumbledore additions. However, since I have some very low Year 2s and 3s in my class, this may well just go over their heads! Possibly as an extension idea for the more capable though...
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    Hey guys, does anyone have advice for someone with public speaking anxiety?
    I'm starting in September, but I have this ridiculous fear of being afraid to talk directly me standing in front of everyone. Once the kids are talking or getting on with work, I can talk really easily, but that beginning bit is SO hard for me, and my voice comes across completely shaky and anxious. I can talk at the end to everyone completely fine aswell, it's just the beginning and it's so annoying.

    Are there any creative ways to explain beginning concepts without having to use my voice too much, or advice for dealing with nerves or a kid calling you out on them?
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    (Original post by eelnais)
    Hey guys, does anyone have advice for someone with public speaking anxiety?
    I'm starting in September, but I have this ridiculous fear of being afraid to talk directly me standing in front of everyone. Once the kids are talking or getting on with work, I can talk really easily, but that beginning bit is SO hard for me, and my voice comes across completely shaky and anxious. I can talk at the end to everyone completely fine aswell, it's just the beginning and it's so annoying.

    Are there any creative ways to explain beginning concepts without having to use my voice too much, or advice for dealing with nerves or a kid calling you out on them?
    Hi , many people have this issue, I had did when I used to do presentation at uni, and every time it's easier than the previous one, think about it that you are not the only one and it will get better, really it will.
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    (Original post by eelnais)
    Hey guys, does anyone have advice for someone with public speaking anxiety?
    I'm starting in September, but I have this ridiculous fear of being afraid to talk directly me standing in front of everyone. Once the kids are talking or getting on with work, I can talk really easily, but that beginning bit is SO hard for me, and my voice comes across completely shaky and anxious. I can talk at the end to everyone completely fine aswell, it's just the beginning and it's so annoying.

    Are there any creative ways to explain beginning concepts without having to use my voice too much, or advice for dealing with nerves or a kid calling you out on them?
    It's all about practice, but more than that, it's attitudinal. When you believe that you have the right to be there, that you are the one in charge of your classroom and what you say goes, it comes naturally. I think we all start out feeling like a fraud and that you don't have the right to tell the kids what to do. However, you do have that right, and telling them what to do is not only what you are paid for but also what they expect, even if they don't like to think of it that way. Once you have that in your head, it becomes automatic, and body language and tone of voice carry you very far in disciplinary matters. Act as if you are confident, even when you are not, and it will become real eventually, because the kids accept you as the authority and stop challenging you on it.
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    (Original post by meme12)
    Hi , many people have this issue, I had did when I used to do presentation at uni, and every time it's easier than the previous one, think about it that you are not the only one and it will get better, really it will.
    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    It's all about practice, but more than that, it's attitudinal. When you believe that you have the right to be there, that you are the one in charge of your classroom and what you say goes, it comes naturally. I think we all start out feeling like a fraud and that you don't have the right to tell the kids what to do. However, you do have that right, and telling them what to do is not only what you are paid for but also what they expect, even if they don't like to think of it that way. Once you have that in your head, it becomes automatic, and body language and tone of voice carry you very far in disciplinary matters. Act as if you are confident, even when you are not, and it will become real eventually, because the kids accept you as the authority and stop challenging you on it.
    Thanks guys, I appreciate it. It's nice to know other people have this feeling too! Just going to have to keep telling myself I deserve to be there and I can do it.
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    (Original post by eelnais)
    Thanks guys, I appreciate it. It's nice to know other people have this feeling too! Just going to have to keep telling myself I deserve to be there and I can do it.
    Great advice above. You may completely fake the confidence/calmness and then you start believing it. And then you relax and stop thinking about it and just get on with the lesson as that's what the students want you to do.
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    (Original post by eelnais)
    Hey guys, does anyone have advice for someone with public speaking anxiety?
    I'm starting in September, but I have this ridiculous fear of being afraid to talk directly me standing in front of everyone. Once the kids are talking or getting on with work, I can talk really easily, but that beginning bit is SO hard for me, and my voice comes across completely shaky and anxious. I can talk at the end to everyone completely fine aswell, it's just the beginning and it's so annoying.

    Are there any creative ways to explain beginning concepts without having to use my voice too much, or advice for dealing with nerves or a kid calling you out on them?
    Like someone has said, it all comes with practise. It also helps that you don't have a script you make it up as you go along (at least when it comes to phrasing), secondly you get to know the class so it has the feeling of speaking to big group of friends than strangers. And finally helps that you are a lot bigger than they are.

    If it helps I hate public speaking and always get anxious before I speak. This might be because I am dyslexic and just can't read aloud well. However I find standing up in front of a class now really easy. Yes it is a bit daunting with a new class but that will quickly go.

    People always comment on this to me at church. I am on the reading list and get so anxious when I have to read for 5 mins in front of everyone, when I spend 5 hours a day, 5 hours a week speaking to classes.
 
 
 
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