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    (Original post by Xhotas)
    You've got 3 "Hard" Subjects and Psychology. You'd be fine.

    But I recommend picking something else if you want to do psychology, no uni will accept you if you have an A Level in psychology.
    Haha I beg to differ, several of my friends went to uni this year doing psychology and they all had an A level in it.
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    (Original post by Mazty)
    And what did I say before? I said it is regarded as a soft subject, whether it deserves that reputation is a different topic and something I have never talked about.
    The **** they came out with was studies which were proving common sense (you remember words related to one another rather than random words - no **** Sherlock) and other crap too inane to recall.
    I'm scared of it? Hardly. I find human psychology exceptionally interesting, but it's not quite engineering, so go take your argumentative juvenile attitude somewhere else.
    what an unnecessary reaction, I wasnt being rude nor presenting any attitude. I dont see Psychology as being all about common sense I have drawn many things from it that have changed my views on the world, even if the subject was frustrating at times.
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    (Original post by Mazty)
    The **** they came out with was studies which were proving common sense (you remember words related to one another rather than random words - no **** Sherlock) and other crap too inane to recall.
    1. I can guarantee that the conclusions made in that paper were no where near as simple as that. The simple fact is A-level Psychology represents the discipline in a terrible way. It needs to be revamped or scrapped.

    2. That finding may seem common sense, but it needs to be verified empirically as it plays an important role in forming the foundation of larger theories relating to lexical recalling. It would be improper to start based on what you assume to be true.
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    First of all, it's not considered a soft subject, it is considered a second-tier subject i.e. acceptable as a second A Level as long as you have one of the first-tier subjects as your first A Level. Even so, this actually only applies to the very best universities. Also, Psychology is almost essential to studying Psychology at University when it comes to the admissions process. I have never met a person apply for Psychology without doing it at A Level first. Just go ahead and pick it! Especially if you are considering studying it at Uni, because it is NOT considered a second-tier subject if you applying to study it as a degree.

    And, from studying it myself, there are a lot of biological aspects. I find it relatively easy and interesting, however, you have to be willing to work to learn it all as there is A LOT. It's probably my favourite subject even though I'm going to be studying Law at University. I would definitely recommend taking it - although I don't know if I like it so much because my psychology's teaching style is so fun.
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    (Original post by jimmyatemyworld)
    And, from studying it myself, there are a lot of biological aspects.
    People say this about A-level Psychology. Complete BS.
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    (Original post by Xhotas)
    You've got 3 "Hard" Subjects and Psychology. You'd be fine.

    But I recommend picking something else if you want to do psychology, no uni will accept you if you have an A Level in psychology.
    This was intended to be a joke, I didn't seriously mean no uni would accept you for it. But now I remember how things go with the likes of Oxbridge, Law A Level and that **** that I forgot when writing it.

    But I'm too manly to apologise for a joke. Grrrrrr.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    People say this about A-level Psychology. Complete BS.
    It's not. It depends what topics you do, but there is always a biological explanation. It can be as biological as you want it provided you get a question on the physiological aspects or evaluating an explanation of, for example, eating behaviour. Then you can go as biological as you want about brain structure, neurotransmitters.. Alternatively, if you're not a biologically inclined person you can put in as little biology as you want provided you don't get a physiological question. However, at A2, all the marks go on evaluation basically, so if you can't evaluate, don't do it. If find people who are more scientifically inclined struggle with evaluation because they just want to write the AO1 marks, but you will fail by doing that.
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    (Original post by jimmyatemyworld)
    Then you can go as biological as you want about brain structure, neurotransmitters.
    Like what?
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    YES...it is seen as a oft subject. better to do biology X
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    (Original post by adam_zed)
    what an unnecessary reaction, I wasnt being rude nor presenting any attitude. I dont see Psychology as being all about common sense I have drawn many things from it that have changed my views on the world, even if the subject was frustrating at times.
    Don't back tread - you said I was "scared of it as many people dislike to think that they are being "infiltrated" as to speak." So in future just keep the attitude to yourself or at the very least tone it down.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    1. I can guarantee that the conclusions made in that paper were no where near as simple as that. The simple fact is A-level Psychology represents the discipline in a terrible way. It needs to be revamped or scrapped.

    2. That finding may seem common sense, but it needs to be verified empirically as it plays an important role in forming the foundation of larger theories relating to lexical recalling. It would be improper to start based on what you assume to be true.
    1.Agreed
    2.Agreed, but still, what importance does knowledge about lexical recalling have?
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    (Original post by Mazty)
    1.Agreed
    2.Agreed, but still, what importance does knowledge about lexical recalling have?
    To develop cognitive models of speech production which can be fed into neuropsychological models which ultimately inform neurological practice, computational neuroscience and evolutionary neurobiology.
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      Depends what you want to do in life
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      (Original post by Mazty)
      Don't back tread - you said I was "scared of it as many people dislike to think that they are being "infiltrated" as to speak." So in future just keep the attitude to yourself or at the very least tone it down.
      lol that isnt "attitude"? if I pointed out that most people are scared of the dark, would you also accuse me of showing "attitude"? Dont make such a fuss out of nothing.
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      (Original post by adam_zed)
      lol that isnt "attitude"? if I pointed out that most people are scared of the dark, would you also accuse me of showing "attitude"? Dont make such a fuss out of nothing.
      Making accusations that implied I was lowering the integrity of something because I was 'scared' of it was pretty weak. Next time either be a man and admit the mistake or be a kid and try to worm yourself out of an awkward position - choice is entirely up to you :indiff:
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      (Original post by Mazty)
      Making accusations that implied I was lowering the integrity of something because I was 'scared' of it was pretty weak. Next time either be a man and admit the mistake or be a kid and try to worm yourself out of an awkward position - choice is entirely up to you :indiff:
      you whiney little girl, why are you carrying on? I think I have explained what I meant sufficiently. if you are in a confrontational mood fairplay, but I personally dont want to bare the brunt of it so go away.

      funny that you are taking the high ground considering you said you associate Psychology with thick kids.
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      My girlfriend is currently doing it at A2, and I can certainly say it is not a soft subject. Certainly no easier than the History A level I did.
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      Psychology A level is a hard one definetly not regarded as a soft subject. It seems to go well with the others you have picked.
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      (Original post by Jordyn)
      I am in the process of choosing my A Levels for next year and I really want to do psychology but I've heard that it's considered to be a 'soft' subject. Is it? My other subjects are History, Chemistry and Biology and I'm undecided what I want to do at Uni (most likely either Biology or Psychology).
      Yes, you would be better of with maths, physics or english. Don't forget you can look up the courses and uni's you are interested in and they will tell you the A levels required for the course as well as the recommended combinations.
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      (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
      Anyone who hadn't studied it at A-level would be massively behind the overwhelming majority that did.

      Not studying it, despite it not being a requirement, would leave you having to do serious catch-up in your first year.
      This. Having psych at A level greatly takes the pressure off in first year. Having bio and psych makes it an absolute breeze.
     
     
     
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