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"Intent on violence"? Watch

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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    I thought these protests were serious- then I saw an LSE student whine to a cameraman that "he hadn't been allowed to go to the toilet or eat for 6 hours".
    It's a violation of basic human rights to obstruct one's right to leave a designated area at any point to utilise the bathroom or buy food. He had every right to whine that the police weren't allowing people right of way.
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    Accusing the British Police of being 'brutal' or 'heavy handed'!

    If this was in any other country you'd have been hit with water cannons, tear gas and maybe even rubber bullets. In some countries live bullets.

    Yet having to stand around needing a piss for a few hours seems to have sucked the fight right out of you all.. so much for fighting spirit. Some revolution to be halted by the threat of some ****ty skidmarks.
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    (Original post by AnarchistNutter)
    It's a violation of basic human rights to obstruct one's right to leave a designated area at any point to utilise the bathroom or buy food. He had every right to whine that the police weren't allowing people right of way.
    Yes, he can whine, but he can't then go and propose that this student "movement" is akin to anything more than a bunch of soft fleshed peter pans who don't want to grow up congregating in a corner and being confused and frightened by the real world, the prospects of a job and not living off the sweat of others.

    I got mugged today, but it was ok, I pulled out my human rights in time.
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    Oh, Please! I've had enough of hearing this pathetic excuse! As far as I'm concerned a third of the protesters came to the rally with the intent to cause violence and damages. I'm sorry to say this, but my fellow students have let me down I thought we were the intelligent ones?
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    (Original post by channy)
    The marches were completely peaceful.

    Sure, there are extremists who obviously came on intent of violence, but you shouldn't generalise all students because of them. I wonder why they were angry enough to throw them? Could it be kettling? Cavalry charges, á la Peterloo Massacre? People tend to generalise and blow everything (pardon the pun) out of proportion.

    For Churchill, not many excuses. Royal Family? This is the 21st Century.
    It's not a case of why they threw them it's a case of them being brought along in the first place.

    How can you even suggest that the marches were peaceful?

    The cavalry charges were brought upon by the students starting to riot; the police used soft handed tactics in the first march and the streets were absolute chaos. Since then, the police have been rightfully more firm in controlling the protest.

    And I agree with your last sentiment, things have been blown out of proportion, the 'extreme police brutality' was actually just a standard riot control.
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    It's not a case of why they threw them it's a case of them being brought along in the first place.

    How can you even suggest that the marches were peaceful?

    The cavalry charges were brought upon by the students starting to riot; the police used soft handed tactics in the first march and the streets were absolute chaos. Since then, the police have been rightfully more firm in controlling the protest.

    And I agree with your last sentiment, things have been blown out of proportion, the 'extreme police brutality' was actually just a standard riot control.
    The marches were peaceful. I was there. All accounts of the actual marching have been highly positive - chanting, banner a waving and good spirited.

    The same could be said of the police men; why did they bring their batons?

    You can hardly call that a riot. That is tame compared what our European neighbours do. The cavalry charges are reckless. It's insane. I'm suprised no one got killed, to be frank. It's one thing throwing objects at police-men that have full riot gear on (and don't believe the police when they say how many of them were injured; they tend to count anything and everything), and it's another to charge into a tightly packed crowd on horseback. Jesus christ. I'm not even suprised a police-man fell off and got trampled by his own horse. It's insane. The cavalry charge wasn't invented to "control" a crowd by the way, far from it.
    I'm not against using horses to "contain" a crowd (as in a line of horses), but charging into one? At that speed? Into that dense a crowd? Come off it ffs (no pun intended).

    If you actually saw the crowd of people that they charged into, they were merely trying to get out. It's as simple as that. And most of them were children.

    Have a read of my thread http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=28856156.

    Anyway, it's nice to see policing tactics have changed much from early 19th century, eh?
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    (Original post by ArcaneAnna)
    Completely agree.

    During Millbank, my mate got arrested and they have confiscated his phone and camera because he had picture and video evidence of how the police treat protesters. He had to wait for a good while before they gave him his camera back, and all the footage has been deleted. And he still hasn't been given his phone back.

    We have a few videos off peoples phones, and it's absolutley disgusting how you're treated by the police.
    What was he arrested for? Surelythey aren't allowed to delete stuff off of his camera, he should have complained.
    The problem is the media can spin these stories anyway they want, but the truth is, unless you were there, you really have no idea what it was like.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    why the **** were you there, then?





    I thought these protests were serious- then I saw an LSE student whine to a cameraman that "he hadn't been allowed to go to the toilet or eat for 6 hours".

    Absolute ****ing joke, your eating out of the governments hand and ****ting on their doorstep.

    You are right, you're all kids
    I was there cos I didn't want that vote to pass. It's not going to increase social mobility, it is going to put off people from going to uni and the increased fees are not going to cover the removal of government grants.

    And how does a guy saying that the police have not allowed him to take a dump make everyone who went children? These protests are serious, if they weren't people wouldn't be angry enough for violence however much they were provoked by agitators and the police.
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    (Original post by hamijack)
    I was there cos I didn't want that vote to pass. It's not going to increase social mobility, it is going to put off people from going to uni and the increased fees are not going to cover the removal of government grants.

    And how does a guy saying that the police have not allowed him to take a dump make everyone who went children? These protests are serious, if they weren't people wouldn't be angry enough for violence however much they were provoked by agitators and the police.
    The only reason why it would put people of is students spreading this negative propaganda that says the fee rises have adverse affects on the poor. These protests were serious? yet you complain about being kettled? Would you have committed suicide if CS gas was fired? You went, you were chaperoned, don't complain.
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    (Original post by channy)
    The marches were peaceful. I was there. All accounts of the actual marching have been highly positive - chanting, banner a waving and good spirited.

    The same could be said of the police men; why did they bring their batons?

    You can hardly call that a riot. That is tame compared what our European neighbours do. The cavalry charges are reckless. It's insane. I'm suprised no one got killed, to be frank. It's one thing throwing objects at police-men that have full riot gear on (and don't believe the police when they say how many of them were injured; they tend to count anything and everything), and it's another to charge into a tightly packed crowd on horseback. Jesus christ. I'm not even suprised a police-man fell off and got trampled by his own horse. It's insane. The cavalry charge wasn't invented to "control" a crowd by the way, far from it.
    I'm not against using horses to "contain" a crowd (as in a line of horses), but charging into one? At that speed? Into that dense a crowd? Come off it ffs (no pun intended).

    If you actually saw the crowd of people that they charged into, they were merely trying to get out. It's as simple as that. And most of them were children.

    Have a read of my thread http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=28856156.

    Anyway, it's nice to see policing tactics have changed much from early 19th century, eh?
    why did the Police bring batons? Are you being serious? Every single officer in the country has a baton, it's part of their uniform for christ sake.

    The horses seemed to be quite effective, the students weren't moving like the police asked, they send the horses in and everybody dispersed, no-one was injured, no problems.

    And your comment on Europe is very much that, the rioting we saw was nothing compared to Europe but this so called 'heavy-handed policing' was also nothing compared to Europe. No water cannons, no rubber bullets, no tear gas.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    The only reason why it would put people of is students spreading this negative propaganda that says the fee rises have adverse affects on the poor. These protests were serious? yet you complain about being kettled? Would you have committed suicide if CS gas was fired? You went, you were chaperoned, don't complain.
    Were you there? Have you been kettled? Its not tea and ****ing biscuits.

    I know the UK has relativly leniant crowd control methods compared to some other countries and if they did use CS gas on us I would camoaign to get the law changed as it's not only dangerous to us, but dngerous to the innocent bystanders who many on this thread seem so concerned about.

    And the fee rise will put people off because many peoplw will not want to put themselves in that ammount of debt that early in their life with no stable source of income.
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    (Original post by hamijack)
    And the fee rise will put people off because many peoplw will not want to put themselves in that ammount of debt that early in their life with no stable source of income.
    Then they should research the repayment system better and realise it's not that "real" debt, by any stretch of the imagination.

    Other than this, I have no comment on the protests as I don't know the fully story, just wanted to point out that the fees themselves won't put people off, their ignorance will.
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    why did the Police bring batons? Are you being serious? Every single officer in the country has a baton, it's part of their uniform for christ sake.

    The horses seemed to be quite effective, the students weren't moving like the police asked, they send the horses in and everybody dispersed, no-one was injured, no problems.

    And your comment on Europe is very much that, the rioting we saw was nothing compared to Europe but this so called 'heavy-handed policing' was also nothing compared to Europe. No water cannons, no rubber bullets, no tear gas.
    Double standards.

    Are you serious? You don't even know what you're talking about, judging from that comment you made. Christ, reading that bold part aloud makes me laugh.

    The police react to heavier rioting by using those methods. Cause and effect.

    I'm off for some ale. Tara.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Then they should research the repayment system better and realise it's not that "real" debt, by any stretch of the imagination.

    Other than this, I have no comment on the protests as I don't know the fully story, just wanted to point out that the fees themselves won't put people off, their ignorance will.
    Debt=the state of owing something (especially money)
    The students will owe money that they have to pay back. Under the definition above, how is that not real debt?

    On the brightside at least you acknowledge that you don't know the whole story about the protests and so aren't going to comment on them.
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    (Original post by hamijack)
    The students will owe money that they have to pay back. Under the definition above, how is that not real debt?
    For a start, they don't have to pay it back. Unlike real debt which you either pay, regardless of your income, or you default, this "debt" you only start paying back 9% of any money in your salary over 21k and if you haven't paid it back after 30 years, your debt is written off. Furthermore, it doesn't affect your credit rating. How can anyone class that as "real" debt and consider avoiding university because of it? 9% of earnings over 21k?! That's ****ing nothing. I'm under the old system and it was **** all when they were taking it out of my 15k salary.
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    (Original post by channy)
    Double standards.

    Are you serious? You don't even know what you're talking about, judging from that comment you made. Christ, reading that bold part aloud makes me laugh.

    The police react to heavier rioting by using those methods. Cause and effect.

    I'm off for some ale. Tara.
    Police wanted to disperse an unruly and unco-operative crowd, police send in horses, crowd disperses, police restore lines. Any questions?
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Police wanted to disperse an unruly and unco-operative crowd, police send in horses, crowd disperses, police restore lines. Any questions?
    christ, a quick browse through this forum shows how little some people know.

    you're from the south, suprise bloody suprise.
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    (Original post by Lewroll)
    What was he arrested for? Surelythey aren't allowed to delete stuff off of his camera, he should have complained.
    The problem is the media can spin these stories anyway day want, but the truth is, unless you were there, you really have no idea what it was like.
    exactly. that cock523 has absolutely no idea.
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    (Original post by Steevee)
    Yes, yes I do.

    In that situation, you know what you're getting into by joining those protests.
    This is complete garbage.

    You might as well take the right to protest away from people if you argue that way.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    I got mugged today, but it was ok, I pulled out my human rights in time.
    Oh the irony of this.

    (Original post by Rooster523)
    The horses seemed to be quite effective, the students weren't moving like the police asked, they send the horses in and everybody dispersed, no-one was injured, no problems.
    A policeman (or woman I can't recall) was injured falling off his horse.
 
 
 
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