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lawyers launch legal challenge to kettling Watch

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    What vested interests do those who attended the event have in lying about what happened?

    What vested interests do the gov't have in lying about what happened?
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    (Original post by Aj12)

    I've been around horses since I was 5 I know exactly what is like to have a horse running at you. I also know as anyone should that if you start trying to hit a horse or any animal with a stick its going to make the situation worse.

    There was no need for the violent reaction from the protesters.
    Same I am used to horses so was not worried by the horses, but I could see what everyone else around me were terrified and people did get trampled by them.

    I agree that violence is wrong, but these people were scared and angry at being 'attacked'
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    18 is old enough to know better.

    I've been around horses since I was 5 I know exactly what is like to have a horse running at you. I also know as anyone should that if you start trying to hit a horse or any animal with a stick its going to make the situation worse.

    There was no need for the violent reaction from the protesters.
    Good for you, I like horses too, but I can't afford lessons etc. Same with most people there, they have no experiences with horses (or any animals of that size). Of course they are going to panic and lash out.

    I didn't realise they were quite so tall, esp with an officer (sorry, animal) riding it.

    They shouldn't have brought them in the first place.

    TTYL x
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    (Original post by channy)
    Good for you, I like horses too, but I can't afford lessons etc. Same with most people there, they have no experiences with horses (or any animals of that size). Of course they are going to panic and lash out.

    I didn't realise they were quite so tall, esp with an officer (sorry, animal) riding it.

    They shouldn't have brought them in the first place.

    TTYL x
    As I pointed out before. The police had to reform the line or simply allow the protesters to break through and go on rampage.

    The choice would have been let them through, do a baton charge or use horses.

    Horses would be the best option with minimal threat to the officers or the protesters
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    (Original post by Prince Rupert)
    'Kettling' is done to contain a protest that has already gone off its planned route
    Sadly you are wrong. Not so much last week, but the protest before that the police went out to Kettle the protest before it had even started. Thats why the protestors fled and ended up in a cat and mouse game around central london.

    (Original post by The West Wing)
    This has been done (identical facts) before in a case called Austin v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2009] UKHL 5; [2009] 2 WLR 372 - the House of Lords have decided that kettling does not breach the European Convention of Human Rights

    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5607670.ece <- short summary
    As far as I am aware, that only is relevant when Kettling is used as a reaction. Maybe not this week, but the week before Kettling was used before the protest even started.

    (Original post by Aj12)
    The march was planned.

    It was not allowed to go parliament square.

    Protesters went to parliament square

    Small groups of protesters were allowed to leave. In this case Im far more inclined to believe the government and police than a few protesters, when it comes to this
    It was allowed to go to parliament square. It was on the route. Except the plan was to pass it, not to stay there. But they couldn't stick to the plan because the police kettled them.

    And as far as I am aware, people were not allowed to leave unless you were very young.

    (Original post by callum9999)
    Where did 9 hours come from? I don't believe people were kettled with no access to food or water for 9 hours.

    Even so, yes a sandwich would last anyone 9 hours. You'd be hungry but it's not going to do you any harm...
    I don't know if was quite 9 hours, but it was a very long time that people were kept without food or water or toilets. From mid afternoon till nearly midnight.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    As I pointed out before. The police had to reform the line or simply allow the protesters to break through and go on rampage.

    The choice would have been let them through, do a baton charge or use horses.

    Horses would be the best option with minimal threat to the officers or the protesters
    Sorry, just had to reply to this before I go eat.

    You show your ignorance yet again. When the cavalry charged, there was no pushing or "violence". The police line was fine, no bulging middle. When they charged, the police line parted like the Red Sea to let them through, into the densely packed crowd. I saw it, we all saw it, so I'm not surprised some people were angry.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    18 is old enough to know better.

    I've been around horses since I was 5 I know exactly what is like to have a horse running at you. I also know as anyone should that if you start trying to hit a horse or any animal with a stick its going to make the situation worse.

    There was no need for the violent reaction from the protesters.
    The protesters were told they could leave parliament square via the back (watch the bbc news coverage), once they got there they found they had been kettled and weren't aloud to leave, they started trying to break the line at one point being successful but then were charged with horses, only then did they start throwing sh*t like maniacs.

    Try and watch the coverage objectively its harldy as one-sided as you seem to think.
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    (Original post by channy)
    Good for you, I like horses too, but I can't afford lessons etc. Same with most people there, they have no experiences with horses (or any animals of that size). Of course they are going to panic and lash out.

    I didn't realise they were quite so tall, esp with an officer (sorry, animal) riding it.

    They shouldn't have brought them in the first place.

    TTYL x
    Keep the horses in their stables!
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    (Original post by channy)
    Sorry, just had to reply to this before I go eat.

    You show your ignorance yet again. When the cavalry charged, there was no pushing or "violence". The police line was fine, no bulging middle. When they charged, the police line parted like the Red Sea to let them through, into the densely packed crowd. I saw it, we all saw it, so I'm not surprised some people were angry.
    I saw this too and as far as I could tell, it appeared to be an unprovoked charge on horseback into the crowd. The police line was not successfully broken. The police parted to allow the horses to charge at the crowd
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    (Original post by channy)
    Sorry, just had to reply to this before I go eat.

    You show your ignorance yet again. When the cavalry charged, there was no pushing or "violence". The police line was fine, no bulging middle. When they charged, the police line parted like the Red Sea to let them through, into the densely packed crowd. I saw it, we all saw it, so I'm not surprised some people were angry.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axWyu1t4rkE

    You can see protesters scuffling with police. They all run like hell to get back, it allows the police to reform a stronger line.
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    You whites are so weak!!! Why let terrorists onto the streets in the first place?!!

    And once on the streets, causing havoc, you let them carry on!!

    You should be strong, and beat them like the animals they are. Then challange anyone to question you again.

    See, you whites have so much to learn from the strength of Africa!
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)


    As far as I am aware, that only is relevant when Kettling is used as a reaction. Maybe not this week, but the week before Kettling was used before the protest even started.
    The story in Austin is very similar - they kettled them as a pre-emptive move because they expected them to become violent.
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    (Original post by President Mugabe)
    You whites are so weak!!! Why let terrorists onto the streets in the first place?!!

    And once on the streets, causing havoc, you let them carry on!!

    You should be strong, and beat them like the animals they are. Then challange anyone to question you again.

    See, you whites have so much to learn from the strength of Africa!
    I'll admit it made me laugh, not sure if it's okay but it made me laugh
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    (Original post by No Future)
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...hts?CMP=twt_gu

    Source: the Guardian

    Student fees protest: lawyers launch legal challenge to kettling
    Kettling breaches human rights, lawyers for five student fees demonstrators tell Metropolitan police commissioner

    Lawyers have launched a legal challenge to the police tactic of kettling during recent student demonstrations, claiming a breach of human rights.

    The lawyers, acting for five of the thousands of demonstrators penned in by police last Thursday, have written to the commissioner for the Metropolitan police, Sir Paul Stephenson,arguing that kettling breaches European human rights legislation.

    The latest student demonstration saw thousands of people descend on London to protest about the rise in tuition fees and the drastic cuts to post-16 education.

    There were outbreaks of violence and several thousand demonstrators were kettled for hours in falling temperatures in three separate locations in central London.

    The five demonstrators – including four sixth-formers – say they were kettled for up to five hours in Trafalgar Square.

    Bethany Shiner, 23, the lead claimant, said: "I was with a group of young people who behaved at all times perfectly properly and lawfully. We then found ourselves kettled in sub-zero temperatures."

    Shiner, who has completed a masters degree in art and politics at Goldsmiths, University of London, added: "It is outrageous that the police should resort to such tactics against all protestors, most of whom were acting peacefully."

    The are represented by Bethany's father, Phil Shiner, of Public Interest Lawyers. He says the police tactics breach articles 5, 10 and 11 of the European convention on human Rights. "My clients are very concerned that the Metropolitan police are now using kettling as a stock response to all public protests and appear to have authorised kettling in advance of this particular protest," he said.

    He has sent a pre-action letter to Stephenson and the police have 14 days to respond. He added: "The police are required to have a range of lawful responses to different scenarios and not just resort to the most coercive tactics at the first sign of trouble. The policy of kettling has to be struck down."

    The legal challenge came as the Met said more than 180 people have been arrested conerning the student protests. Senior officers said most of the 182 suspects were aged between 17 and 25 and had no records of violence or crime.

    Detective Chief Superintendent Matt Horne, who is leading the inquiry, said he expects more people to be arrested as a team of 80 officers comb through video and stills footage.

    Speaking at New Scotland Yard today, where protesters were expected to attempt to "kettle" police later, he said the inquiry could take months to complete.

    In apparent contradiction to Theresa May's comments in the Commons yesterday, when the home secretary blamed violence on "an organised group of hardcore activists and street gangs", Horne added: "What struck me is the number of people arrested who did not go that day with necessarily any intention of committing any violent action."

    He said there had been a "stark contrast" between scenes in Westminster and at the protesters' homes, where police had been confronted with crying parents and shocked young people.

    He added: "I would urge those who turn up for protests to think about the impact this could have on their future careers. When they are shown footage of their actions that day, some are shocked by the impact of their behaviour."

    Stephenson said he had been "stripping London out" to police the protests, adding that almost 3,000 officers were deployed last Thursday. The Met had ruled out using water cannon three years ago, but was taking advice from colleagues in Northern Ireland about whether they could be used in London.

    Senior officers would consider asking the home secretary to ban forthcoming marches.
    Lol, I was negged for posting this?
    Don't shoot the messenger!
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axWyu1t4rkE

    You can see protesters scuffling with police. They all run like hell to get back, it allows the police to reform a stronger line.
    The police line was fine, there was no danger of it being broken. You can clearly see that in the first second in the video.

    The reporter can't even count.
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    t was allowed to go to parliament square. It was on the route. Except the plan was to pass it, not to stay there. But they couldn't stick to the plan because the police kettled them.

    And as far as I am aware, people were not allowed to leave unless you were very young.

    Originally Posted by callum9999
    Where did 9 hours come from? I don't believe people were kettled with no access to food or water for 9 hours.

    Even so, yes a sandwich would last anyone 9 hours. You'd be hungry but it's not going to do you any harm...
    I don't know if was quite 9 hours, but it was a very long time that people were kept without food or water or toilets. From mid afternoon till nearly midnight.

    My son went not having had lunch as he wasnt expecting to be kettled. So didnt eat or drink anything from 8 am till midnight when let out of the kettle. The march wasnt allowed on the preplanned route as the police kettled the marchers from about 1.30 onwards after they left trafalgar square because the police blocked the way to the embankment where the rally was supposed to be. My son found it distressing to not be allowed the loo, water, or food , to be herded like cattle in the freezing cold very close together, to be bludgeoned of he tried to get out, o not know if he was going to be able to submit his essay by the deadline the following day, to see young teenagers age 15 or so get upset and also he said there was a lot of blood around with no first aid for those who had been hit by police. He was quite shocked, it was an unpleasant experience he will never forget, he needed a lot of debriefing as he could not understand why peaceful students could be treated like that, wihtou any warning or provocation and he was also upset that the media portrayed the students as being all violent and was still shocked 2 days later. He is worried about fee rises because he is the type that worries about money. Thats why he went on the march.
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    I'm sorry but 46 seconds in you can see two protesters at the top left hand of the video go towards the horse that starts bolting. They either start pulling him off (which when watching the coverage on the day and recapping on this, it looks like is the case) or they do something that scares the crap out of it

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    (Original post by No Future)
    officers would consider asking the home secretary to ban forthcoming marches.
    Because that's legal.
    Imagine the riots that would happen if they tried to remove the right to protest!
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    (Original post by The West Wing)
    This has been done (identical facts) before in a case called Austin v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2009] UKHL 5; [2009] 2 WLR 372 - the House of Lords have decided that kettling does not breach the European Convention of Human Rights

    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5607670.ece &lt;- short summary
    I'm sure they are aware of this and they will bring some new angles/arguments to the table to distinguish their case from the above decision. I don't think they are looking for kettling to be found against the ECHR as a blanket rule, but rather it be found against the articles in these specific circumstances.
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    (Original post by Captain92)
    Because that's legal.
    Imagine the riots that would happen if they tried to remove the right to protest!
    Actually within a square mile of parliment it is legal to ban protests
 
 
 
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