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    Dissection itself is tedious. Prosection, on the other hand, is useful.
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    I had the chance to dissect the brain and it was very uneventful. I was expecting it to be pink and squishy like the marshmallow sweets that are shaped like brains. My childhood illusions = shattered. :moon:
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    (Original post by Organ)
    Nice. I think at HYMS it's an SSC, so it isn't compulsory - it just can be done if the student wants to.
    It's worth mentioning that SSCs like this are often very competitive, so it's not a case that every student that wants to dissect can.
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    BSMS went there to an open day with my bf, and i remember when he came out the dissection room he told me he just saw 15 dead bodies lol i would never be able to do med hahah
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    (Original post by I-love-life)
    BSMS went there to an open day with my bf, and i remember when he came out the dissection room he told me he just saw 15 dead bodies lol i would never be able to do med hahah
    They did this at Sheffield...I don't think it is very ethical to show non medics cadavers as it isn't really what the donors signed up for when they signed for 'medical education'.
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    (Original post by gm15)
    I would of thought they all would
    Why did somebody neg me for this?
    All i said was that (not being a med student or applicant) that i thought all med schools would do dissection. I was wrong but why does that dserve neg?

    OK somebody neg this too. Why?
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    They did this at Sheffield...I don't think it is very ethical to show non medics cadavers as it isn't really what the donors signed up for when they signed for 'medical education'.
    I did biomedical science at Sheffield Uni. We had 3 modules of dissection, everyone (well probably) thought it was useful for their education. 'medical education' doesn't mean just for medics, it's open to the field.
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    (Original post by page_down)
    I did biomedical science at Sheffield Uni. We had 3 modules of dissection, everyone (well probably) thought it was useful for their education. 'medical education' doesn't mean just for medics, it's open to the field.
    but people at an open day who couldn't possibly learn anything meaningful from it other than "look at us, we do dissection/prosection"?
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    They did this at Sheffield...I don't think it is very ethical to show non medics cadavers as it isn't really what the donors signed up for when they signed for 'medical education'.
    I assume by non-medics you are just generally referring to people there for non-academic purposes, e.g. open day kids.

    As a psych student, attending neuroanatomy dissections has been very helpful. Despite the fact that we are non-medics, we were obviously nothing but respectful and very appreciative of the donors and their families.
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    but people at an open day who couldn't possibly learn anything meaningful from it other than "look at us, we do dissection/prosection"?
    Oh yeah, in that case it's different. Maybe the uni want to show people how special they are? But I don;t see why they tell them that in a presentation.
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    I used the term "non-medic" in the context of it being a medical open day. It's fine to use cadavers for education (as their are many other fields that do dissection and use prosections) but not to "show off" dissection as part of open days or to sell the course.
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    First year med students at Cardiff generally spend 2 days a week in the DR, with an anatomy exam in late Feb/early March. Most of the dissection is a waste of time. I certainly learned more from the specimens they had in the DR.
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    I am just wondering a few things about prosection. I know what it is, etc. but just wondering a few technicalities.

    For the most part, are you able to get hands-on with the prosection? As in, practically the only difference between prosection and dissection would be the fact you dissect yourself, while in prosection somebody does it for you (either then and there, or earlier) and you just get the body part?

    I've seen a few things (cuts of brains preserved in perspex) that have been described as 'prosection'. They aren't just all like this, are they?

    I know it would probably depend on medical school but I am just interested in general info.
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    'Prosection' is anything that's done by an anatomist to a specimen to teach students. So the anatomist could do a dissection that the students observe, or it could be smaller specimens to show off a particular structure. Most 'prosections' will be parts of the body that have been pre-dissected. The ones that are stored in preservatives in perspex are still prosections - they're just not as useful as the specimens that you can handle.
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    (Original post by gm15)
    Why did somebody neg me for this?
    All i said was that (not being a med student or applicant) that i thought all med schools would do dissection. I was wrong but why does that dserve neg?

    OK somebody neg this too. Why?

    Because (this is going to sound rude but I'm tired and am probably being a bit blunt) nobody actually wants to know "what you think" as they asked for a factual answer. And if you don't know/aren't sure for a factual question, it's really not worth you posting as it contributes nothing to the thread.
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    Anyone know if SGUL use it? Can't find anything about it.
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    (Original post by winter_mute)
    Anyone know if SGUL use it? Can't find anything about it.
    SGUL do dissections if that's what you're asking?
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    (Original post by gm15)
    Why did somebody neg me for this?
    All i said was that (not being a med student or applicant) that i thought all med schools would do dissection. I was wrong but why does that dserve neg?

    OK somebody neg this too. Why?
    Because this is a thread looking for a specific answer, not the ponderings of someone who is completely ignorant on the subject.

    You clog up the thread and hide decent answers with guesses. At best they are an annoyance, at worst they are misleading.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I am just wondering a few things about prosection. I know what it is, etc. but just wondering a few technicalities.

    For the most part, are you able to get hands-on with the prosection? As in, practically the only difference between prosection and dissection would be the fact you dissect yourself, while in prosection somebody does it for you (either then and there, or earlier) and you just get the body part?

    I've seen a few things (cuts of brains preserved in perspex) that have been described as 'prosection'. They aren't just all like this, are they?

    I know it would probably depend on medical school but I am just interested in general info.
    In blue: yes, which is why it's so much better. The only people, really, who value dissection here at Keele are those wanting to be surgeons. Seem to think it gives a valuable insight into what surgery's like...

    Our prosections aren't preserved in perspex. They're exactly the same 'format' as all the other cadavers, just an anatomist - rather than an amateur student - has carefully and proficiently dissected - rather than hacked* - the important structures out.

    *Today in dissection, the people working on the anterior thigh... it looked like a blind person with a cheese grater had tried to expose the muscles. Just crap. Whereas the prosection was beautifully showing all the muscles.
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    Peninsula is the only medical school in the country which does not do dissection or prosection. Their theory is that if you are looking at dead flesh you have done something wrong as dead flesh looks very different to living tissues. We learn all our anatomy by drawing it and feeling the landmarks on each other and life models, using plastic models, looking at online resources like Aclands Dissection videos and Anatomy TV. They say that if a view of something doesn't exist that you want they will make it for you. Not only that, but you can prob download it to your iphones as well. They are quite techy, our lot. Personally, I love doing it this way because I can look at it in lots of different ways as many times as I like, and I can go through the anatomy dissection videos which are helpfully broken down into 5 minute chunks on specific parts with helpful commentary from many different angles, whenever I like as many times as I like. You can only cut something once, and I'm assuming you can only see the prosections once? If we really want to do some cutting ourselves, there's tales of a surgeon in Truro that will do small group sessions on demand.
 
 
 
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