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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    I still have a book from semester 3. Semester was 1.5 years ago. I don't even want to ask how much I owe
    We get charged 50p an hour overdue for short term loan books. :ninja:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    This iBSc year for me so far has been more effort than second year (which was quite a tough year for me). Half of the people on my course are intercalating after 4th year too (apparently the hardest year at BL) and even they've said this is so much more effort than that year. Obviously small sample and they are speaking retrospectively, but still fairly surprising.

    I think the difficulty with an iBSc (particularly one which isn't hardcore science) is the fact that you can't memorise or learn a mnemonic etc. to pass the exams. You read crap loads of papers and text books, and whereas these will broadly contain factual information in medicine, with Med Ed, no one (strictly speaking) is right or wrong so you end up having to read loads and loads around a topic to generally get an idea of what is going on, and then use that to formulate your opinion in an essay or an exam. That's the tough bit for me - I'm quite happy voicing my ill-informed opinions about football or strictly come dancing or whatever, but actually having a well informed opinion about education, in particular medical education, is so much more harder than I thought, and that has been my biggest suprise.

    I might just copy and paste this into my reflective portfolio I'm meant to be keeping this year. :p:
    Are you intercalating between 4th and 5th year? After speaking to other intercalaters - most of them find this year harder than Medicine so it's not just your year! Well at least life will seem simpler when we go back

    See with the Med Ed - I can completely understand the difficulty you're having because I imagine there isn't much literature available as it's on education. Perhaps you could look at management publications? One of the F1s I worked with on a small research project was quite into teaching and he said management stuff was very similar to Medical Education (he was very interested in being an NHS manager-something). But I don't really know much about that side I'm afraid. (But that is definitely reflective gold )

    My project is really scientific but a major problem is that you can't predict the way research will go. Initially we were looking into cardiac ageing after radiation... one of our assays showed there was no ageing going on (even though the pilot study showed something completely different, but that was done at different time points to patient radiation exposure) - anyhow now we're focusing on lymphocytes.

    But sometimes I feel like going into a mad panic because there isn't that structure to fall back on, like in Medicine - you have guidelines and systems in place you need to follow - and say if a patient's vitals change - you know what to do next and what obs to keep checking. With research, it's more independant thinking and fluid - there is no set structure which sort of scares me.

    I hope you are enjoying yours though would you be interested in going into teaching later on?
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    (Original post by gozatron)
    We get charged 50p an hour overdue for short term loan books. :ninja:
    Wow that is a crazy amount. Well for my overdue book - I haven't been sent any (more) emails since a year. Perhaps should just go to the librarian in a disguise and say 'oh I found this book behind the shelf - I think its been there for the last year or so...' :ninja: but it wasn't in the reading list - just got it for my SSC on 'Physiological Measurements', book is pretty good as it's on Clinical biochemistry so explains all the pathophysiology and how it would exhibit in tests like hepatic jaundice, diabetes, Cushings and so on.
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    So a guy I knew died of a PE a few weeks back but I only just found out about it. I didn't know him very well but he died at the tender age of 27 and was a very intelligent well spoken guy so it was a real shame.

    After the initial "that sucks" phase yesterday I'm not filled with the morbid curiosity of the medical student on how exactly you can die of a pulmonary embolism. He used to be quite a large guy and then lost quite a bit of weight. He never really did any exercise and was ill for about a week before so I understand he had quite a few risk factors for a clot to occur somewhere.

    However, the clot moves to the lungs and increases the pressure in the pulmonary arteries (presumably it gets stuck before it reaches the veins by getting jammed in the small arteries) and would diminish lung function but I don't see how that would kill you? People can live with one lung so I can't see how having a small section being messed up causing you to become hypoxic enough to kill you.

    So, does the build up of pressure cause the right ventricle to swell and fail? Would this then possibly tear/burst? Could the same happen to the great veins? The online articles on emedicine/wiki are pretty sketchy and vague so any help would be appreciated.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    So a guy I knew died of a PE a few weeks back but I only just found out about it. I didn't know him very well but he died at the tender age of 27 and was a very intelligent well spoken guy so it was a real shame.

    After the initial "that sucks" phase yesterday I'm not filled with the morbid curiosity of the medical student on how exactly you can die of a pulmonary embolism. He used to be quite a large guy and then lost quite a bit of weight. He never really did any exercise and was ill for about a week before so I understand he had quite a few risk factors for a clot to occur somewhere.

    However, the clot moves to the lungs and increases the pressure in the pulmonary arteries (presumably it gets stuck before it reaches the veins by getting jammed in the small arteries) and would diminish lung function but I don't see how that would kill you? People can live with one lung so I can't see how having a small section being messed up causing you to become hypoxic enough to kill you.

    So, does the build up of pressure cause the right ventricle to swell and fail? Would this then possibly tear/burst? Could the same happen to the great veins? The online articles on emedicine/wiki are pretty sketchy and vague so any help would be appreciated.
    Really sorry to hear that I feel for his family, especially with Christmas coming.

    Interesting theories - but perhaps the mechanism isn't the V/Q mismatch but more to with obstructing circulation therefore resulting in obstructive shock - circulatory failure?

    One paper I've found:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13107427 (cannot access)

    Another: http://www.ajronline.org/content/174/6/1489.full

    This one states:

    '...First, the mechanism of death from pulmonary embolism is not as straightforward as simple mechanical obstruction; other causes such as reflex and humoral mechanisms have also been implicated...'

    Another source says:

    Large emboli cause sudden death by:

    (a) lodging in major branches of pulmonary arteries or at bifurcations, causing electromechanical dissociation with rhythm but no pulse or

    (b) acute cor pulmonale (dilation of right side of heart) due to local increased resistance to blood flow, pulmonary hypertension and right sided failure


    From: http://www.pathologyoutlines.com/top...orinfarct.html (might actually bookmark this as it has all the important stuff bullet-pointed).


    Hmm I'm starting to miss Medicine.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    I still have a book from semester 3. Semester 3 was 1.5 years ago. I don't even want to ask how much I owe
    See we're not allowed to register for the returning year until all debts have been paid off, so we could be overdue for a year at max. I'm yet to have any late fees :proud:
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    I literally <3 having my xbox back.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
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    So a guy I knew died of a PE a few weeks back but I only just found out about it. I didn't know him very well but he died at the tender age of 27 and was a very intelligent well spoken guy so it was a real shame.

    After the initial "that sucks" phase yesterday I'm not filled with the morbid curiosity of the medical student on how exactly you can die of a pulmonary embolism. He used to be quite a large guy and then lost quite a bit of weight. He never really did any exercise and was ill for about a week before so I understand he had quite a few risk factors for a clot to occur somewhere.

    However, the clot moves to the lungs and increases the pressure in the pulmonary arteries (presumably it gets stuck before it reaches the veins by getting jammed in the small arteries) and would diminish lung function but I don't see how that would kill you? People can live with one lung so I can't see how having a small section being messed up causing you to become hypoxic enough to kill you.

    So, does the build up of pressure cause the right ventricle to swell and fail? Would this then possibly tear/burst? Could the same happen to the great veins? The online articles on emedicine/wiki are pretty sketchy and vague so any help would be appreciated.
    Sorry to hear about that. Grim stuff.

    As for an explanation:
    It'll depend a lot on the type of PE itself.

    Massive PEs are pretty obvious. You block off a load of the pulmonary circulation so there's little returning to the left side of the heart, leading to dramatically decreased cardiac output. Then you get reduced end organ perfusion and less blood running through the coronaries. Things are pretty straightforward with these types.

    Gets a bit murkier with the smaller ones. My understanding (which could be inaccurate; point out the inaccuracies!) is this:
    The very distal aspects of the respiratory tract are generally supplied with oxygenated blood by the pulmonary circulation (the bronchial circulation doesn't reach as distal as the alveoli). Over time you end up with necrosis of the surfactant-producing pneumocytes and general infarction of the alveoli etc., leading to alveolar collapse (= frank hypoxia and impaired oxygenation of end organs) and backing up of blood up the pulmonary circulation, leading to an acute pulmonary hypertension (potentially with subsequent oedema) and, over time, cor pulmonale.

    Point probably worth noting is that if you get one small one, your odds of becoming ill aren't necessarily that high. You'll generally just redistribute blood away from the clot site, lyse it and clear it out. You'll get sick if you get a number of smaller ones.
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    (Original post by gozatron)
    We get charged 50p an hour overdue for short term loan books. :ninja:

    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    See we're not allowed to register for the returning year until all debts have been paid off, so we could be overdue for a year at max. I'm yet to have any late fees :proud:
    We have no charges for late books :ahee:

    Now how to motivate myself to do revision? :emo:
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    *had an epiphany today when she was allowed to get her dirty hands on a transducer for a heart ultrasound for the first time*

    Amagawddd, it was so exciting! That **** actually works! *partayyyy*
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Speaking of gunners, there's a rumour about some of the Surgical iBSc lads from Imperial last year.

    Rumour goes, that two guys doing surgery for the iBSc found out this particular &quot;must have&quot; text book(s) for the exams for the course. They conspired together and went and checked out every single copy of this/these book(s) from every single library campus for Imperial and kept them out for the whole year.

    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    But other students must've put them on hold, therefore they can't keep the books longer than a fortnight...
    True but the fines cap at a low point. Would make you an epic douchebag
    Plus people never seem to hold books. I have had a textbook there is only one copy of at central for 2 months (not read) an no one has bothered to put it on hold...

    Oh I hate gunners. It is so satisfying when you beat them and then they think you are mad for wanting to be a GP.
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    I've had to return books that were being held.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Oh I hate gunners. It is so satisfying when you beat them and then they think you are mad for wanting to be a GP.
    Mate, I genuinely think GP is my calling. I started off wanting to go into Neuro, did Neuro in year 2 and hated it, so that was then scrapped. Then I was sure it was O&G, but the stressful nature of the job and fear of litigation scares me. That, and everyone will just think I'm "following daddy's footsteps" if I did do that. :/ Then I thought Anaesthesia or Emegency Med, and this really hasn't been repressed just yet, but this BSc is really making me consider becoming a GP with a special interest, most probably with something to do with teaching/education. I actually don't know what I want to do (which I suppose isn't that strange a predicament). That said, I am almost certain that I DON'T want to do Psych - it is very emotionally draining according to my sister. She does have good hours though.

    I wonder when med students decide what speciality they want to go into. I suppose there's no real rush to do so until final year/F1, but surely you could start looking into your potential speciality choice now, or am I beginning to sound like a gunner? :p:
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    Also, by gunners are you referring to the keen students who sit at the front of the lecture theatre always answering/asking questions etc? Or the uber competitive ones who are nice to you in person and then Facebook message you after every exam asking how you scored and how that compares with their score? Grrr. Annoying!
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Also, by gunners are you referring to the keen students who sit at the front of the lecture theatre always answering/asking questions etc? Or the uber competitive ones who are nice to you in person and then Facebook message you after every exam asking how you scored and how that compares with their score? Grrr. Annoying!
    It's the sneaky ones that are more annoying than the overt ones.
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Mate, I genuinely think GP is my calling. I started off wanting to go into Neuro, did Neuro in year 2 and hated it, so that was then scrapped. Then I was sure it was O&G, but the stressful nature of the job and fear of litigation scares me. That, and everyone will just think I'm "following daddy's footsteps" if I did do that. :/ Then I thought Anaesthesia or Emegency Med, and this really hasn't been repressed just yet, but this BSc is really making me consider becoming a GP with a special interest, most probably with something to do with teaching/education. I actually don't know what I want to do (which I suppose isn't that strange a predicament). That said, I am almost certain that I DON'T want to do Psych - it is very emotionally draining according to my sister. She does have good hours though.

    I wonder when med students decide what speciality they want to go into. I suppose there's no real rush to do so until final year/F1, but surely you could start looking into your potential speciality choice now, or am I beginning to sound like a gunner? :p:
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    Told myself I would be productive today and catch up on my notes for CR.

    Gone through one lecture. Only one ****ing lecture :sigh:

    Really want to get it done before we start met but can't stop procrastinating :cheers:
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    Told myself I would be productive today and catch up on my notes for CR.

    Gone through one lecture. Only one ****ing lecture :sigh:

    Really want to get it done before we start met but can't stop procrastinating :cheers:
    Haha. Don't worry :console:

    Told myself the same thing. Fell asleep after ~10 slides on medical genetics.
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    (Original post by Vulpes)
    Haha. Don't worry :console:

    Told myself the same thing. Fell asleep after ~10 slides on medical genetics.
    Common side effect of medical genetics.

    I swear in FunMed I slept through more genetics lectures than I was awake in.. and even then I wasn't exactly attentive :erm:

    Medicine would be awesome if you removed all the work
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    (Original post by Vulpes)
    Told myself the same thing. Fell asleep after ~10 slides on medical genetics.
    Is it bad that I actually enjoy genetics...
 
 
 
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