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    (Original post by alymau)
    I'm going to be starting my PGCE Primary (School Direct) in September. Thanks for the advice given previously about how to prepare! Can any of you ex-trainees think of anything we should be buying before the course starts, e.g, stationery?! Thanks.

    Congratulations to all of you completing your course this year
    Lever Arch files and highlighters are both things I didn't appreciate until beginning my PGCE. You may want a teacher's planner (some training providers will give you one) but I'd hold off until you begin your first placement as there are often some spares floating around.
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    I cant say I needed anything particularly unusual for the pgce. A stapler, a hole punch, pens, paper and a few ringbinders and lever arches was all I used. I love stationery but pgce didn't need much.

    A lot of schools ban pupils from using rubbers these days, so I found having my own was handy when they were doing things that really needed them (you can pry that rubber out of my cold dead hands when year ones are drawing times on clock faces).
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    Hi!

    I'm about to start my Primary PGCE year on Monday (eeek!) I'm very nervous (but excited) after spending the best part of today reading through many pages of this thread, which probably hasn't helped the nerves haha! I'm anticipating this year to be extremely hectic, stressful, busy etc so am under no illusion that it will be easy, I just hope that it will be worthwhile and also mainly enjoyable!

    So, is anyone else in the same position and about to start their PGCE's? Or does anyone have any advice/tips which would be greatly appreciated!
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    had a conditional offer which is to pass my GCSE English, I got my result on the 25th Aug but my UCAS status never been updated, does anyone know why?
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    (Original post by meme12)
    had a conditional offer which is to pass my GCSE English, I got my result on the 25th Aug but my UCAS status never been updated, does anyone know why?
    Perhaps UCAS or the university haven't seen your result? Drop the admissions department a quick e-mail as they may be waiting on you to send proof.
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    I did and I sent it to them again, could be the reason that I don't have the certificate yet and because I only have provisional statement?
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    (Original post by meme12)
    I did and I sent it to them again, could be the reason that I don't have the certificate yet and because I only have provisional statement?
    Unlikely, they'll be aware that certificates don't come through until later. The best advice is to call/e-mail the university and ask what is happening - likely there will be a clerical error somewhere along the line.
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    Loving the stationery chat - as I've got a bit of a habit.
    I've invested in a 4-hole punch and ink pens for note taking (much easier on the hand).
    I've wanted a 4-hole punch for ages - any excuse. On my prelim attachment I found an A2 paper guillotine - nearly blew my mind!
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    (Original post by linkdapink)
    Hope you're alright lol!

    I'm doing the MEC at the moment (Maths Enhancement Course), so have all the fun of the PGCE next year!

    Good Luck and have a good Christmas!
    Am meant to be starting the MEC in January, how are you finding it? What degree did you do? I will be leaving an accounts job to go into teaching and relocating. As well as my bf getting a transfer to come with me. Trying to decide what to do
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    I teach my first full lesson (well, of the PGCE) on Tuesday, which I'm really looking forward to, then pick up all my year 7 classes next week. The only thing that's bothering me slightly is how much work purely for the uni I have to do. I don't begrudge the incredibly detailed lesson plans, as frankly I fully accept that I've a long way to go before I'm at my mentor's 'write a few notes on a post it note and call it a lesson plan' level (let alone the HoD's 'wing it and see what happens' approach).

    There just seems to be a continuing drip of extra things to do from the uni in terms of what needs doing for assignments or even pre-lecture tasks. I've spent the last nine years working in a job that required a lot of paperwork, I'm good at paperwork, but I suspect this year the uni work is going to drive me closer to insanity than the teaching ever will.

    How's everyone else doing so far?
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    (Original post by JaneBaratheon)
    I teach my first full lesson (well, of the PGCE) on Tuesday, which I'm really looking forward to, then pick up all my year 7 classes next week. The only thing that's bothering me slightly is how much work purely for the uni I have to do. I don't begrudge the incredibly detailed lesson plans, as frankly I fully accept that I've a long way to go before I'm at my mentor's 'write a few notes on a post it note and call it a lesson plan' level (let alone the HoD's 'wing it and see what happens' approach).

    There just seems to be a continuing drip of extra things to do from the uni in terms of what needs doing for assignments or even pre-lecture tasks. I've spent the last nine years working in a job that required a lot of paperwork, I'm good at paperwork, but I suspect this year the uni work is going to drive me closer to insanity than the teaching ever will.

    How's everyone else doing so far?
    In teaching there will always be something else to do. The skill is in seeing what is most important. At this stage, lesson planning and delivery is most important, then marking, then university tasks. The most important this is to be a good teacher, everything else is secondary.
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    (Original post by JaneBaratheon)
    I teach my first full lesson (well, of the PGCE) on Tuesday, which I'm really looking forward to, then pick up all my year 7 classes next week. The only thing that's bothering me slightly is how much work purely for the uni I have to do. I don't begrudge the incredibly detailed lesson plans, as frankly I fully accept that I've a long way to go before I'm at my mentor's 'write a few notes on a post it note and call it a lesson plan' level (let alone the HoD's 'wing it and see what happens' approach).

    There just seems to be a continuing drip of extra things to do from the uni in terms of what needs doing for assignments or even pre-lecture tasks. I've spent the last nine years working in a job that required a lot of paperwork, I'm good at paperwork, but I suspect this year the uni work is going to drive me closer to insanity than the teaching ever will.

    How's everyone else doing so far?
    As tory888 says, there is plenty of stuff to do once you qualify! I've survived a month as an NQT, during which I've been handed more bits of paper that possibly relate to my class than I can recall! Many of them have been put in my cupboard with the intention of dealing with them. But I'm never in a position to sort out the cupboard or the papers because I have that many other things to do.

    You learn to prioritise. Always plan your lessons and put your best effort into delivering and then marking them. But unless you are on salaried School Direct(?), you are generally given time for PGCE essays and assignments where you don't have to be in school. We were given two "reading days" before every deadline (although by then it was a bit late to be doing the reading, you needed to be most of the way through the writing by that point!), which were quite useful.

    You'll be surprised how quickly you adapt to doing lesson plans - even if you continue to do them in a lot of detail, you will get quicker at them. At my school, my plans still have to be fairly detailed, because we are expected to submit them for scrutiny every 3/4 weeks, but I don't mind it at all. I'm finding myself increasingly surprised at how quickly I can plan a week of maths and English lessons!

    In the meantime, don't stress about all the things you have to do. Just enjoy everything as much as you can - and maybe resign yourself to the fact that, for now, your weekends/week nights might not be entirely your own! Welcome to teaching
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    I'm 2 weeks into my SCITT course, but I'm doing a PGCE too at level 7 (Masters). The only problem I'm currently having is what to do my first assignment on as I don't know the school's priorities.

    I'm loving being in school, though and can't wait to get stuck in with the teaching. I'm training for Maths in secondary school.

    somethingbeautiful I've come straight from a BSc and there is a level 6 version of the PGCE (Professional rather than Post-Graduate Certificate of Education) that is undergrad level. I think it will be based more on your work ethic. I did a project/dissertation and think that that has helped to prepare me for PGCE work. If you've done academic research for a paper/essay, then you'll be better equipped for it than if you hadn't.

    Obviously, I'm only just starting the course - I may hate it in another 2 weeks, but I doubt that.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    In teaching there will always be something else to do. The skill is in seeing what is most important. At this stage, lesson planning and delivery is most important, then marking, then university tasks. The most important this is to be a good teacher, everything else is secondary.
    (Original post by beanbrain)
    As tory888 says, there is plenty of stuff to do once you qualify! I've survived a month as an NQT, during which I've been handed more bits of paper that possibly relate to my class than I can recall! Many of them have been put in my cupboard with the intention of dealing with them. But I'm never in a position to sort out the cupboard or the papers because I have that many other things to do.

    You learn to prioritise. Always plan your lessons and put your best effort into delivering and then marking them.
    Definitely this! It took me literally an entire year to sort out the two cupboards full to the brim I inherited in my NQT classroom. There was always something more urgent I could do, until I had to have the room ready for someone else and didn't want to leave that for them!!
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    First uni observation on Tuesday. With one of my worst classes, naturally.
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    I'm also a few months in to the PGCE, the workload isn't ridiculous, what you are all describing is pretty normal for a lot of jobs. I started my PGCE after 7 years in industry where it was fairly normal to start at 8 and not get home until 8 or 9pm.

    I have to say I am having problems though and I'm seriously now considering whether teaching is for me in the long term. I am working these hours - which are nothing different from what I'm used to and I went in with full expectations of working long hours, but I'm just feeling really demoralised. Everyone else on my course keep talking about what a great time they are having in school, whereas I'm just not. There's nothing wrong with the school/mentor/kids/workload... I'm actually really finding it hard to put my finger on it and seriously wondering if I have depression as I have cried every single day for the last week, I'm just feeling like I'm not good enough to be a teacher or that's it's not for me. I'm almost also feeling like I'm bored, even though I have so much to do, and so much to improve on and I'm still only a 4a. My previous job was incredibly flexible and teaching really isn't and also knowing that my first year in teaching will be a massive pay cut from what I previously earnt, both of which I think has contributed to the stress of it all, on top of the fact that I'm constantly ill. I'm also starting to realise that teachers are really treated badly. In my previous work if you produced a good piece of work or did someone a favour, you would get a thanks or some sort of praise, whereas here I'm not really seeing it, I kinda of feel like teachers are just like cogs in some kind of school factory - go in, work all the hours with out a minute to yourself - go home.

    I don't really want to quit my PGCE and I really want to stick it out as I'm not a quitter. I think even just in the last few weeks I have improved so many qualities which will be useful later. However, I don't think a proper teaching job is for me and unless I really love my next placement, I'll be either considering supply work or looking into graduate schemes in a new sector.

    Anyways - I know this is a bit of a pessimistic post, but I just needed to tell someone and I really don't want to bring the morale of my friends down.
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    (Original post by JaneBaratheon)
    First uni observation on Tuesday. With one of my worst classes, naturally.
    Be sure that you note the reputation and prior behaviour of the class on your lesson plan somewhere, and detail what you have been attempting in order to control them. Observers know that some classes can be tough, and if you contextualise this for them and demonstrate that you are implementing strategies to deal with this you will be fine.
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    (Original post by pgce113)
    I'm also a few months in to the PGCE, the workload isn't ridiculous, what you are all describing is pretty normal for a lot of jobs. I started my PGCE after 7 years in industry where it was fairly normal to start at 8 and not get home until 8 or 9pm.

    I have to say I am having problems though and I'm seriously now considering whether teaching is for me in the long term. I am working these hours - which are nothing different from what I'm used to and I went in with full expectations of working long hours, but I'm just feeling really demoralised. Everyone else on my course keep talking about what a great time they are having in school, whereas I'm just not. There's nothing wrong with the school/mentor/kids/workload... I'm actually really finding it hard to put my finger on it and seriously wondering if I have depression as I have cried every single day for the last week, I'm just feeling like I'm not good enough to be a teacher or that's it's not for me. I'm almost also feeling like I'm bored, even though I have so much to do, and so much to improve on and I'm still only a 4a. My previous job was incredibly flexible and teaching really isn't and also knowing that my first year in teaching will be a massive pay cut from what I previously earnt, both of which I think has contributed to the stress of it all, on top of the fact that I'm constantly ill. I'm also starting to realise that teachers are really treated badly. In my previous work if you produced a good piece of work or did someone a favour, you would get a thanks or some sort of praise, whereas here I'm not really seeing it, I kinda of feel like teachers are just like cogs in some kind of school factory - go in, work all the hours with out a minute to yourself - go home.

    I don't really want to quit my PGCE and I really want to stick it out as I'm not a quitter. I think even just in the last few weeks I have improved so many qualities which will be useful later. However, I don't think a proper teaching job is for me and unless I really love my next placement, I'll be either considering supply work or looking into graduate schemes in a new sector.

    Anyways - I know this is a bit of a pessimistic post, but I just needed to tell someone and I really don't want to bring the morale of my friends down.
    This is a tough time of year for everyone in teaching, and it is OK to be feeling the way you do!!

    As an NQT in a primary setting, I have been feeling similar myself - like I'm not doing enough for the kids, in spite of the 60 hour weeks I am consistently putting in. The fact that I am the first one there most mornings and the last one there, aside from the headteacher and the caretaker, still didn't feel like I'm doing a good enough job. Fortunately, when I discussed this with my mentor, she showed me some data and looked at some of the books with me, reassuring me that I was doing OK.

    However, I am very lucky to have someone who takes the time to listen to me and help me. Without the other teachers at my school, I would be feeling much, much worse than I have been. We're a small school and so there aren't many of us, but we have really good relationships and know exactly who to go to for which support. I think this is a really key part of teaching - making sure that you have a good support network both at school and at home. Having friends who know how I'm feeling because they have felt it themselves makes my life so much better when I can have a rant Similarly, the right team of teachers in a school means that your work is appreciated - I actually cannot count the times in even just 7 or 8 weeks that someone from the SLT has told me that I'm doing really well, or complimented some aspect of my teaching practise. Yes, some teachers are treated badly - but not all!

    In terms of feeling bored... can't say I've felt that since I started teaching! Except for one day so far, when we had to do maths all day... that day, it was confirmed to me that I am cut out more for Primary than Secondary, because I get to teach so many different subjects instead of just one or two all day long! Is it possible that the boredom is linked to just having one subject?

    Alternatively, it is important to make sure that you can have fun in your lessons, and if you have fun then your students are likely to respond positively to it, which will show in your teaching, progress, assessment etc. etc. Maybe something for you to focus on would be planning lessons that are fun for you? That might help with so many of the negative feelings you are having

    Keep going - even if teaching isn't for you in the end, there are so many positives that you could take away from the PGCE year if you stick at it.
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    (Original post by pgce113)
    I'm also a few months in to the PGCE, the workload isn't ridiculous, what you are all describing is pretty normal for a lot of jobs. I started my PGCE after 7 years in industry where it was fairly normal to start at 8 and not get home until 8 or 9pm.

    I have to say I am having problems though and I'm seriously now considering whether teaching is for me in the long term. I am working these hours - which are nothing different from what I'm used to and I went in with full expectations of working long hours, but I'm just feeling really demoralised. Everyone else on my course keep talking about what a great time they are having in school, whereas I'm just not. There's nothing wrong with the school/mentor/kids/workload... I'm actually really finding it hard to put my finger on it and seriously wondering if I have depression as I have cried every single day for the last week, I'm just feeling like I'm not good enough to be a teacher or that's it's not for me. I'm almost also feeling like I'm bored, even though I have so much to do, and so much to improve on and I'm still only a 4a. My previous job was incredibly flexible and teaching really isn't and also knowing that my first year in teaching will be a massive pay cut from what I previously earnt, both of which I think has contributed to the stress of it all, on top of the fact that I'm constantly ill. I'm also starting to realise that teachers are really treated badly. In my previous work if you produced a good piece of work or did someone a favour, you would get a thanks or some sort of praise, whereas here I'm not really seeing it, I kinda of feel like teachers are just like cogs in some kind of school factory - go in, work all the hours with out a minute to yourself - go home.

    I don't really want to quit my PGCE and I really want to stick it out as I'm not a quitter. I think even just in the last few weeks I have improved so many qualities which will be useful later. However, I don't think a proper teaching job is for me and unless I really love my next placement, I'll be either considering supply work or looking into graduate schemes in a new sector.

    Anyways - I know this is a bit of a pessimistic post, but I just needed to tell someone and I really don't want to bring the morale of my friends down.
    Although it doesn't seem like there's anything wrong with your current placement, it could be that it's just not suited to you as a teacher. The school that you're in can make a huge difference to how you feel about teaching, so if you feel comfortable doing this I'd definitely advise trying out the second placement too.

    I absolutely know what you mean about the thanks/recognition for your work. Sadly, in most of the education sector (from what I've seen), it's taken as a given that you will give above and beyond and always put work first, do extra, and almost never does anyone say 'It was really good that you stepped up and did that'. It's just expected, and if you don't do it you fall behind and get in trouble. Not that everyone in charge doesn't recognise the good work, it's just that it's done so much that it doesn't 'stand out' and people have no time or resources to really recognise it. If you do something really well, usually it will result in being asked to do more because you're good at it (without an increase in pay, new title, more time to do it etc). I didn't notice it so much when teaching but having moved on to another job where my boss will say to me directly 'Thank you for doing that. We think it's really great that you did this, keep it up.' and maybe I'll get a pay rise. I know that extra effort I put in is appreciated, rather than simply required.

    You might like to find someone to talk to in person about how you're feeling... it could help you work your feelings out and, if you're concerned about possible depression it could help re-assure you or let you get help. I certainly felt very down at times when training, but not in the same way as I would have with depression (at least, as I understand it, not having suffered with it personally). You could speak to your GP, confide in a friend, family member or tutor (the tutors will have seen these sorts of feelings before and can probably re-assure you) or you could call a helpline such as the Education Support Partnership https://www.educationsupportpartnership.org.uk/ (contains what used to be the Teacher Support Network, providing support and a listening ear for teachers feeling like they need someone to talk to).
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    A few months ago I posted about my public speaking anxiety. I went to the doctor's, was diagnosed with anxiety and sorted myself out with a prescription for Propranolol, expecting to have to use it all year every lesson - and now I only take it when my anxiety is particularly bad, or if I have an observation, so only twice this past month so far!

    I am really enjoying teaching and although it can be long and stressful, and the kids can be tough, I am so pleased I went and dealt with it, and I am getting better everyday.

    Hope everyone's second half term is going well
 
 
 
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