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    Could someone fill me in on why there is so much to do on a PGCE? I know a few people doing it, and they are also finding it stressful. But I feel completely ignorant as to why is there so much to learn. What is there to learn? Presumably you're not just learning the subject you're teaching, because you already did that at school on top of several other subjects and that wasn't too bad. Keep going guys!
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    (Original post by glance)
    Could someone fill me in on why there is so much to do on a PGCE? I know a few people doing it, and they are also finding it stressful. But I feel completely ignorant as to why is there so much to learn. What is there to learn? Presumably you're not just learning the subject you're teaching, because you already did that at school on top of several other subjects and that wasn't too bad. Keep going guys!
    What pgce are you applying for? There is less university stuff for secondary. For primary I had seminars on different subjects - it was a mix of subject knowledge (some of the subjects you wouldn't have done since you were 14) and pedagagy (how to teach). You would come up with mini lesson plans in groups and things. There was also educational studies - how children learn, general pedagogy, how to plan a lesson, classroom organisation, assessment, behaviour management, government documentation and the law stuff related to teaching (eg child protection)
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Random...pos rep given to balance it out

    You "rated left handed people?" haha...gotta check that post out!
    Why thankyou
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    (Original post by xKTx)
    There is less university stuff for secondary.
    not true!!
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    (Original post by caroline_p3)
    not true!!
    My housemate who did a secondary PGCE was in school the majority of time, compared to me who had approx a 50/50 split of university/school time. There was less in the way of subject knowledge stuff for him to do, as he was already knowledgeable in his subject (D&T). That wasn't me saying that a secondary one is any easier, just that he had less time in university than me (a few weeks at the beginning, then half terms, along with the odd days)
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    There is definately less University time for secondary people aswell at my Uni I've been in Uni all this term bar three weeks when I was in school whereas she's been in school practically 80% of the time! So yeah I think our Primary is 50/50 and secondary is about 70/30
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    What I discovered for lesson planning is:

    know your objectives first, ie what you want your class to have achieved at the end of the lesson and word backwards from there..it helped me

    all the best for a rewarding career..
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    (Original post by glance)
    Could someone fill me in on why there is so much to do on a PGCE? I know a few people doing it, and they are also finding it stressful. But I feel completely ignorant as to why is there so much to learn. What is there to learn? Presumably you're not just learning the subject you're teaching, because you already did that at school on top of several other subjects and that wasn't too bad. Keep going guys!
    It really really depends on what subject/ level you do. I'm doing Secondary English and the things I find are the most laborious are planning the actual lessons. With English you not only have the national curriculum, but the secondary English framework - all lessons have to correspond to various strands depending on the year group and the area of focus eg speaking and listening, reading or writing. As i'm so knew to this it takes a long time to work out what to focus on. Also the lesson objective tends to take a while for me to word properly. It has to convey the learning objective, which isn't always as straightforward as you initially think (again linking back to the STRANDS :eek:) lol!

    Then once you have planned your lesson (on the stupidly long and detailed Uni template) I have to create the resources for the lesson. So this may be as simple as googling something, or as time consuming as making a worksheet, game, activity / all three and more!

    This probably sounds easy for some people, but it is time consuming! Especially when you have 12 hours teaching a week (going up to 20hrs next placement)

    GCSE is slightly different and requires more in depth planning as it actually matters that the pupils learn something! Then there are the assignment lessons, which took me so long to plan prepare and mark that i can't even be bothered to talk about them!!

    Oh yeah then there's the long assignments you do at the same time. i have 3 x 6000 word essays to write, 2 of them to Masters standard and thus requiring lots of critical analysis. Again i'm sure some people will find this pretty easy, but everyone on my particular course has found it demanding and tiring. Having said that the R.E students have a lot less 'complaints' and find the lesson planning easier as their subject is a lot more discussion based and less confined to annoying frameworks and Government models!
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    (Original post by Kidders)
    It really really depends on what subject/ level you do. I'm doing Secondary English and the things I find are the most laborious are planning the actual lessons. With English you not only have the national curriculum, but the secondary English framework - all lessons have to correspond to various strands depending on the year group and the area of focus eg speaking and listening, reading or writing. As i'm so knew to this it takes a long time to work out what to focus on. Also the lesson objective tends to take a while for me to word properly. It has to convey the learning objective, which isn't always as straightforward as you initially think (again linking back to the STRANDS :eek:) lol!

    Then once you have planned your lesson (on the stupidly long and detailed Uni template) I have to create the resources for the lesson. So this may be as simple as googling something, or as time consuming as making a worksheet, game, activity / all three and more!

    This probably sounds easy for some people, but it is time consuming! Especially when you have 12 hours teaching a week (going up to 20hrs next placement)

    GCSE is slightly different and requires more in depth planning as it actually matters that the pupils learn something! Then there are the assignment lessons, which took me so long to plan prepare and mark that i can't even be bothered to talk about them!!

    Oh yeah then there's the long assignments you do at the same time. i have 3 x 6000 word essays to write, 2 of them to Masters standard and thus requiring lots of critical analysis. Again i'm sure some people will find this pretty easy, but everyone on my particular course has found it demanding and tiring. Having said that the R.E students have a lot less 'complaints' and find the lesson planning easier as their subject is a lot more discussion based and less confined to annoying frameworks and Government models!
    Yes, it's tough. I honestly think the PGCE needs to be restructured a bit. To some degree I do think the initial teacher training should be more practice focused. I love conducting research, but student teachers should be more focussed on understanding how to plan and teach. Whilst writing up these long detailed lesson plans can be annoying, it really forces you to focus on what the students are learning. The course is more than enough without the 2 mandatory assignments that require literature reviews and in-class research. Your planning and reflection is more important. You will be able to track your understanding of your subject and teaching your subject through that alone.

    In addition to adjusting to a new career,with a huge learning curve, you are teaching someone else's class, teaching at 2 different schools and have to be careful how you approach certain subjects. I find it tiresome having to plan lessons with another teacher, as you don't always see you class every time they have your subject (more so at your first placement - we started 3 days/week and moved to 4 days/week. I find this stressful. Also, if you have any concerns about the classroom teacher, you have to approach it lightly with your mentor (assuming you have a good one, or one at all). I have a great one, which helps immensely, but it only lightens the stress a little.

    Overall, I think it's the adjustment, the enormous amount of knowledge you must gain on the course, and approaching things lightly that tire people out. It's exhausting to try and please yourself and everyone around you. Plus, you realise that you are responsible for the learning for all those kids (you think you know this going in, but you really don't). If you are teaching English, loads of marking to do on top of it all!

    After saying all of that, I do enjoy teaching. My favourite part of the course is being in the classroom with my students. I love it! However, when I get home, I dread all the other work and can't wait to get to bed. I'm enjoying my holiday, planning ahead and getting some uni work done, but mostly just relaxing.
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    Yes, it's tough. I honestly think the PGCE needs to be restructured a bit. To some degree I do think the initial teacher training should be more practice focused. I love conducting research, but student teachers should be more focussed on understanding how to plan and teach. Whilst writing up these long detailed lesson plans can be annoying, it really forces you to focus on what the students are learning. The course is more than enough without the 2 mandatory assignments that require literature reviews and in-class research. Your planning and reflection is more important. You will be able to track your understanding of your subject and teaching your subject through that alone.
    I disagree - if people have a problem with essays, etc. then don't do a PGCE, go do the GTP, TeachFirst, PGDE or one of those. I have little knowledge of any of them but I'm quite sure that you will find a lot less academic pressure from things like essays, reseach papers, reading, etc. on those courses.

    A PGCE, many of which give you Masters credits, are designed to push you and really make you think about teaching and also your discipline. Anyone can be taught to do a lesson plan - I completely agree they are incredibly time consuming (I should be doing it now) but relatively straight forwards once you've done them a few times.

    Whereas for those people who are aiming to be Department Heads and beyond really need to be thinking about the theory behind their subjects - why do the kids learn my subject? Where has it come from and where is it going? Then other issues within school - SEN, inclusion, bullying, assessment, welfare, uniform, timings, discipline, etc etc. all things that yes teachers know about but you find they are actually really interested in what you are writing essays on because they simply don't have the time to look into that anymore.

    As students they really do pile the pressure on, I agree, but it's for our own good - this is really the only time that we're going to be pushed to research topics that are going to form the foundations of us as teachers. Enjoy the challenge

    PS. To the person who said in Primary you do more in Uni than Secondary - I agree with you However, I really WISH I did more in Uni then in School haha, school's a killer!!
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Stuff on essays....

    (Original post by Kidders)
    And more stuffs
    Do these essays need to be done for all subjects? I'm looking at Secondary Maths so haven't written an essay for years, let alone how long it'll be when I eventually graduate.!
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    One of the many reasons i feel sorry for the trainees at my school
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    (Original post by lilangel890)
    Do these essays need to be done for all subjects? I'm looking at Secondary Maths so haven't written an essay for years, let alone how long it'll be when I eventually graduate.!
    Yes I'm afraid they are - alongside your usual teaching you will be required to write a few essays.

    Most likely one or two throughout the year on your specific subject, such as how do you engage the least interested pupils in maths or something like that.

    Also you'll do what at Bristol is called EPS (Educational and Professional Studies) which is about learning how to be a teacher, not subject specific. You'll have to do 2 maybe 3 essays throughout the year on teaching - topics could include things such as SEN (Special Educational Needs), bullying, welfare, out-of-school activities, sports clubs, uniforms, active engagement, assessment etc etc etc!!

    So yeah, if you do a PGCE expect to have to do some essays. They should provide you with lectures/seminars to bring everyone up to a similar standard for knowing how to do essays. They did that with us, very annoying for those of us who are used to doing essays!! But apparently helpful for the likes of mathematicians who aren't used to writing social-science style essays

    I wouldn't worry about it too much! Lots of people not used to doing essays but they get by
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    (Original post by xKTx)
    My housemate who did a secondary PGCE was in school the majority of time, compared to me who had approx a 50/50 split of university/school time. There was less in the way of subject knowledge stuff for him to do, as he was already knowledgeable in his subject (D&T). That wasn't me saying that a secondary one is any easier, just that he had less time in university than me (a few weeks at the beginning, then half terms, along with the odd days)

    Being at uni was the easiest part for me, it is being at school and actually teaching which is why the PGCE is so stressful in my eyes. Secondary still have all the same amount of essays/reflections/plans etc. More lesson plans if they are in School more of the time. I think being in a school is where you learn most and develop a teacher, the theory side is just that THEORY until you actually practice it!
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    I wasn't saying that the uni time was any harder - far from it! The question was just on what was done for the uni part of it. I know school is the busiest/most demanding etc time of a pgce
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    Even though I'm incredibly busy when I'm at school, I find it easier to cope with than when I'm in lectures all week, because I really feel like there's a specific purpose to all of the hours that I'm putting in.
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    My friend is doing secondary maths, i'm doing primary, she seems a lot busier than me. I think the problem is that she has essays due all the time and has to write them while she's on placement, whereas my primary course is carefully structured to make sure all our essays are due while we're actually in uni, so on placement we just have to focus on being on placement. I'm at Oxford Brookes and would recommend it to anyone, they really try their hardest to make sure people are not stressed and there's always someone to talk to if it gets too much!
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    I disagree - if people have a problem with essays, etc. then don't do a PGCE, go do the GTP, TeachFirst, PGDE or one of those. I have little knowledge of any of them but I'm quite sure that you will find a lot less academic pressure from things like essays, reseach papers, reading, etc. on those courses.

    A PGCE, many of which give you Masters credits, are designed to push you and really make you think about teaching and also your discipline. Anyone can be taught to do a lesson plan - I completely agree they are incredibly time consuming (I should be doing it now) but relatively straight forwards once you've done them a few times.
    Just wanted to let people know that on TeachFirst you have 4 written assignments to complete over the first training year. They are also Masters accredited.
    They are always due in at the ends of holiday, never in term time so you have some non-school time to work on them.
    Personally I hated doing them, as I felt I never had enough time to do them "properly", like I had done at uni. I was always just trying to pass and get rid of them as quickly as possible.
    I really don't envy people training...if someone told me I had to go back and redo my training year I think I'd cry! It's worth it in the end though when you get your own classes and can start to grow in confidence and really develop your own style rather than trying to please your observers all the time!
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Yes I'm afraid they are - alongside your usual teaching you will be required to write a few essays.

    Most likely one or two throughout the year on your specific subject, such as how do you engage the least interested pupils in maths or something like that.

    Also you'll do what at Bristol is called EPS (Educational and Professional Studies) which is about learning how to be a teacher, not subject specific. You'll have to do 2 maybe 3 essays throughout the year on teaching - topics could include things such as SEN (Special Educational Needs), bullying, welfare, out-of-school activities, sports clubs, uniforms, active engagement, assessment etc etc etc!!

    So yeah, if you do a PGCE expect to have to do some essays. They should provide you with lectures/seminars to bring everyone up to a similar standard for knowing how to do essays. They did that with us, very annoying for those of us who are used to doing essays!! But apparently helpful for the likes of mathematicians who aren't used to writing social-science style essays

    I wouldn't worry about it too much! Lots of people not used to doing essays but they get by
    Sure I replied to this. Hmm I'm not sure I like the idea of that tbh, though if every uni has those classes you talk about maybe it wouldn't be too hard. Oh well it's a long way away Thanks
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    (Original post by Becca)
    Just wanted to let people know that on TeachFirst you have 4 written assignments to complete over the first training year. They are also Masters accredited.
    They are always due in at the ends of holiday, never in term time so you have some non-school time to work on them.
    Personally I hated doing them, as I felt I never had enough time to do them "properly", like I had done at uni. I was always just trying to pass and get rid of them as quickly as possible.
    I really don't envy people training...if someone told me I had to go back and redo my training year I think I'd cry! It's worth it in the end though when you get your own classes and can start to grow in confidence and really develop your own style rather than trying to please your observers all the time!
    Was waiting for you to turn up and put me right get back to Norway you hehe

    Pos rep given, why not? Happy New Year!!
 
 
 
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