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David Cameron - "Before protesting, students need to get the facts straight." Watch

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    (Original post by Square)
    instead of EMA why dont they give them free bus passes, book tokens and stationary vouchers, since these are what EMA is meant to be for, not clothes, DVDs and going out.
    Stop generalising.
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    (Original post by TheCount.)
    What sorts of crimes will these bed ridden delinquents be committing exactly? I think they will find any deviant activities quite difficult to commit from the confines of their bed...
    Alot and possibly are there, do you not know your english?

    its called a figure of speech u bafoon

    and to be honest, i know alot of people who are bed ridden ie lazy yet still have the ability to commit crimes. drug dealing is a prime example

    :bye:
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    (Original post by AidyD)
    Right... So Cameron is saying that instead of levying a large tax on the banks that caused and profiteered from the financial recession... He is instead going to triple the overall cost of attending higher education in our country.

    The only justification he is spouting - We have no choice, its either this or that. That in itself is a lie to trick people into thinking they are making a smart decision by evaluating both choices properly.

    The reality is.... There are more than two choices. Look deeper ffs.
    Yeah why are they scared of taxing banks again. Everyone withdraw you're savings, if you have any, we're students lol. This is what Cantona said, make the banks want us and do everything for us!! C*nts
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    (Original post by bj_945)
    But I do think students are deliberately ignoring the fact that there's a student loan in place covering all fees.
    Ah. I'll keep that in mind when my £25k career development loan fails to cover the £36,000 that I may now have to pay upfront to study graduate medicine.
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    Like many of this thread wanted to agree that in my opinion the cuts are fair. I realise i won't be someone who has to face them but I don't understand how students feel they should be special and not subjected to the cuts. If they weren't altering uni fees then money would have to come from else where eg the NHS or disability allowances. No one is being stopped going to university as all it is is increased tax after you leave university which seems reasonable. Why should everyone else pay for you to do a degree to earn more, as on average graduates own more than the average salary in this country (if that statement is wrong I apologise).
    Equally seems unfair to put all this blame on the coliation when it wasn't them who got us in this mess they are trying to fix it (just using unpopular means)
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    Great excuse Dave! Now they'll stop!
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    (Original post by TedleyBear)
    Alot and possibly are there, do you not know your english?

    its called a figure of speech u bafoon

    and to be honest, i know alot of people who are bed ridden ie lazy yet still have the ability to commit crimes. drug dealing is a prime example

    :bye:
    Bedridden : ' confined to bed (by illness)'. It strikes me as somewhat arduous to deal drugs when one is unable to move from their bed.

    I can't believe you have the audacity to question my English, when you speak so unintelligibly.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Ah. I'll keep that in mind when my £25k career development loan fails to cover the £36,000 that I may now have to pay upfront to study graduate medicine.
    Yeh, but that's a graduate degree.
    Graduate degrees have always been a nightmare to fund. Nothing new here :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by bj_945)
    Yeh, but that's a graduate degree.
    Graduate degrees have always been a nightmare to fund. Nothing new here :rolleyes:
    It's an undergraduate degree. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by The_Great_One)
    Well i think students are making a mistake protesting. What would they rather have higher tuition fees...or some poorer universities closing down full stop...
    The latter, surely. Poorer Universities are more likely (not definitely) to be the lower standard ones. By closing the worst 'Universities', if they can be called such, savings would be made meaning the higher standard ones can remain open, fees can remain low, and, in conjunction with a general increase in entry requirements, means the smartest, and not the richest, get to excellent Universities; surely everyone wins with this fair route.
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    I know its slightly off topic I just felt people should see how Fox "News" reported the protests

    http://www.leftfootforward.org/2010/...big-government

    "rebellion against big Government and high taxes is resonating in Ye Olde England…”

    Why report news when you can make it up eh?
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    I dont like clegg, cable and cameron assuming that everyone who is unhappy doesnt understand the changes.

    We do understand the changes and can see through all the spin they are trying to put on it.
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    More for less, Dave, I think I get it...
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    (Original post by TedleyBear)
    I agree but this is not the point I am making, since students have started to recieve ema, lower classes and sometimes higher classes see it as a incentive to go to college since we have become so technologically lazy

    If your going to cut something which is making people go to college ( yes to spend on whatever they want, but they are used to it now ) then you need to provide incentives to do other things or if you wish them, or lower ages, to continue to go to college
    this is now annoying me.
    why should they pay people to go to college as an incentive? i go to college too and it annoys the hell out of me how i know that a lot of them wouldn't even be there if it wasn't for EMA.
    these people don't actually want an education and they're wasting now precious places that could be used for people that actually want an education, not £30 a week to spend at the weekend.
    i'd like to see the college student numbers fall if they did bring in a system of vouchers.

    anyway. this is irrelevant as i'm pretty sure they're scrapping EMA.

    also, you/your/you're
    DIFFERENT WORDS

    but back to the point of tutition fees, if there's cuts, there have to be increases. i'd rather pay more if it means the actual education i'm getting at least stays at the esame standard. if the standard falls and i'm still paying up to £9,000, THEN i'll be pissed. it's also pissed me off how the Lib Dems said they're scrap - NOT EVEN LOWER - SCRAP tutition fees. gesuheriuhgsoeurghosuregs.
    also how Scotland still don't have to pay.

    meh. at the end of the day, you get a degree to get a good career. if you want that degree, it won't matter to you.
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    Those students are angry at the rise in tuition fees and the amount of debt they are going to be in when they leave uni, however I think the biggest reason as to why students are angry is because they were lied to by nick clegg.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    It's an undergraduate degree. :dontknow:
    "to study graduate medicine"+already studying a BsC in Psychology?

    Well I apologise, but you can understand where the confusion arose from.

    Are you not quallifying for a loan because it's your second undergrad degree?
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    (Original post by ilovemykitten)
    The graduate tax system is a separate thing. The state (so to speak) provides a good - a degree. The degree is purchased by the student. Different students benefit differently from their degree - just like different people have different uses for their computers. However the PRICE of the degree, or the computer, should and must remain the same to ALL.

    And again, let me repeat - if the reason why one person cannot extract much use of their degree is NOT their fault , this can be accounted for by taxing them less/giving them benefits. But in some cases, the fault is not situational - it is because the person is lazy, unmotivated, and unambitious - because they chose to flunk their seminars, not turn up to their lectures. That is their fault, and they should face it.
    I understand and appreciate almost your entire argument. In many respects, it makes sense - I wouldn't pay more for a sofa because I use it more than someone else, so why should I pay more for a degree if I get more benefit out of it than someone else? I think the argument against is purely practical - how are you going to expect people to afford to pay the same if they're on a low income?

    That aside, what I don't understand about your argument is that the graduate tax would be in some way better. In fact, surely the graduate tax would be significantly worse? If person A earns £200k and person B earns £150k, then both of them pay the same amount in the end, just person B takes longer to pay it. Obviously, you get to a certain threshold (I forget what it is) where it stops being the same. But with graduate tax, how much you pay towards your degree always reflects what you earn. You pay a percentage of your salary, much like you do under the current system, but you NEVER pay it off. So somebody who earns more is bound to pay more. That's the only part of your argument I don't understand.
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    (Original post by bj_945)
    "to study graduate medicine"+already studying a BsC in Psychology?

    Well I apologise, but you can understand where the confusion arose from.

    Are you not quallifying for a loan because it's your second undergrad degree?
    Yes, but having a degree is a prerequisite.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Ah. I'll keep that in mind when my £25k career development loan fails to cover the £36,000 that I may now have to pay upfront to study graduate medicine.
    Well you could always apply as a graduate to the undergraduate programme, for which - if I recall correctly - you will now get full loans? But that may not be ideal, and I agree its wrong to make students pay upfront for any degree, and I hope this will be upheld by the government with regards to graduate medicine.

    I think they will really shoot themselves in the foot if they charge people upfront for even just year 1 on the 4-year course, as they do now - £9000 is way too much to ask people to pay upfront.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Yes, but having a degree is a prerequisite.
    Then by definition how can it be undergraduate. That definition being:

    "A college or university student who has not yet received a bachelor's or similar degree."
 
 
 
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