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    (Original post by Sportycb)
    Like someone has said, it all comes with practise. It also helps that you don't have a script you make it up as you go along (at least when it comes to phrasing), secondly you get to know the class so it has the feeling of speaking to big group of friends than strangers. And finally helps that you are a lot bigger than they are.

    If it helps I hate public speaking and always get anxious before I speak. This might be because I am dyslexic and just can't read aloud well. However I find standing up in front of a class now really easy. Yes it is a bit daunting with a new class but that will quickly go.

    People always comment on this to me at church. I am on the reading list and get so anxious when I have to read for 5 mins in front of everyone, when I spend 5 hours a day, 5 hours a week speaking to classes.
    Thank you, that really makes me feel better. It's so irritating! If I sound nervous I just need to power through it.
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    This is so me. I getting really anxious to begin with and not only does my voice sound shaky, I go bright red I start my primary pgce in September too xx
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    (Original post by eelnais)
    Thank you, that really makes me feel better. It's so irritating! If I sound nervous I just need to power through it.
    (Original post by jodiek28)
    This is so me. I getting really anxious to begin with and not only does my voice sound shaky, I go bright red I start my primary pgce in September too xx
    You'll all get through it. It becomes as natural to you as cleaning your teeth before long.
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    I'm starting my secondary D&T Pgce in september and was wondering how long a lesson plan should be? I'm a little worried as I saw somewhere that its around 40pages for one lesson!!
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    (Original post by Samira.j90)
    I'm starting my secondary D&T Pgce in september and was wondering how long a lesson plan should be? I'm a little worried as I saw somewhere that its around 40pages for one lesson!!
    As a trainee, mine were 2 pages. Now they're 5 lines in my planner...
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    (Original post by tory88)
    As a trainee, mine were 2 pages. Now they're 5 lines in my planner...
    Amateur. Got mine down to 'Mockingbird p70' by the end.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Amateur. Got mine down to 'Mockingbird p70' by the end.
    I think my record is "CORE PRACTICAL: Half Life Dice; Formal Write up for HW", but I will aspire to the 2 word lesson plan in the future XD
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    (Original post by tory88)
    I think my record is "CORE PRACTICAL: Half Life Dice; Formal Write up for HW", but I will aspire to the 2 word lesson plan in the future XD
    Well, I lied. It was 'M p70', really.
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    THE END IS NEAR....!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    It's over! And now the job hunt begins.

    I have a problem though, I did my training straight out of uni and have never had a job. When applying for positions what do i put in "employment"? Just leave it blank, or do i mention placement here as technically i am a volunteer.
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    (Original post by S27)
    It's over! And now the job hunt begins.

    I have a problem though, I did my training straight out of uni and have never had a job. When applying for positions what do i put in "employment"? Just leave it blank, or do i mention placement here as technically i am a volunteer.
    I put my PGCE placements under there, the PGCE itself along with undergrad etc under education. Just make sure you are very clear in the name that it's your placement. Something like Unpaid PGCE Placement 1 - Key Stage 2 or similar. Most schools will not care as long as you get the info across clearly. Just make sure there isn't a separate section for PGCE placements, in which case it should of course go there instead.

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    Hey I hope you don't mind me posting this, but I am about to start a PGCE in SEN Primary (school direct route) and would like a bit of advice.
    Firstly, I am considering getting a teachers' planner from Pirongs. Do you think it could be useful for a trainee?
    Secondly, do you have any advice on how to prepare for the course? Any books you would recommend?
    Thanks in advance! Sorry to crash your thread!
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    (Original post by Dominique95)
    Hey I hope you don't mind me posting this, but I am about to start a PGCE in SEN Primary (school direct route) and would like a bit of advice.
    Firstly, I am considering getting a teachers' planner from Pirongs. Do you think it could be useful for a trainee?
    Secondly, do you have any advice on how to prepare for the course? Any books you would recommend?
    Thanks in advance! Sorry to crash your thread!
    Some parts could definitely be useful. Others might not be so much as it's slightly different (for example, you will have more than one class of the same pupils all year, things will change on different placements and they might not have space for the different lots of info). Since you're school direct you could put your main school there and perhaps add other info in a different colour pen though?

    For preparing... relax. Enjoy some time with your family and friends. Go do some things you've wanted to do for a while. Play games, watch TV shows, watch films, read books, go on walks. The PGCE is high intensity and you will do yourself a big favour by being at your peak of wellbeing going in to it. You training provider or school may send some assignments or prep soon so you'll have those to do (and they may be along the same lines of the below).

    If you really want to prepare some more specific, practical stuff (and I don't blame you for feeling that!) see if your training provider has a reading list.

    The number one thing I'd recommend is reading books about children, including ones about disability and SEN, visiting places targeted at children, reading books FOR children (and keeping a book record so that you can go back and find them easily) and watching TV shows, films and documentaries about children. Maybe take a look at the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child http://www.crae.org.uk/media/26693/U...AE-summary.pdf

    If you really insist on some more academic stuff, these are books I'd recommend that, hopefully, you should enjoy as well as learn from! Some are based on personal experience, others that friends have enjoyed.

    Development of Independent Reading: Guppy and Hughes
    Developmental Psychology & Early Childhood Education: David Whitebread
    Tell Me Another: storytelling and reading aloud at home, at school and in the community: B Barton


    Lastly, if you want you can brush up on some basics. Perhaps read a book like 'Reading Under Control' which will give you a basic overview of synthetic phonics and teaching reading, or just read Letters and Sounds (a now unused government document setting out a full synthetic phonics program, still available online here https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...00281-2007.pdf), or maybe a maths one (there are several targeted at trainee teachers) or a science one if those are skills you'd like to develop more. EDIT: Just remembered, these documents are good and short, very handing when teaching: Universally Speaking a summary of typical speech and language development at different ages https://www.thecommunicationtrust.or...-speaking.aspx

    Lastly, if you want a really heavy (and probably depressing, considering current government policy) read but pretty decent summary of a huge amount of research then you could look at the Cambridge Primary Review.

    Seriously, the main one is relax, and think about children, as people.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Some parts could definitely be useful. Others might not be so much as it's slightly different (for example, you will have more than one class of the same pupils all year, things will change on different placements and they might not have space for the different lots of info). Since you're school direct you could put your main school there and perhaps add other info in a different colour pen though?

    For preparing... relax. Enjoy some time with your family and friends. Go do some things you've wanted to do for a while. Play games, watch TV shows, watch films, read books, go on walks. The PGCE is high intensity and you will do yourself a big favour by being at your peak of wellbeing going in to it. You training provider or school may send some assignments or prep soon so you'll have those to do (and they may be along the same lines of the below).

    If you really want to prepare some more specific, practical stuff (and I don't blame you for feeling that!) see if your training provider has a reading list.

    The number one thing I'd recommend is reading books about children, including ones about disability and SEN, visiting places targeted at children, reading books FOR children (and keeping a book record so that you can go back and find them easily) and watching TV shows, films and documentaries about children. Maybe take a look at the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child http://www.crae.org.uk/media/26693/U...AE-summary.pdf

    If you really insist on some more academic stuff, these are books I'd recommend that, hopefully, you should enjoy as well as learn from! Some are based on personal experience, others that friends have enjoyed.

    Development of Independent Reading: Guppy and Hughes
    Developmental Psychology & Early Childhood Education: David Whitebread
    Tell Me Another: storytelling and reading aloud at home, at school and in the community: B Barton


    Lastly, if you want you can brush up on some basics. Perhaps read a book like 'Reading Under Control' which will give you a basic overview of synthetic phonics and teaching reading, or just read Letters and Sounds (a now unused government document setting out a full synthetic phonics program, still available online here https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...00281-2007.pdf), or maybe a maths one (there are several targeted at trainee teachers) or a science one if those are skills you'd like to develop more. EDIT: Just remembered, these documents are good and short, very handing when teaching: Universally Speaking a summary of typical speech and language development at different ages https://www.thecommunicationtrust.or...-speaking.aspx

    Lastly, if you want a really heavy (and probably depressing, considering current government policy) read but pretty decent summary of a huge amount of research then you could look at the Cambridge Primary Review.

    Seriously, the main one is relax, and think about children, as people.
    Thank you so much!!
    You made some very good points. I'll take your advice on board. Thanks for being so detailed in your reponse, I really appreciate it.
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    (Original post by Dominique95)
    Thank you so !!
    You made some very good points. I'll take your advice on board. Thanks for being so detailed in your reponse, I really appreciate it.
    I'm going to second that. Get some rest. It's going to be a massive part of your life soon so make good use of your free time now.
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    I had a question at a job interview that threw me off the other day:

    What reading/mathematics schemes have you used.

    At my school we used talk for writing and the numeracy hour.

    I'm wondering what other schemes are there that they are looking for?
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    (Original post by Trainee_teach74)
    I had a question at a job interview that threw me off the other day:

    What reading/mathematics schemes have you used.

    At my school we used talk for writing and the numeracy hour.

    I'm wondering what other schemes are there that they are looking for?
    Some others I've heard of are the BIG WRITE for literacy, where children do an extended piece of writing every week based around a topic they've been studying; Singapore Maths/Maths Mastery programmes. Possibly Hamilton plans, which produce whole schemes of work for a year group for an entire year.

    But if I'd had an interview with this question, I would generally have had to say that I had heard of a few, but hadn't had a huge amount of experience using them, as my main placement school prefers to work from a long term plan that is personalised to work for our children, and don't use schemes of work.
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    (Original post by Trainee_teach74)
    I had a question at a job interview that threw me off the other day:

    What reading/mathematics schemes have you used.

    At my school we used talk for writing and the numeracy hour.

    I'm wondering what other schemes are there that they are looking for?
    They were probably seeking to find out if you have experience of working with some of the schemes they use, although I doubt this would give a candidate a significant advantage. There are a ton of maths schemes around: Abacus, Maths No Problem, Collins Busy Ants, Broadbent, Cambridge to name just a few, however, some schools use their own schemes of work rather than buying into one. It sounds like this is what your school does. Every school that I have worked in thus far has used a different scheme to the others.

    In regards to reading schemes, most schools tie their approach to reading in with whichever phonics scheme they follow: Read, Write Inc, Jolly Phonics etc. A lot of schools buy books from schemes but do not necessarily follow the scheme itself. The Biff, Chip and Kipper books are from the Oxford Reading Tree scheme. The Project X Code books form another scheme for older children. You may also have come across books from Scholastic's PM scheme. Some schools buy into programmes like Accelerated Reader, Oxford Owl or guided reading schemes like Bug Club and Oxford Big Cat.

    Essentially, there was no right or wrong answer to that question. You can only honestly outline how you have experienced teaching maths and reading thus far, which may not have involved the use of any commercial schemes. Demonstrating some awareness of the range of approaches and schemes around never hurts though.
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    I'm going to be starting my PGCE Primary (School Direct) in September. Thanks for the advice given previously about how to prepare! Can any of you ex-trainees think of anything we should be buying before the course starts, e.g, stationery?! Thanks.

    Congratulations to all of you completing your course this year
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    (Original post by alymau)
    I'm going to be starting my PGCE Primary (School Direct) in September. Thanks for the advice given previously about how to prepare! Can any of you ex-trainees think of anything we should be buying before the course starts, e.g, stationery?! Thanks.

    Congratulations to all of you completing your course this year
    Whilst getting the keys to the stationery cupboard is indeed a prime motivation for many in becoming a teacher, you are better off waiting until you start to see what you really need, otherwise you'll waste a lot of money. On the other hand, stationery is a lifelong joy, so you'd probably find a use for what you got eventually.
 
 
 
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