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Why not cut university places instead of raising fees? Watch

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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Not necessarily. There have been reports where university graduates (not necessarily those who did Media) do not even have the basic literacy and numeracy skills. Have a university degree does not necessarily make you anymore skilled - and judging from the course content of many Media degrees, I would be inclined to say that that is true.

    I have no sympathy for people want to do degrees like Media and Film and cannot afford to so (technically this is not even true - everyone can, get your facts right).



    Fair enough reducing Media places - so why isn't this happening?
    I didn't say 'it does' make them more skilled, but generally speaking you will be more skilled after doing a degree than before you went in to do it.
    Just thinking of areas that need to be increased.
    i) All Sciences
    ii) Heath - Medicine, Vet Science, Dentistry etc.
    iii) Certain Social Sciences - Economics, Law etc. not so much sociology.

    Universities can make money out of them?
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    (Original post by patientology)
    The state is not just investing in education to secure experts in the fields that strengthen the economy. The raising the general knowledge of the average citizen is the aim. Remember that economists were not the people that propelled humanities progress or the mentality of a nation.

    Cutting university places means: less people that can study. Raising fees means: more people can study, but only those who can afford it. I'd rather opt for the latter (for great Science!).

    Before dumbing a nation down I'd form a collected European army instead of a national one. I think education, health and basic infrastructure are the most important things to support by the government and any cuts in these areas are debatable.
    Sorry, what?
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      (Original post by patientology)
      The state is not just investing in education to secure experts in the fields that strengthen the economy. The raising the general knowledge of the average citizen is the aim. Remember that economists were not the people that propelled humanities progress or the mentality of a nation.

      Cutting university places means: less people that can study. Raising fees means: more people can study, but only those who can afford it. I'd rather opt for the latter (for great Science!).

      Before dumbing a nation down I'd form a collected European army instead of a national one. I think education, health and basic infrastructure are the most important things to support by the government and any cuts in these areas are debatable.
      You certainly do not need to go university to raise your "general knowledge".

      There is also the option of studying part-time through distance learning with the Open University.
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        (Original post by SPMS)
        I didn't say 'it does' make them more skilled, but generally speaking you will be more skilled after doing a degree than before you went in to do it.
        Just thinking of areas that need to be increased.
        i) All Sciences
        ii) Heath - Medicine, Vet Science, Dentistry etc.
        iii) Certain Social Sciences - Economics, Law etc. not so much sociology.

        Universities can make money out of them?
        Fair enough, I have no objections for places in those subjects to be raised.
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        Having a degree doesn't seem to set you apart any more. Or at least having a degree of worth.
        Evceryone seems to have one, and as pointed out above, some in things that really don't make sense to be doing as a degree, which instead should be on-the-job or vocational courses outside or only linked to university.
        Plenty of recent graduates have come out of their degrees (even academic "real" degrees) to find that there is no work. So about £20,000+ of debt and 3-4 years of their life ends them in a £6/hr retail or admin job.
        It seems to be experience that matters. A degree isn't the means to a career. It doesn't generally prepare you for the outside world of work.
        Even know, i am having to tailor the proposal for my MSc thesis to the area I plan to go into for work as that is the closest I will be getting to experience.
        University is pushed as what everyone should aim for... this shouldn't be the case in my opinion.
        I think the alternative to cutting university places or raising fees would be to make the degrees that exist ones that can only really be done that way, and making for more vocational courses done in a different way and accepted as 'equivalent qualifications'.
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        (Original post by chlobofro)
        If someone wants to do a degree for the sheer interest.. why shouldn't they?
        But if that is the case, why should the taxpayer fund the degree at all?

        EDIT: sorry, didn't see that someone else had already asked.

        Would you still pay for all the costs if you didn't get a degree out of it, just the knowledge?
       
       
       
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