Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Would you be doing your degree at your chosen uni at £10k a year? Watch

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    No. I would have taken a year as an au pair in France and Italy, done a training scheme in TEFL and in 2 and half years I will be even higher than the standard in four years. I'd spend a couple of years teaching adults in a college, or move and teach English abroad. I could then do a teaching course with a school, rather than going to uni Must faster and much cheaper.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yeah too right
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    There's loads of grads who are unemployed or do lame jobs; the unemployed list isn't even accurate, because I know grads who don't claim benefits, yet they are unemployed. They don't want to face the shame of it. In those 3-4 years, time could have been spent far more productively IMO.

    One has to wonder whether degree's make logical sense; spending several years learning a specific branch of academia, only to then try and get a totally unrelated job afterwards, does seem a puzzling concept. I don't get why the government want grads to learn stuff only for it to go down the drain. If you're not bright, hardworking etc by 18/19 then uni won't fix it for you.

    You can talk about grad jobs and so forth, but the actual % of total grads who land one of these is very low. And even some of these grad jobs are a 'joke' when you check them out. So the % who land relevant, quality grad jobs is even lower.
    Well you cant argue that for the lucky few who do get relevant good graduate jobs the whole uni experience is totally worth it for them. Disregarding vocational uni courses, im talking about jobs in the city, people who do economics degrees, science degrees, business and management etc. These people are the lucky ones.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TomInce6666)
    Well you cant argue that for the lucky few who do get relevant good graduate jobs the whole uni experience is totally worth it for them. Disregarding vocational uni courses, im talking about jobs in the city, people who do economics degrees, science degrees, business and management etc. These people are the lucky ones.
    Well, lucky is a 'funny' word, I know what you're saying though. Moreso a good series of choices and perspective; perhaps luck based on good advice and opportunities given though, and obviously there needs to be an element of luck in life as with anything.

    In terms of a general policy for all students though, the idea of a degree seems quite stupid when you think about it pragmatically. The idea of doing a Maths degree only to do a totally unrelated, non-requisite finance job doesn't make any sense. 3-4 years of learning proofs and doing problem sheets just to be washed away. A very bizarre and wasteful concept.

    The more the university debate rages on, the more it seems that university should just become something for those who actually NEED it; and the system should adapt to reflect that. Lawyers yes, Doctors yes, Scientists yes, Professors yes. But any old degree just to venture into the world and find any old job ... no. Something's seriously amiss.

    In any case, I've wondered why they can't just give students the option of learning stuff online rather than paying tuition and accommodation fees. For a lot of students they prefer, or end up, self-learning. I think a lot of students would like the idea of this, if we brush aside the social aspect.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    While I agree with what you sare saying Physics Enemy, the problem is that many many jobs in the country these days do ask for a degree. Not a specific one, but they do ask that you have been to university and have got a degree. So you can't really blame the students and graduates for just doing what the employers want.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    Well, lucky is a 'funny' word, I know what you're saying though. Moreso a good series of choices and perspective; perhaps luck based on good advice and opportunities given though, and obviously there needs to be an element of luck in life as with anything.

    In terms of a general policy for all students though, the idea of a degree seems quite stupid when you think about it pragmatically. The idea of doing a Maths degree only to do a totally unrelated, non-requisite finance job doesn't make any sense. 3-4 years of learning proofs and doing problem sheets just to be washed away. A very bizarre and wasteful concept.

    The more the university debate rages on, the more it seems that university should just become something for those who actually NEED it; and the system should adapt to reflect that. Lawyers yes, Doctors yes, Scientists yes, Professors yes. But any old degree just to venture into the world and find any old job ... no. Something's seriously amiss.

    In any case, I've wondered why they can't just give students the option of learning stuff online rather than paying tuition and accommodation fees. For a lot of students they prefer, or end up, self-learning. I think a lot of students would like the idea of this, if we brush aside the social aspect.
    Yeah, I agree. But on your last point, dont we have this already? The Open University?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.